Tag Archives: Dallas Dance Events

B. Moore Dance: 3D Vision

Dance Visionary

B. Moore Dance debuts with Bridget L. Moore’s evening-length NISSI at Addison Theatre Centre this weekend.

Photo: Christian Vasquez
Christian Burse & Natalie Newman of B. Moore Dance

 

Addison — We have seen her work performed by TITAS, Bruce Wood Dance (BWD) and Dallas Black Dance Theatre (DBDT), but now Dallas audiences will get to see what Bridget L. Moore’s choreography looks like when done on her own terms in the debut performance of her company, B. Moore Dance, Sept. 6-8 at Addison Theatre Centre.

Entitled NISSI, this evening-length production runs around an hour-and-a-half and features past and present works created by Moore, including some fan favorites such as Uncharted Territory and Southern Recollections as well as new pieces that focus in on Moore’s current sense of self.

“In trying to find a voice and an identity for B. Moore Dance, I decided to take the works that I’ve created and love so much and put them on my dancers because all of these works were created on particular companies,” says Moore.

Photo: Brian Guilliaux
Bridget L. Moore

“I created Sketches of Flames on Ailey II. And Southern Recollections was one of the first works that I made for DBDT and I also did Uncharted Territory for DBDT, but the work was originally commissioned by Charles Santos for the 2017 Command Performance Gala.”

When coming up with the program for her company’s first performance Moore says that she wanted to present some of those works, but also wanted to find a voice within the company that felt like it was its own. So, Moore took a page from artist and author Romare Bearden, who was the inspiration behind her work Southern Recollections, and decided to combine some of her old material with new material to create something new.

“That is something that Romare Bearden did quite often, which I really was intrigued by. He was able to take things from magazines and from his old works of art and combine them to create something new, and I thought that was really amazing. He always had these different motifs within his work and I feel like my work is very much like that. And that is why I decided to combine those things so there would be a specific voice for the dancers to all have right now.”

She adds, “I’m always interested in creating with the dancers in mind so I think NISSI in the perfect piece for B. Moore Dance. The dancers really look dynamic and amazing in it and I love it!”

The company is comprised of 11 dancers (six company members and five apprentices), and all of them have worked with Moore before in some capacity. She even has a couple of former students from Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. Audiences will also see a few familiar faces, including Alyssa Harrington, Lindzay Duplessis, Hailey Harding and Xavier Santafield.

As to why she choose to go this route Moore says, “With the beginning of this company I wanted the dancers to be individuals that I’ve worked with before and who really understand my work and understand my process.”

And while it did take some time for her to commit to the idea of starting a dance company, Moore says there was never a question in her mind that it all would happen in Dallas.  She explains, “With all the travelling that I have done I was ready to come back home and really wanted to be here. Dallas also has this great arts community and my roots are here as well as my friends and dance peers. And essentially having B. Moore Dance here in Dallas makes sense to me.”

In addition to her company’s debut performance, this season also marks Moore’s first year as the artistic director of Joffrey Ballet School-Texas. Regarding her appointment, Moore says, “I enjoy working with young artists and I am looking forward to guiding these students in their training and creating quality rapport with them.”

She adds, “I also want to connect them with different tools and people and assist them in their professional careers however I can.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

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Avant Chamber Ballet: Morphoses

Transforming Ballet

Avant Chamber Ballet kicks off its season with a triple bill featuring Christopher Wheeldon’s Morphoses and two works by Katie Cooper at Moody Performance Hall.

Photo: Dickie Hill
Avant Chamber Ballet presents Morphoses

 

Dallas — It has been a busy summer for Avant Chamber Ballet (ACB). In addition to preparing for its 2019-20 season, which kicks off with Morphoses Sept. 7-8 at Moody Performance Hall, the company also moved into its own studio space in the Dallas Design District in July. ACB Artistic Director Katie Cooper says that having their own space has been transformative for the company.

In previous years, Cooper says that the company would not have been able to put on a fall show because of the limits of renting or being lent space owned by ballet schools. “We had to wait till summer intensives and summer classes were over for us to have daytime hours.” This meant either rushing to put a performance together in late September or competing with a busy October arts month.

She adds, “So for us to find this weekend, and it worked for everyone involved, including musicians and everything, I am super happy and lucky that everything aligned for our fall show.”

