Tag Archives: Dallas Dance Events

Beckles Dancing Company Announces Sweatt Dallas Dance Festival 2018

Kaleb and Lacy in Duettino April 2018
Beckles Dancing Company members Kaleb Smith and Layla Brent in Duettino. Photo: Supreme Dream Photography 

Mark your calendars! The 2018 [Mary Lois] Sweatt Dallas Dance Festival (SDDF) will take place Oct. 12-13 at Ann Richards STEAM Academy in Dallas.

Entitled Back Together AgainSDDF will feature a performance on Friday evening and master classes on Saturday with the Melissa M. Young, the newly appointed artistic director of Dallas Black Dance Theatre.

The whole week will include master classes at two public schools, plus an open master class, a roundtable discussion and performances. The performances will include several companies, groups and soloists, including Jordan Willis, currently at Point Park University and the 2018 recipient of the South Dallas Dance Festival scholarship.

The goal of SDDF is to encourage collaborations between area artists and companies and to support each other’s growth and impact on the local community.

General admission: $15 for adults and $10 for students, seniors, members of Dance Council of North Texas and the Star System.

Master Class: $5.00 participants, $15.00 general

More information about the festival is available at www.becklesdancingcompany.org/events

 

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Preview: Dark Circles Contemporary Dance’s Aladdin, Habibi

MAGIC MOVES

Dark Circles Contemporary Dance takes us to a whole new world in Joshua L. Peugh’s Aladdin, Habibi, part of AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Elevator Project.

DCCD Company Member Chadi El-Khoury. Photo: Brian Guilliaux

Dallas — Over the last seven years Dark Circles Contemporary Dance’s Artistic Director Joshua L. Peugh has wowed us again and again with his insightful and unique perspective on the human condition as well as today’s social norms. He transfers this information to his dancers using a combo of classical and modern movements infused with his own special blend of grounded footwork, knee-bruising floor work and happenstance partnering. His aesthetic demands that the dancers be comfortable in their own skin, yet open and vulnerable on stage.

Peugh is asking this and much more from the company in his first evening-length creation, Aladdin, حبيبي, part of the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Elevator Project, Oct. 11-14, at the Wyly Theatre. The immersive 75-minute production focuses on American rhetoric regarding the Middle East and the stereotypes associated with Middle Eastern races and cultures. The work is based on the folk tale of “The Story of Aladdin” or “The Wonderful Lamp,” first written in The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (or The Arabian Nights).

Peugh says this process all began while browsing through a book store one Sunday morning. “I found a copy of Arabian Nights and the first line in the book is once upon a time in China. See when most people think of Aladdin they think of the 1992 Disney movie, but Aladdin was actually Chinese and the story was added later on by Frenchman Antoine Galland.”

He continues, “This was one aspect of the work. The other being company member Chadi El-khoury’s personal story, which includes his mom bringing him and his brother to America when he was 11 years old. We go to his Mom’s house every Sunday and she always calls her children Habibi, an Arabic endearment like ‘sweetheart,’ and it’s why the title of the work is called Aladdin, Habibi. We put the term in Arabic to signal to these people that their voice is being represented here.”

Peugh also points out that the work will feature a new score from Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts alumnus Brandon Carson and will be performed live by a six-piece band. The production also includes costumes designed by Susan Austin and lighting by Bart McGeehon.

“I honestly didn’t know what the music was going to look like until I got started with the dancers, but we needed music before rehearsals began and so I ended up sending Brandon a list of plot points and asked him to make them musical numbers. We started off with 20 minutes of music and have gone back and forth a lot until we got to today’s product.”

In the work the dancers also double as stage hands, which was evident during the run through I saw at Preston Center Dance in Dallas last Wednesday morning. When not executing movement in the center, the dancers are constructing a tent out of canes and fabric, playing a game of cards and actively observing their surroundings, just to give a few examples.

Peugh explains, “We played a lot of theater games and one of them was about making yourself very present and aware and basing everything you do on things outside your circle so you are inviting things to happen instead of making them happen, which is already the principles that I run the company on in the first place, but we are now expanding that in different directions.”

The example he gives is in regard to the architecture of the room. Because this show follows a narrative, Peugh had his dancers do a lot of exercises that had to do with using what is there in the space. “Everything you see in the show is stuff that was laying around the studio. So, everything is sort of a found object and not a created one and that mirrors the world we are trying to create in this dance.”

