A Girl Thing: Preview of Bombshell Dance Project’s Like A Girl Performance

Bombshell Dance Project gets ready to showcase three new works, including program headliner Like A Girl at Moody Performance Hall today!

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Bombshell Dance Project presents Like A Girl this weekend. Photo: Courtesy of Bombshell Dance Project.

Dallas — The inspiration for Like A Girl, one of two new works by Bombshell Dance Project’s Emily Bernet and Taylor Rodman, focuses on what it means to do something like a girl.

“We started out with the phrase “fight like a girl,” but then it expanded to doing anything like a girl and what does that mean especially now that there is such a boom in strong women,” Bernet says. “It’s not to say no progress has been made. It’s more like what does it mean now that we’ve made all of this progress?”

Rodman adds, “It’s interesting because we started off with a phrase that is kind of aggressive and then over the past year it has evolved into so much more, like what does it mean to be sensitive or what does it mean to be feminine like a girl?”

To accomplish their task the bombshells are incorporating some of what they learned during a fight choreography workshop with Prism Movement Theater co-founder Jeff Colangelo into their choreographic process, which features the duos’ penchant for large, powerful movement guided by contact improv, images and feelings. In this particular piece the bombshell’s movement choices are also being influenced by feedback from an online survey that asked questions such as what does it mean to be feminine and name something you believe in fighting for. The bombshells have also added to their ranks for this piece, with fellow female powerhouses Haley Tripp, Alyx Henigman and Alex Clair.

Emily Bernet and Taylor Rodman of Bombshell Dance Project. Photo: Katie Bernet

I caught up with the dance besties during one of their recent rehearsals at Preston Center Dance in which they candidly talked about their experience with fight choreography and what they have in store for the rest of their Like A Girl program, which takes place June 22 at Moody Performance Hall in Dallas.

“It was not an easy class,” Rodman says about Colangelo’s fight choreography workshop. “It was hard to keep it pure because it was so movement-based. It required us to find the balance between anticipating and not anticipating what was happening.”

Bernet laughs, “Oh yeah! We kept getting in trouble for dancing it.”

The class focused primarily on stances and how one should advance and back up and then progressed into more detailed techniques like how to throw a punch. From there more partnering was added and the students essentially made what dancers would call a phrase, according to Rodman. And while the pair will not be performing any of the fighting techniques, they say the experience has definitely impacted their creative process for Like A Girl. “The experience really opened us to the elements of listening and the reactive element in which you try not to anticipate what’s to come,” Bernet says. “The level of physicality involved and this quietness-from-behind-like approach also were aspects of the class that have stuck with me.”

The Bombshell’s second new work, All The More, was inspired by Harry Styles’ “Kiwi” music video and features a cast of 12 students from around the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The applicants were required to submit a three-minute improvisational video and it just so happened that all the submissions the bombshells received were from female dancers, a detail the ladies say works great for this show. “It was opened to everyone, but we would have picked females anyway for this particular show because we are exploring something that is really unique to females and so, that is kind of what we are going for this time,” Bernet says. She adds that the duo is working on some ideas for incorporating men into their work later down the road.

The third piece on the program is New York-based choreographer Amanda Krische’s LUNA. Rodman met Krische at YoungArts Miami during their senior year of high school, and they really got to know each other when they were selected as presidential scholars and spent two weeks together in Washington D.C. The two remained in contact throughout college and when the bombshells decided it was time to bring in another choreographer Rodman says Krische was always at the top of their list.

Krische graduated from Purchase College with a BFA in dance and currently resides in New York City where she works with her own set of dancers. Her choreography has been shown in such venues as LaGuardia High School, the Dance Theater Lab at Purchase College, SUNY, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Gallim Dance, the Actors Arts Fund and Ailey Citigroup Theater. Her work mainly focuses on the physical history of the body and its connection to memory. This is the first time her work will be presented in Dallas.

“We both learned a lot from her choreographic process,” Rodman says about their time with Krische. “She came in with one little phrase and floor pattern and turned that tiny nugget into a 10-minute dance in only four days. …Amanda works a lot with the ideas of memory, and when we were working with her she was really specific about creating a world and how the movement exists within that world even to the point of what the temperature is and what you are looking at and what you see at different moments.”

The bombshells describes Krische’s piece as a slow burn due to the repetitive nature of the movement. The piece starts off with the two dancers walking a specific number of steps in a predetermined pathway around the space before gestures, pauses and abrupt floor work are woven in to break up the monotony of their walks. The intensity of the piece builds as the dancers dig deep to maintain their high energy levels as the music changes from meditative to pulsating, which leads to an unexpected yet satisfying ending.

> This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

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