Even though the company is heading into its seventh full season, Cooper says that in many ways this feels like their first year as a real company. Cooper explains, “We’ve transitioned to paying the dancers weekly, which is huge. And it makes sense for the dancers be paid weekly because every week that they’re working is actually a good work week now that we have a home.”

This weekend’s triple bill includes Christopher Wheeldon’s Morphoses, Cooper’s Sisterhood and the world premiere of Cooper’s Brahms Trio.

Regarding the program, Cooper says, “It feels like my miracle repertory because there was so many different puzzle pieces that had to come together and I am just so excited about it.”

One of these puzzle pieces was when the schedules of musicians Alexander Kerr (Dallas Symphony Orchestra Concertmaster), David Cooper (ACB Musical Director and Chicago Symphony Orchestra Principal Horn and Cooper’s husband) and Fei-Fei Dong (international piano soloist) aligned so they could perform alongside ACB in Cooper’s Brahms Trio, which is named after the work composed by Johannes Brahms.

Cooper says that she has always wanted to choreograph to the Brahms Trio and describes the music as very danceable, beautiful and romantic. She also says she wanted to do the classical music justice by only using classical choreography.

“I really wanted to do it well because it is a very classical piece of music and classical ballet,” Cooper says about the choreography for the piece. “And unless you do classical ballet right then it’s not good. It’s almost easier to pull off something really contemporary and new because when it’s classical it has to be well-rehearsed, interesting and clean.”

She adds, “The choreography has to be really good because there’s no bells and whistles or quirkiness that’s going to keep the audience’s attention. It really has to be beautiful, musical and interesting in its purity and the reflection of the music.”

Also on the program is Wheeldon’s Morphoses. As Cooper proudly states, ACB is only the third ballet company to perform the work after New York City Ballet and Washington Ballet. For those unfamiliar with the ballet, Morphoses is a complex and athletic ballet for four dancers set to György Ligeti’s String Quartet No. 1. ACB’s cast includes Juliann McAloon, Kara Zimmerman, Alexander Akulov and Marlen Alimanov. The music will also be performed live by Cezanne Quartet.

Rounding out the evening is Cooper’s Sisterhood, which the company premiered last May. The work features music by composer Quinn Mason and is a nice departure from Cooper’s classical roots. Instead of tutus and pointe shoes the dancers perform in trendy sportswear and sneakers.

When asked about these particular choices Cooper says, “I wanted to challenge myself with something different with the sneakers and clothing. Sneaker ballets are such a specific modern American thing. Just think of Jerome Robbins and Justin Peck does a lot of them now. I just wanted to explore something new, and that music I just loved.”

Cooper adds that putting Sisterhood on this program just made sense because it creates a nice balance with the other works. “The three ballets are so incredibly different and that’s what you always hope for in a triple bill. That they all have their own internal world and they’re all radically different.”

Looking back on the last several years Cooper says the company has really developed into what she wanted. “I always said I wanted a company that I would have wanted to dance to in. That every show there’s good stuff that’s fulfilling for the artists both physically, mentally and emotionally.”

“To me, being able to present this season that we have going is really finally the culmination of a lot of years of work.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Dallas Dances 2019: BWD

Dallas Dances Profile: Bruce Wood Dance

Company member Olivia Rehrman on learning Bruce Wood ‘s movement and performing a section of Garrett Smith’s Forbidden Paths at Dallas Dances this weekend. 

Photo: Sharen Bradford/The Dancing Image
Olivia Rehrman, center, in Garrett Smith’s Forbidden Paths, performed by Bruce Wood Dance

 

Dallas — Even though she never knew him Olivia Rehrman says she feels a strong connection with the late Bruce Wood through his movement aesthetic and those who knew the choreographer well, including Bruce Wood Dance (BWD) artistic staff members Kimi Nikaidoh, Joy Bollinger and Gayle Halperin.

“I really connected with the technical aspect of his movement,” says Rehrman who is celebrating her fourth season with the company. “I think I’m a pretty clean technical dancer, and his movement is very technical, strong and powerful.”

She adds, “What didn’t click right away was the partnering. All the transitions in his work are so smooth and the partnering I did before didn’t involve a lot of overhead lifts so the hardest part for me was learning how to come in and out of the floor with a partner.”

A Dallas native, Rehrman grew up training at the Academy of Dance Arts. She continued her training at The University of Arizona where she graduated in 2012 with a BFA in dance. Before joining BWD in 2016, Rehrman spent four seasons with the world-renowned jazz company, River North Dance Chicago.