There were a lot of moving parts just within the first 20 minutes that I got to see of the show, so I will try to break it down for you without giving too much away. Company veteran El-khoury portrays the role of Aladdin and we get to witness his inner struggle of questioning certain rules and customs of the culture that he was born into and then coming to America and trying to fit in here. El-khoury’s journey of discovery involves two genies: the genie of the ring played by Jaiquan Laurencin and the genie of the lamp played by Lena Oren.

El-khoury moves with laser focus and incredible control during rehearsal. Deep lunges, swirling arms and rhythmic hip isolations are at the crux of most of his individual movement phrases. Over the last two years he has put on some noticeable bulk and his technical execution and artistic depth continues to flourish with every new piece the company puts out.

“He works really hard to make this happen,” Peugh says about El-khoury’s artistic growth. “He still works a full time corporate job and he works really hard to dance the way he wants. He has grown incredibly in the last several years. He’s fighting for it and he really loves dancing and it give him pleasure so that’s ultimately where it all starts from in the first place.”

Peugh admits that the creative process for this show has been a completely new experience for him. He doesn’t like to give his dancers too many details because he likes to see how the dancers take the material and make it their own. So, sitting down with the dancers after every rehearsal to talk about the narrative is really a foreign concept for him. Peugh says on the second day of rehearsals he asked the dancers to bring in a list or make a presentation to the group about the question ‘What is Middle Eastern?’ and from there he had the dancers take their lists and make a movement phrase based off one plotline in the story, and that is how the choreography for the show came to fruition.

“It was a really organic process,” Peugh says. “This has been one of the most fun, creative processes I have ever had. I have learned a ton and I am super proud of the work everyone has done. Everyone has put in a lot more than a few hours of learning steps.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: Texas Ballet Theater’s Cleopatra

Dancing Queen

Carolyn Judson on her role as the Queen of the Nile in Texas Ballet Theater’s production of Cleopatra in Fort Worth this weekend.

Carolyn Judson as Cleopatra. Photo: Steven Visneau

Fort Worth — With her girl-next-door looks and sweet disposition, Carolyn Judson is the obvious choice to play the female lead in story ballets such as GiselleCinderellaRomeo and Juliet and The Nutcracker. In addition to her physical attributes, Judson’s penchant for softer, more pliable body positions, delicate foot work and beautifully drawn out leg extensions also make for easy casting decisions. But this weekend she will be trading in these sweet roles for something more seductive in Texas Ballet Theater’s (TBT) Cleopatra at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth.

Transforming into this powerful temptress has been a fun challenge for Judson who also played the part in TBT’s 2009 production of Cleopatra. But because back then she only got the role last minute, Judson says she was more focused on learning the steps than working on the characterization, something she hopes to rectify this time around.

“This time around I really wanted to try and capture that strong woman human quality that I think is Cleopatra,” Judson says.

As to how she accomplished this task Judson says timing both in the literal sense and where she is artistically speaking played a pivotal role in the rehearsal process. “Well, for one thing I have had more time to devote to the character. I also have more experience to pull from and richer character development than I did years ago, which has really helped because this role is so emotionally draining.”

Judson is the type of dancer who learns by doing the movement as it materializes from the choreographer. So, when rehearsing for Cleopatra she says she retains movement best when she is copying what TBT Artistic Director Ben Stevenson is doing alongside her. But when it comes to understanding a certain feeling or emotion, Judson says she will usually watch Stevenson from the front so she doesn’t miss any of his nuances.

For this weekend’s performance Judson will be reunited with her former Cleopatra partner Andre Silva, whom she says she used to partner with all the time before he left the company only to return a couple of years ago. “Other than doing the sugar plum fairy variation in The Nutcracker last season this is our first full-length ballet together since he has come back, and we’re just really excited to be working together again. That we have been building on things that we’ve experienced in the past 16 years here has made our bond even stronger and we’re really enjoying our work together.”

Another beautiful bonus of TBT’s Cleopatra performance is the live accompaniment provided by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra and conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya. Judson points out that the majority of rehearsals have been to recorded music and it wasn’t until two weeks prior to the show that the conductor came to the studio to lay the music out on the piano.