During her time with BWD Rehrman has gotten to perform in works by Wood, Yin Yue, Kate Skarpetowska, Bridget L. Moore, Nikaidoh, Bollinger and Albert Drake III. When she’s not in the studio with BWD Rehrman can be found teaching ballet and modern at Tuzer Dance Center.

Rehrman says her favorite Wood work is the crowd pleasing RED. “It is so powerful and so exhausting to dance, but it is so rewarding when you push through it to the end.”

BWD actually performed RED at Dallas Dances 2017 at Moody Performance Hall, which is presented by the Dance Council of North Texas. At this year’s Dallas Dances BWD will be performing the third section of Garrett Smith’s Forbidden Paths, which the company premiered at its June performance.

In the last section of his piece, which was created in protest of an Iranian law that prohibits people from dancing in public, Smith has the dancers strip off their baggy clothes to reveal skimpy black shorts and tops. When asked about the costume choice Rehrman says, “I am not a modest person so the costume didn’t really bother me.”

She continues, “If anything, the affect the costume had on me is when I was wearing baggier clothes I felt like it was easier to make my movement look grounded or grungier almost. And being stripped down at the end you kind of want to physically come out of the floor, but you can’t do that because his movement is so grounded and you have to use your plie so much. So, I think physically the costume changed my movement and I had to kind of fight against that.”

As for what it was like working with Smith on this piece Rehrman says, “This experience has taught me to not take for granted what I do every day. So on those days that I am tired and don’t really feel like dancing I remind myself that not everyone has the luxury to dance the way I do.”

BWD will be performing Forbidden Paths as part of Dallas Dances’ Saturday program at Moody Performance Hall.

>This profile was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

 

Ballet North Texas Announces 2019-20 Season

BNT

The first time I spoke to Nicolina Lawson, the artistic director of Ballet North Texas (BNT), was last winter when I interviewed her about the company’s first Nutcracker production, which the company performed at venues in Dallas, Terrell and Palestine. She impressed me with her drive and clear focus regarding her plans for the company as well as her ability to multi-task with two young kids in tow. And I believe she is expecting baby #3 this fall.

Lawson also knows her way around a sewing machine. I know this because I  recently talked to her about making BNT’s Nutcracker costumes for a piece I wrrote for the Dance Council of North Texas’ DANCE North Texas publication.

During this conversation Lawson told me she had some big news to announce in the next couple of weeks. The big news turned out to be the lineup for BNT’s second season, which runs from Sept. 2019 to July 2020.

Leading off the season will be BNT’s annual production of Night on the Trinity. It will feature Associate Artistic Director Anna Sessions’ Mélange d’épices, Arthur Saint-Léon and Fanny Cerrito’s classic La Vivandière, two world premieres by Lawson and Cindy Michaels as well as a guest performance by Ballet Frontier of Texas. Performances will be held Sept. 19-20 at Moody Performance Hall in Dallas and Oct. 12 at the Scott Theater in Fort Worth.

BNT’s Nutcracker will return to the stage for two productions on Nov. 24 and Dec. 20-21. Close to 60 children’s rolls are cast to join BNT’s Nutcracker, which is choreographed by Lawson to Tchaikovsky’s famous score.

In April 2020 BNT will present Cinderella at the Irving Arts Center. The Company will venture into Prokofiev’s haunting score to transport the lonely heroin from her wistful fireside dreams to a dazzling palace ball where she will meet her prince.

The season will conclude with Shakespeare’s comedic romance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Moody Performance Hall in July. The ballet follows the quarrels of King and Queen of the Fairies and the mayhem of mismatched lovers, abetted by mischief-maker Puck. All coming to a resolve with the infamous “Wedding March” by Felix Mendelssohn.

Tickets will be available soon. For more information visit www.balletnorthtexas.org.

Join Ballet North Texas as we embark on our next step to becoming one of the top tier ballet companies Dallas/Fort Worth has to offer.

We are holding this fundraiser to secure assets for the construction of our brand-new facility. When this new space is complete, we will be introducing North Texas Conservatory to serve as the premier school of Ballet North Texas. North Texas Conservatory will offer world class dance and music lessons for students of all ages and abilities. It is with your commitment and dedication that enables us to take this next step towards building the conservatory as our founders have envisioned.

All funds from this event will benefit Ballet North Texas and North Texas Conservatory in the buildout and furnishing of the Conservatory, outreach and special needs programs, as well as the upcoming 2019-2020 season.

Preview: LakeCities Ballet Theater’s Coppelia

Dancing Dolls

LakeCities Ballet Theatre serves up another kid-friendly ballet with Coppelia, featuring special guest Steven Loch at MCL Grand Theater in Lewsiville.

LakeCities Ballet Theatre Presents Coppelia. Photo: Nancy Loch Photography.

Lewisville — As I watched LakeCities Ballet Theatre (LBT) rehearse Act 1 of Coppelia Artistic Director Kelly Kilburn Lannin leaned over and whispered how this particular section of music always reminds her about the time their Franz injured himself mid-performance and Steven Loch, who was 12 at the time, was asked to step in and danced the final part of show perfectly.

Later, when I mentioned this story to Loch in the breakroom where we sat down to talk he laughed and says he gets acknowledged quite often for his ability to jump into roles at the last second—a skill that he says he learned from Lannin and her team at the Ballet Conservatory in Lewisville.

“There is so much supply and not enough demand so the high level of excellence gets even more exaggerated,” Loch says about what it takes today to become a professional ballet dancer. “You have to be the most valuable worker to have the best shot, and I think one of the great things about here is Kelly knew that from the beginning. She knew that if you want to make it as a dancer than you’re going to have to learn to do it all.”

Photo: Pacific Northwest Ballet
Steven Loch

He adds, “And also too, the standard that she puts on students are so high and you know have to hit those standards because there’s no forgiveness. Then, when you go the professional world you have good habits. You’re disciplined. You’re a good worker. You’re a professional and you’re a good human. And it’s actually surprising how valuable that is. And Kelly’s standard is such that even for understudies you have to be able to jump in and do it perfectly so that no one notices or you are going to be in trouble.”

But in the same breath Loch also says Lannin is very nurturing, which I saw firsthand during one of the company’s Coppelia rehearsals a couple of weeks ago. “She is so sweet and loving and gives so much of herself,” Loch says. “She gave me so much love and not only cared about me as a dancer, but also a person. She was my mentor growing up and she taught me everything in order to be ready for the professional world.”

After graduating from high school in 2009, Loch joined the professional program at Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB). He joined the company in 2011 and was promoted to corps de ballet in 2012. He was promoted to soloist at the end of last season. Throughout his career with PNB Loch has returned home on numerous occasions to perform leading roles in LBT’s productions, including DraculaGiselleThe Nutcracker and Coppelia.

As for his reasons for returning, Loch says, “This place is my home and it has given me so much so I definitely want to return the favor.”

He continues, “I also get called in to do the leading roles, which when I was younger I didn’t get the opportunities to do. It also gives me more practice and experience in these roles so when I start performing lead roles in Seattle I will be more ready.”

Regarding his reaction to the news of his promotion last season, Loch says, “When I got promoted to soloist it was really satisfying because I had put so much work into it and to see the fruits of your labor turn in to something like this just felt really special.”

He adds, “As dancers we are all perfectionists so earning this title has also definitely given me more confidence.”

Watching Loch jump into rehearsal after just stepping off a plane I couldn’t help but wonder what he does to help prevent injury and illness. On this topic Loch says, “Recovery is so important so anything that can help me speed up recovery is great. I do cryotherapy. I have Norma Tec boots. I do a lot of stretching and roll out using a roller. I also do massage and work with this lady who does Trager Approach in addition to neuromuscular therapy.”

Of all the recovery methods that he uses Loch says the cryotherapy has been the most effective for him. “It’s so much more efficient than icing because you are put in such a cold environment that the blood goes to your core instead of your extremities. So it’s more nutrient rich, and it only takes three minutes, and you are able to move afterwards, so you can do it before working out or after working out. And it makes you recover three times faster than you normally would so, for me that has been a huge game changer.”

You can check out Loch in LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s rendition of Coppelia, March 29-31, at the Medical City of Lewisville Grand Theater in Lewisville.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet’s Myth & Magick

Bewitching Ballet

Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet explores the hierarchy of witches in its version of The Rite of Spring, part of the company’s Myth & Magick at the Sammons Center.  

Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet presents Myth & Magick. Photo: Alisa Eykilis

Dallas — Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet (DNCB) has never been afraid to present works showcasing the darker side of ballet. If anything, the company thrives on performing work that is raw, dark and peculiar. Case in point, The Company’s annual Horror Series where the dancers are decked out in drab clothes covered in fake blood and crazy hair and makeup. Other works that come to mind include DNCB’s retelling of The Red Shoes in 2015 and Masque of the Red Death in 2016.

So, when I head DNCB was doing its own version of Vaslav Nijinsky’s and Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring at its Myth & Magick performance on March 22 at the Sammons Center for the Arts in Dallas, I couldn’t wait to find out what kind of twist Artistic Director Emilie Skinner would be adding to her recreation of the infamous ballet.

When she told me the nine female dancers would be portraying witches my first thought was that these characters were well-suited for the ballet, which is already steeped in pagan rituals, including a human sacrifice near the end. And second, what would make Skinner decide to take on such an ambitious project.

Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet presents Myth & Magick. Photo: Alisa Eykilis

Skinner says the ballet wouldn’t have been possible without the help of Lane Harder, a professor at Southern Methodist University and the director of the music ensemble SYZYGY. She says Lane was the one who threw out the idea of doing The Rite of Spring at one of their brain storming sessions. “I remember the first time I saw the ballet live, which was when the Joffrey Ballet did it in Dallas in 2013. I was really impacted by it and so, it has stuck out in my mind ever since. When Lane brought it up he said we had the players so we decided to go for it.”

Going into the process Skinner says the most challenging aspect for her was taking a work that has a large number of dancers and translating it onto just nine female dancers. She goes on to say that she wanted to stick closely to the original choreography, but had to take into consideration the intimate space they would be performing in due to the frenzied nature of the ballet. “I don’t think our version looks as chaotic as others, like Joffrey, because I don’t have as many dancers doing as many different things. And because we are doing this at the Sammons Center and in a round I didn’t want it to be too much for the audience to take in when they are sitting right there at stage level.”

She adds, “I really like the setup at the Sammons Center. I think it’s a fun way to present the piece and it makes it a little more raw that it’s right there and it’s just so aggressive and weird and unfamiliar movement for a lot of people including us.”

The all-female cast was a purposeful choice made by Skinner to bring attention to the strength and femininity that she picked up on while researching the culture of witches. She did make it a point to say that while she is drawn to certain aspects of the culture she is not a practicing Wiccan.

“I am not a witch, but there is something about that style and aesthetic that fits really well and I can just plug that into The Rite of Spring. And when I think about the Pagan rituals and sacrifice in the piece I just automatically go to this Wiccan history.”

She continues, “This piece is more focused on the feminine side of that culture. It’s just seems so powerful and feminine and nice and beautiful, but also kind of scary and dark, which is kind of what our company is about.”

The all-female cast represents different degrees of witches, including the neophytes (lowest degree), second-degree witches and third-degree witches or high priestesses, which will be represented by long-time DNCB company member Lea Zablocki. The dancers will be wearing long black skirts and crops tops decorated by local artist Heather Lynn who says in a Facebook post that she was inspired by Pagan runes and celestial diagrams. Skinner says loose hair and body paint will complete the look.

“I wanted her to create different designs for each of those groups of witches,” Skinner says about the costuming. “And Lea is actually making herself this crazy huge head piece. So, this sort of barbaric nature, raw and down-to-earth kind of feel.”

The program on Friday will open with a re-staging of Erik Satie’s Mercure from 1924, which will also include live accompaniment by SYZYGY. Also featured in the first half will be an original work by a composition student of the Meadows School of the Arts Division of Music.

You can catch Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet’s The Rite of Spring at the company’s Myth & Magick performance at the Sammons Center for the Arts this Friday.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com

 

Preview: Dark Circles Contemporary Dance’s Spring Series

Below the Surface

Dark Circles Contemporary Dance reaches new artistic depths in Sidra Bell’s new work Nervosa, part of the company’s Spring Series in Addison this weekend.

Dark Circles Contemporary Dance rehearsing Nervosa. Photo: Courtesy of DCCD

Addison — With only flesh-toned G-strings and dance belts covering their lower halves, one by one the dancers run into the space and execute an upper spinal curve that accentuates the muscular lines of their chests, thighs and glutes before being pulled off stage by some invisible force. This back and forth continues until, suddenly, all the dancers run on and form a circle in the right, upstage corner. Standing shoulder to shoulder the dancers remain motionless except for the heavy rise and fall of their bare chests and their eyes, which are actively searching the space.