“This way he can get used to our tempos and we can get used to doing something that’s not going to be always the same.” She adds, “This is important because it does takes quite a bit of rearranging your brain when dancing to live music since our minds kind of go on autopilot with a recording a lot of the time. So, it’s really helpful for us to have those two weeks before to get used to the music for both the dancers and the conductor.” She also notes that the company will not get to perform with the full orchestra until the Wednesday before the show.

A fun fact I learned about Judson is that during performances with live music she likes to find moments in the show to make eye contact with the conductor. “I think there are times when it’s appropriate to look at the conductor during a performance. For example, whenever I’m taking a bow I end up looking at him as sort of a thank you because this is such a nice collaboration between musicians and artists and so it’s much more enjoyable for us to feel like we are all working on the same project and not just two separate entities.” She adds, “I don’t look at the conductor all the way through the ballet, but I think there are times when you can really bring him in to the action on stage.”

It’s hard to talk to any professional ballet dancer nowadays without bringing up the lawsuit against New York City Ballet and Principal Chase Finlay and other scandals involving the company over the last year. With this in mind I wanted to know what steps, if any, has TBT taken to ensure that its dancers and staff feel safe and supported. “Actually at the end of last season we did have a company come in and work with us on just being mindful of how we talk to each other and how we treat each other. We also have our school here in the same building and just being aware of treatment of the children as well especially since some of the company dancers are also teachers at the school.”

She adds, “So yes we did go through a program with tests and educational information just to make sure that everyone is on the same page. And we are so lucky that we have a really great working environment here and we all consider each other family and in fact most of us are married to other people in the company.”

You can see Judson in Texas Ballet Theater’s production of Cleopatra Sept. 28-30 at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Avant Chamber Ballet Presents World Premiere at Holiday Performance in Southlake, TX

You can always count on Avant Chamber Ballet to get you into the holiday spirit without sending you into a Christmas coma!

ACB Nutcracker Eugene Barnes III and Yulia Ilina PC Sharen Bradford
Company Members Eugene Barnes III and Yulia Ilina. Photo: Sharen Bradford/The Dancing Image

Known as a nutcracker rebel, Katie Cooper of Avant Chamber Ballet (ACB) likes to steer clear of traditional Nutcracker productions. Instead she likes to focuses on other seasonal tales to create memorable holiday performances such as A Ballet Christmas Carol, Holiday Celebration and Nutcracker: Short and Suite.

ACB will once again be performing its Nutcracker: Short and Suite in Southlake, TX, on Nov. 15, but this time the company has a special treat for viewers. In addition to its Nutcracker rendition, ACB will also present the world premiere of Cooper’s Winter from Vivaldi’s “The Seasons.” The one-hour family-friendly performance will feature ACB’s 16 professionally-trained dancers, Cezanne String Quartet, plus new costumes and choreography. Cooper also points out that this will be the only professional dance production in the mid-cities area this year.

“This performance is a perfect introduction to live classical music and dance,” Cooper says in a recent press release. “Vivaldi’s ‘The Seasons’ is one of the most recognized pieces of music, but to see it with choreography and dance takes it to another level for the viewer. Nutcracker: Short and Suite is the second half of the evening with the best parts of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker and all the characters that you love.”

The performance is presented by Apex Arts League and ticket information is available at www.apexartsleague.com.

 

 

Dallas Dances: Tejas Dance

Founder Bhuvana Venkatraman on bringing the classical Indian dance style Baratanatyam to Dallas Dances this weekend.

Chintan Patel and Bhuvana Venkatraman of Tejas Dance. Photo: Tejas Danc

Dallas — Bhuvana Venkatraman is well known in the Dallas dance community for her roles as an instructor, performer, and advocate of classical Indian dance. More specifically Baratanatyam, which, when broken down, means the dance that encompasses music, rhythm, and expressional dance or Abhinaya and strictly adheres to the Natyashastra or the scripture of classical Indian dance. Venkatraman created Tejas Dance in 2014 as a way to enrich and popularize Bharatanatyam and also identify and encourage talent in the field. Venkatraman says she and Chintan Patel (artistic director of Tejas Dance) were drawn to Baratanatyam because of its vibrancy and the spiritual beauty it has to offer.

“We believe that Baratanatyam is looking at things beyond their actual appearance,” Venkatraman says. “We consider it a medium for finding metaphors in every event in our lives and finding its deeper roots in spiritual elevation.”