This is just a taste of what New York-based Choreographer Sidra Bell has in store for Dallas audiences in her new work Nervosa, which premieres at Dark Circles Contemporary Dance’s Spring Series this weekend.

Bell is one of the hottest names in the dance world right now thanks to her unique style, which explores bodily forms through the modular lenses of flesh, bones, nerves, memory, site and history, according to her Web site. Her knowledge of visual art also plays an important role in her creative process. Bell’s work has been seen throughout the U.S. and abroad, including Sweden, Denmark, France, Germany, Slovenia, China, Canada, Korea and Brazil. Her company, Sidra Bell Dance New York, has rapidly garnered an international profile for work that reveals aspects of the human condition through a distinctly female lens.

After watching a run-through of Nervosa in February at Preston Center Dance, Bell sat down to talk with the small audience that was there about her creative process for this piece and answer any questions we might have for her.

Bell starts off by telling us that Nervosa is about making you and making me in two parts and is housed within a much longer work that her company is currently working on that focuses on the nervous system and how it affects the way a person feels and moves. “The piece is about relationships and what it means to really feel someone,” Bell says. “It’s also about what makes the nervous system tick and sensing the people around us with our eyeballs and skin.”

This statement definitely brings more clarity to that moment where the mostly nude dancers are standing in a circle watching one another as well as the following duet where Eric Lobenberg slowly walks around the space with Victoria Daylor draped over his shoulder. This is an extremely raw and tender moment between the couple, which thankfully isn’t diminished by their nudity; something Bell was hyper aware of when she made the decision for the dancers to be mostly nude for this part of the dance. (Note: The dancers wear black and gray long sleeved-unitards for most of the work)

“It was a late decision,” Bell says about the nudity. “It was made in an effort to export more of the human experience. The nudity in the duet feels natural and more innocent and does not conjure violence. It also brings attention to the lines of the body.”

“She made the decision with 30 minutes left to the end of our rehearsal the day before the preview,” Daylor says. So, we did it again with nudity and it just completed the work.”

Regarding the nudity in the duet Daylor says, “When Eric is holding me it feels comfortable. I feel close to him. His body feels like a layer of clothes against my back. I actually feel more vulnerable in the first part of the duet where we are not touching and the wind on my skin reminds me of my nudity.”

And as for working with Bell, Daylor says it was a wonderful experience and she was pleasantly surprised with how much personalized time Bell gave to them. “She gave us very individual things to work on that were not just about the choreography, but also things to help further our dancing going forward.”

Daylor uses her solo at the beginning of the dance as an example. After the group disperses, Daylor starts walking around the space and stops occasionally to contract her chest, which then ripples down into her hips and legs. Her movements remain fluid and evenly paced even when Nick Heffelfinger enters and begins convulsing on the ground.

“She gave me advice on things to do with my focus. She told me to think about the muscularity of my eyes and how deep set they are in my face. She also wanted me to be seeing everything around me in a way that is energetic.”

When I asked her if Heffelfinger’s frenzied movement ever made her lose her focus Daylor laughingly said, “I actually have no idea what he does because I am in my own world. For me, I am just here on earth and he is something on another planet and maybe we collide at some point, but I can’t give him too much attention.”

As for the control and stability Daylor exudes in her solo she says she has to give some of the credit to her outside training in the Gyrotonic method. “It has really helped me with my focus and stability of my breath when I’m dancing. Underlying it with my dancing has given me a good base.”

You can catch Daylor and the other members of Dark Circles Contemporary Dance in Bell’s Nervosa at the company’s Spring Series, March 22-24, at Addison Theatre Centre. The program also includes the premiere of Joshua L. Peugh’s Dialogue featuring Tejas Dance, a local Bharatanatyam Indian classical dance duo.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com

 

Preview: Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s 2019 Cultural Awareness Series

Justified Movement

Dallas Black Dance Theatre celebrates singer and Civil Rights activist Odetta Holmes in Matthew Rushing’s Odetta, part of the company’s Cultural Awareness Series at the Wyly Theatre.

Matthew Rushing. Anddrew Eccles

Dallas — The moments that have stayed with me days after watching Dallas Black Dance Theatre rehearse Matthew Rushing’s Odetta (2014) were, interestingly enough, not the full bodied-movements, grandiose jumping passes or powerful partnering skills, though these elements were incredible and well suited for the dancers. No, it was the quieter moments where the dancers relied on basic instinct and human connection to fulfill their roles that have left an imprint on me.

A perfect example is the opening scene when company member Kayla Franklin (who shares this role with Lailah Duke) slowly walks toward the audience as she cuts through the space with her arms and curves her spine over. As the opening notes of Odetta Holmes’ rendition of “This Little Light of Mine” fill the space, a joyous expression crosses Franklin’s face as she circles her hips and bounces from heel to heel to an internal beat that soon takes over her entire body.

Another memorable instance is the section where Jasmine White-Killins and De’Anthony Vaughan use mainly arm gestures while sitting on side-by-side stools in center stage to “There’s a Hole in The Bucket” sung by Holmes and Harry Belafonte. The song is fun and playful and White-Killins and Vaughan do an admirable job of conveying the emotions in the catchy tune. For example, as White-Killins begins to lose her patience, her arm movements become sharper and more pronounced, such as when she demonstrated how to sharpen an ax by rubbing her forearm intently across her right thigh.

And yet another picturesque moment occurs as Sierra Noelle Jones and Zion Pradier dance on a self-made dock to Bob Nolan’s “Cool Water” while the rest of the dancers watch attentively from their seated positions. At first I thought the couple was dancing on a stage, but as Jones cups her hand and extends it over the edge of the stage it transforms into a dock. The dock is actually six benches constructed of different-sized squares, which enables the benches to interlock with one another to appear as train seats as well as add a cool visual affect when they are placed vertically in other sections of the work.

“I wanted to work with something that was interchangeable and from scene to scene could kind of morph into whatever the scene was about,” Rushing says about the set. “I knew I would be dealing with a lot of different sections because Odetta Holmes’ work was so huge that I would be working with Blues and Jazz, protest songs and works from musical theatre so I knew it would be very layered within itself. So, whatever the set would be it would have to be able to morph and change in these different environments and settings.”

Come to find out, the idea for the set was actually a miniature I.Q. test that Rushing says he found while on tour in Germany and what we see onstage today is a much larger replica of these wooden Lego-like parts of this cubed puzzle.

This work also requires a high level of maturity, vulnerability and trust, which, when watching the dancers rehearse, it’s obvious to see DBDT possesses these qualities in spades. These ingrained abililties can also be attributed to why DBDT is the first company to perform Odetta outside of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre.

“They are extremely versatile dancers,” Rushing says about DBDT. “They are able to go in and out of different genres of dance and that skill is required for the ballet Odetta so I just felt it was an easy fit.”

He adds, “They are incredible artists who are also extremely expressive as well as technically strong in different styles of dance. And just like Odetta’s work was extremely diverse and layered I feel that the artists of Dallas Black Dance Theatre are exactly that as well. They are extremely diverse and they have many layers to their artistry.”

This is not the first time Rushing has worked with DBDT. The rehearsal director for the Ailey Company choreographed Tribute for DBDT in 2016, which was also when he first brought up the subject of DBDT possibly doing Odetta sometime in the future.

“I remember being in tech rehearsal sitting next to Ms. (Ann) Williams and it hit me at that point. I could really see the dancers of Dallas Black Dance Theatre performing Odetta,” Rushing says in a press release from DBDT.

As for Rushing’s inspiration for this work, singer and actress Odetta Holmes, he says, “One of the biggest “aha!” moments I had with choreographing this piece was finding out just how Odetta Holmes used her gift as an instrument and as a weapon for social justice. That spoke to me directly and it encouraged me and challenged me that I could do the same with choreography and with being a dance artist.”

He adds, “She might not have been the person leading the marches, but she was the person who led the rallies before the marches and I was like WOW how amazing that we all in a sense have a piece in this puzzle about making this world a better place. And she was very confident and clear that her place fell into using her gift as a singer and musician and I really connected with that when I found out about her work and how she literally changed the world with her gift.”

Odetta makes its Dallas premiere at DBDT’s Cultural Awareness Series, Feb. 15-17, at the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre in Dallas. The program also includes Dianne McIntyre’s Nina Simone Project, an evening-length work DBDT premiered back in 2011.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: Paul Taylor Dance Company

A Modern Celebration

The new artistic director of Paul Taylor Dance Company on following in his mentor’s footsteps and the company’s celebration tour which comes to the Eisemann on Saturday.