The duo has performed for many local organizations, including the Indian Cultural Heritage Foundation, the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, the 2017 Dallas City Council inauguration, Karya Siddhi Hanuman Temple, Allen Radha Krishna Temple and Arathi School of Dance, just to name a few.

Tejas Dance will be presenting Ardhanareeshawara – Synchronization of Dichotomy at Dallas Dances this Saturday night. The work features music from Parshwanath Upadhye’s album Shambho. The dance will explore the age old question: Are men and women really different?

“This dance talks about the two aspects of our society—the masculine and the feminine. Thinking of both of them as separate energies is common, but the actual spiritual elevation lies in knowing and understanding that these two characteristics though so different are one and the same,” she says. “If we understand that these two are nothing but a complementing half of a major energy, we realize how futile our efforts are to prove one is superior to the other.”

“This dance gives out a strong message to think of someone’s quality and abilities beyond their gender and find beauty within everything,” she adds. “It’s a great way for adults to find themselves more elevated from the claws of society and an excellent opportunity for kids to learn important concepts that will mold them for a better future and eventually leading to a better society.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Dallas Dances: kNOwBOX dance

Co-creator Martheya Nyaard breaks down the company’ intentions and what they have planned for Dallas Dances.

YeaJean Choi. Photo: Visionstyler Press

Dallas — Looking over the lineup for Dallas Dances, it’s exciting to see so many first-time presenters blended in with event staples such as Texas Ballet Theater, Bruce Wood Dance and Dallas Black Dance Theatre. One of these new faces is kNOwBOX dance, which was created by local choreographers YeaJean Choi and Martheya Nygaard at the beginning of 2018.

Choi and Nygaard met while earning their MFAs in dance at Texas Woman’s University in Denton. Their overlapping interest in making art that challenged contemporary and modern dance aesthetics lead them to becoming fast friends and dance peers. Choi was working as the dance department’s digital media coordinator and Nygaard as the department’s publicity coordinator when the duo starting brainstorming about what they were going to do after graduation. They came up with the question: how can artists have access to stay connected, make new work and share work globally, and from there kNOwBOX was born.

“We strive to say no to the box,” Nygaard says. “The box symbolizes the boundaries and confines that limit connections. We pursue experimental production and collaboration with other artists in order to create, discuss and advocate for art. …The vision of kNOwBOX dance is to use the digital space and alternative formats to collaborate and archive. Our social media-based Evolving Laboratories facilitate a global presence for our collaborators to make, capture and share art.”

For Dallas Dances Hyun Jung (Jenna) Change will be performing Choi’s 괴다 (The memory of love) to Donovan Jones’ song “The Memory of Love.” The piece uses Korean contemporary dance techniques to express one’s memory of love. Originally from Seoul, South Korea, Choi earned her BFA in Korean dance from the Sung Kyun Kwan University in 2012 and performed with Du-Ri Theater of Korea. Her work has been presented at World Dance Alliance-Americas in Mexico, Dallas DanceFest, Texas Dance Improvisation Festival, American College Dance Association, Seattle BOOST Dance Festival, Terrance M Johnson Dance Project, Big Rig Dance Collective and the Choreographer’s Series in Korea.

Later this year kNOwBOX dance will be co-producing, alongside the Dance Council of North Texas and the Dallas Public Library, the first Dallas Dance Film Festival. In terms of what they hope to accomplish with this new event Nygaard says, “It is our goal that this festival can support both local and international emerging and professional dance filmmakers and provide an affordable platform to share their work. This free festival also offers the community of North Texas a new way to engage with dance.”

“We hope this will be an annual festival that has the potential to grown into a weekend event with workshops, installations and guest artists.”

>This profile was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: Princess in Training, Texas Ballet Theater’s Cinderella

Paige Nyman on becoming a princess for Texas Ballet Theater’s production of Cinderella this weekend in Dallas.

Dallas — Every young girl dreams of one day becoming a Disney princess, including Texas Ballet Theater’s Paige Nyman who will get to live out her childhood fantasy in the company’s production of Cinderella at the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Winspear Opera House Aug. 24-26. “I have always related most to Belle and Cinderella,” says Nyman, who is celebrating her 10th season with TBT. “I relate to Belle because I love reading books too, and I have always admired Cinderella’s resiliency and her ability to find hope and make the best in every situation.”

Paige Nyman of TBT. Photo: Steven Visneau

Nyman started dancing at the age of 3 in her hometown of Kansas City. At 16, she received a scholarship to the Harid Conservatory where she trained under Svetlana Osiyeva, Oliver Pardina and Victoria Schneider. Nyman joined TBT in 2009 and since then has performed roles in Ben Stevenson’s DraculaSleeping BeautyPeer GyntRomeo and JulietCinderella and Four Last Songs, among others. She has also performed in George Balanchine’s Allegro Brilliante, Glen Tetley’s Voluntaries, Jiri Kylian’s Petite Mort, Harold Lander’s Etudes and the title role in Carlos Acosta’s Carmen.

This production marks Nyman’s first time performing a lead role in one of Stevenson’s acclaimed story ballets, an incredible opportunity Nyman says she is more excited than nervous about. “This is such a fun legacy to be a part of and I am enjoying finding who I am in the character. Cinderella has this wonderful innate sense of hope, joy and happiness, but also experiences deep hurt and sadness and it has been a fun challenge to learn how to internalize everything.”

In rehearsals the dancers work equal parts on technique and acting, which Nyman says is really what separates Stevenson’s story ballet from other ballet companies. “He just understands what audiences want to see and what we, the dancers, want to do. He is always finding new ways to keep the story ballets fresh.”

These story ballets are just one of many aspects Nyman enjoys about being a part of TBT. “This is one of the most welcoming places I have ever encountered. From the start I was afforded the chance to work closely with the other company members and choreographers and it has been a wonderful journey for me these past 10 seasons.” She adds, “Ben continues to stretch our boundaries while also staying grounded in his story ballets and I just feel at home here.”

Nyman admits that the road to becoming Cinderella isn’t all tutus and tiaras. “Dancing with inanimate object like a broom can be hard. It doesn’t reason with you,” she jokes.

Nyman is referring to the kitchen scene where she is imagining she is at the ball dancing with a handsome prince when in reality she is covered in filth dancing with a broom. This dance segment led to one of Nyman biggest questions about the process, which was how to keep the role authentic through these quick emotional changes. She explains, “I wanted to know how to create a natural transition from the high of imagining I am at the ball to suddenly realizing I am at home dancing with a broom.”

Nyman has also had to shift her mindset from being one of many dancers in the corps to taking center stage. “There’s this wonderful sense of camaraderie in the corps because we all have the same goal, which is to be the picture frame for the lead dancers. But when you transition into doing a lead role you have to step outside that mindset of amenity. You have to face the fact that the goal is that everyone is looking at you, and maintaining that level of engagement is a beautiful responsibility.”

And like all dancers Nyman has a ritual she does before every performance that might sound kooky to some, but continues to work in her favor. “In the dressing room I have to put my left eyelash on first, my left earring and my right pointe. That is my secret recipe.”

 

The Texas Ballet Theater season also features:

  • Ben Stevenson’s Cleopatra (accompanied by Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra) at Bass Performance Hall: Sept. 28-30, 2018
  • Ben Stevenson’s The Nutcracker at Winspear Opera House, Nov. 23-25 and Nov. 30-Dec. 2, before transitioning to Bass Performance Hall Dec. 7-9; Dec. 13; Dec. 15-16; Dec. 20-24. The Nutty Nutcracker, an unconventional take on the holiday classic, will be at Bass Performance Hall Dec. 14.
  • The first mixed repertoire, March 1-3, 2019, at Bass Performance Hall features the work of two renowned choreographers, William Forsythe and Christopher Bruce in In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated and Ghost Dances, respectively. TBT dancer Andre Silva will share his contemporary choreography in a world premiere called 11:11.
  • A collection of works by TBT Artistic Director, Ben Stevenson, O.B.E., is on the bill for the second mixed repertoire and includes Four Last SongsTwilightEsmerelda (pas de deux only) and L. The pieces will be performed at Bass Performance Hall March 29-31, 2019.

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: Wanderlust Dance Project III

Wandering Home

Gabriel Speiller performing at Jacob’s Pillow. Photo: Fermaint Photography

The third installment of Wanderlust Dance Project features new works by home grown talent at the Marshall Family Performing Arts Center on Saturday.

Dallas — Looking over the lineup for this year’s Wanderlust Dance Project (WDP) you can’t help but notice the number of local choreographers that will be presenting work at the Marshall Family Performing Arts Center at the Greenhill School in Addison this Saturday. Come to find out the local programming was a deliberate move by Wanderlust Founder Addison Holmes to support this year’s title, Wanderlust Dance Project III: Homecoming. “Our first year was New Horizons as our first venture, second was Explorations as we brought in a lot of outside choreographers for our dancers and this year we really wanted to hone in on our DFW roots with Homecoming,” Holmes says. The DFW dance scene is stronger than ever, and as a Dallas native myself I couldn’t be prouder.”

The choreographers include a couple of familiar faces such as Hailey von Schlehenried, Gabriel Speiller, Mark Caserta and Mikey Morado as well as some fresh faces, including Stephanie Troyak, Chad Vaught and Todd Baker.

Von Schlehenried recently participated in the premiere of AKA: Ballet and has also presented work at Dallas DanceFest, renamed Dallas Dances, and Avant Chamber Ballet’s 2017 Women’s Choreography Project. Viewers are used to seeing Speiller on stage with Bruce Wood Dance so, it will be interesting to see how he transitions from one role to the other. Caserta and Morado moved to Dallas in 2015 to head up The Thriving Artist Project and are currently working with Dark Circles Contemporary Dance. Troyak is a Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts (BTWHSPVA) graduate currently dancing with Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch. Baker was in the news last year as one of five male dancers from Booker T. to be accepted into The Juilliard School. And then there is Vaught, who is not from Dallas, but is currently dancing with DBDT: Encore!

From talking with a few of the choreographers I can tell you that the performance will be blend of contemporary, modern and classical movements arranged in small and large groups with a couple of pas deux’s mixed in. Themes vary from abstract to more story-based pieces that explore a wide range of emotions and current events.

Gabriel Speiller will be unveiling a new work, Unapologetic, which he describes as athletic, musical and sprinkled with intricate partnering. The piece features 16 professional and pre-professional dancers and was originally created for the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Queens, New York. Regarding his creative process Speiller says, “As a young choreographers I’m still exploring my choreographic voice by trying different approaches to the creation process, whether that be how I generate movement or how I translate what’s going on in my head to the dancers I’m working with.”

Whereas Speiller’s work focuses on athleticism and musicality, Stephanie Troyak’s piece is more focused on mood and setting. “I’m visualizing a dream-like world, one where we cannot tell if it’s real or if it’s a dream until perhaps later on when a situation brings out different sides of human connection whether it be love, betrayal, hope etc. Maybe a little bit apocalyptic or I imagine the setting a little bit like a flood both in the physical sense and the emotional sense, searching for land or light and consuming the mind and body.” Troyak adds, “I always love to blur the lines between reality and dreams and uncover a deeper layer of the human condition that I always find the most beautiful to find those dark or dirty places within. And within this dream state I hope to also unveil moments of small deaths or small victories or maybe it’s a memory or premonition.”

Another local talent presenting work at Wanderlust this year is Hailey von Schlehenried. She has created a pas de deux, which will beperformed by local dancers Adrian Aquirre and Diana Crowder to an excerpt of Ezio Bosso’s Seasong 1 to 4 and Other Little Stories. She describes the piece as classical, but with a contemporary vibe. “You will definitely see some contemporary lines, but also some classical movements and the partnering, which all fit into this storyline of a love left behind,” she says. When discussing the dancers and her partnering in the piece von Schlehenried says “Adrian and Diana work so lovely together and have such a strong connection when dancing this piece. They took to the choreography and the partnering quickly and I am excited to see the final product.”

And as far as the impact this event is making on the local dance community Speiller says, “WDP is an amazing project to be involved in. Not only does it give professional dancers like myself an opportunity to continue working over the summer, it’s giving the DFW community the opportunity to see new works by local and national choreographers that is being performed by home grown talent.”

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Dance Council of North Texas Announces New Dance Film Festival

As the Dance Council of North Texas (DCNT) exclaimed on its Facebook page yesterday, submissions are now being accepted for the inaugural Dallas Dance Film Festival (DDFF), which will take place Dec. 8 at the Dallas Public Library Fretz Park location. The festival is free and will feature emerging and professional dance filmmakers.

According to festival organizers, which includes DCNT, Dallas Public Library and kNOwBOX dance, there will be a Q&A with the film creators following the screening and audience members will participate in the selection process for the Best of the Fest dance filmmaker. In addition to the Best of the Fest award there is also an award for most creative and most innovative.

Rules say the film must be 5-10 minutes long, incorporate dance, must pay fee per submission and only two submission per artist. Submission deadline is Sept. 21.

If you are interested, please visit the DCNT website or FilmFreeway.com for more information about this event.

SIDEBAR:

18057094_1112345542203612_247591747880169388_n
Orlando Agawin rehearsing with Dark Circles Contemporary Dance. Photo: Courtesy of Joshua L. Peugh and DCCD

I can think of a few names I would like to see submit work for this festival, but one name stands out in my head and that is Orlando Agawin. A few months ago he posted a short film on social media featuring Dark Circles Contemporary Dance (DCCD) company member Lena Oren entitled Spring Break.

In the film Oren is frolicking around a tennis court in high-waisted jeans and white Keds to the soothing vocals of Elis Regina’s Aquas De Marco. I love the way she flirts with the camera and some how makes eating an orange look sexy. The film is so fun and silly and I just couldn’t stop watching it. I had no idea Orlando, who also danced with DCCD, was into filmmaking. I kind of want him to submit this short film so I can see it again, but on a larger screen this time!

 

 

 

Preview: Making Moves, AKA: Ballet

AKA: Ballet offers up a unique experience for both viewers and performers at the Latino Cultural Center tomorrow night.

From left: Carter Alexander, Hailey von Schlehenried, and Albert Drake of aka: Ballet. Photo: AKA: Ballet

Dallas — Hailey von Schlehenried is one of many local choreographers reaping the benefits of the changes that have been made to the Dallas dancescape over the last several years. Von Schlehenried first caught the public’s eye at Avant Chamber Ballet’s 2017 Women’s Choreography Project (WCP) and then again at Dallas DanceFest (DDF) later that summer. She has also recently been asked to set a piece for Wanderlust Dance Project, which marks another first for the blossoming artist.

It was at DDF where von Schlehenried met Carter Alexander (associate artistic director for Chamberlain Performing Arts) who asked if she would be interested in doing a collaboration the following summer. One thing lead to another and von Schlehenried is currently in the final stages of two new works, which will be presented alongside new pieces by Alexander and Albert Drake of Bruce Wood Dance at AKA: Ballet’s premiere performance at the Latino Cultural Center this Friday.

The performance will feature many familiar dancers, including Kaitlyn McDermitt, formerly with Avant Chamber Ballet; Alyssa Harrington, formerly with Dallas Black Dance Theatre; Alizah Wilson, Adrian Aquirre of Bruce Wood Dance; and Riley Moyano, Amanda Fairweather and Alex Danna of Texas Ballet Theater.

“We are so happy to have these dancers and they have been working so tirelessly in preparation for the show,” von Schlehenried says.

For this performance von Schlehenried has created two pieces: a classical pointe number and a more contemporary work. She describes the pointe work as fluid and free, and in contrast the contemporary work is visually darker, which meshes well with its theme about sinning. “I was really inspired by the music for the contemporary piece which is really centered on the idea of sin. The dancers pass around this scarf throughout the dance, which represents this idea of passing off our sins to someone else,” von Schlehenried says. “And the pointe piece is all about letting go and getting the dancers outside their classical boxes so that they appear to be surrendering to a situation.”

Von Schlehenried says her dancers played a big part in the creative process for both pieces. “I really wanted this to be a collaboration so I had the dancers brainstorm with me, which really makes them feel like they have a say and also relaxes the dancers. They all possess this amazing creative energy which helped make the process so much easier.”

Von Schlehenried is especially close with McDermitt who has had a role in almost every work she has put out since 2013. She even goes as far as calling McDermitt her lucky charm. “It just seems that every time I am working on a special project Kaitlyn is always in it. She is such a lovely person and is so into what she is doing, which really makes her a positive force for me and the arts community.”

McDermitt has definitely been paving a way for herself in the Dallas arts scene with gigs, including a couple of seasons with Katie Cooper’s Avant Chamber Ballet, performances at local festivals such as Plano Dance Festival and DDF as well as partaking in local arts events, including Dallas RAW and AKA: Ballet. She also teaches at Royale Ballet Dance Academy in Dallas and is a member of Ballet North Texas. She graduated from Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts with a BFA in dance performance in 2012.

You can see McDermitt and the other performers in von Schlehenried’s, still untitled, works this Friday evening at the Latino Cultural Center. Tickets are available at www.ticketweb.com. You can make a donation to the show at www.fracturedatlas.org.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.