Michael Novak and Laura Halzack. Photo: Courtesy of Paul Taylor Dance Company

Richardson — It has been six months since the passing of American modern dance pioneer Paul Taylor, but the loss still sits heavy for many who have had some kind of connection to the iconic dance maker, whether it be through books, documentaries, dance classes, lectures, performances, or, for me, speaking to him on the phone for an article. These Taylor encounters are the reason why Paul Taylor Dance Company’s (PTDC) new Artistic Director Michael Novak has decided not to dance with the company at its performance at the Charles W. Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson, on Feb. 9.

“I am not dancing in Richardson because it’s important for me to be out in the house to mingle with a lot of the residents there,” Novak says. “It actually has been a really powerful experience to meet people especially as part of Paul’s passing away. There are a lot of people who come to me to introduce themselves and they almost always have some kind of relationship to Paul and it’s important that I hear those stories from different people and let them feel heard. I think Richardson is a great place to engage with people in that particular way and I am looking forward to doing that.”

Engaging with the audience is something Taylor requested that Novak do, along with continuing to dance with the company. “When I had met with Paul he had specifically requested that I keep on dancing. Obviously it meant that I had to refocus how often I was actually going to be dancing because one of the things that Paul also wanted me to do is not only be on stage performing as an artist. He also felt that it would be important for me to be out in the actual house meeting with audience members.”

Michael Novak. Photo: Bill Wadman

Novak adds, “It’s a balance that is new for me and one I am having a fun time figuring out.”

As far as what has been the most challenging part of his new job position Novak says, “taking a step back and looking at how much Paul Taylor actually did in his career and how do you celebrate that in a way that gives people who know his work so well an opportunity to be reminded of how great it was and gives them this massive overview. But also how do you do it in a way that entices new audiences to come in and to use this opportunity to really celebrate the company in a way that takes us forward?”

Originally from Illinois, Novak started dancing at the age of 10. In 2001, he was offered a Presidential Scholarship to the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and the following year he became an apprentice at the Pennsylvania Academy of Ballet Society. After an injury caused him to take some time off from dance, Novak decided to go back to school. He attended Columbia University’s School of General Studies where he was awarded scholarships for academic excellence. It was at Columbia where he became interested in the study of dance history, which ignited his passion for modern dance.

Novak started dancing at the Taylor School in 2007 and was asked to join the company in 2010. Since then he has danced 56 roles in 50 Taylor dances, 13 of which were made for him, including Three Dubious Memories(2010), which happens to be the focus of the Paul Taylor documentary “Creative Domain,” which will be shown at the Eisemann on Thursday following master classes with company members Robert Kleinendorst and Sean Mahoney.

On Saturday the company will perform four iconic works by Taylor: Aureole (1962), Three Epitaphs (1956), Piazzolla Caldera (1997) and Promethean Fire (2002).

In our discussion about these choices Novak says, “Aureole really established him as one of the emerging choreographers of the mid-20th century. It was also the first time in Paul’s career that he explored this notion of not only the Baroque music, but also this very fluid, beautiful and simple approach to dance making.”

He goes on to say that Three Epitaphs is well known for its costumes, which keep the dancers’ faces covered, and describes Piazzolla Caldera as a steamy, gritty and energizing tango piece that doesn’t have a single tango step in it. The final work of the night is Promethean Fire, which Novak says many audiences have associated with the events of 9/11 and centers around this idea of a community of people overcoming obstacles in order to maintain hope and move forward.

Looking back on his time working with Taylor, Novak says his experience was incredibly positive. He admits that in the beginning all he wanted was for Taylor to enjoy his dancing, but says that over time it became more about reading his mind and his physicality. “As a dancer who worked for him you were often waiting on him to tell you what to do or to give you an idea of what he was looking for and you tend to not respond verbally, but you tend to respond physically.”

“The relationship is built on trust and it’s based on this intuitive understanding of where the other person is at and trying to make art. So, over the course of my eight years, I got to know him very well in the sense of being able to read his mind a little bit and figuring out how best we could collaborate.”

The trust that Novak speaks about also played a major role in his appointment by Taylor as the next artist director of PTDC. “When Paul invited me over for a meeting where he told me that he wanted me to take over his company he said that he trusted me, and that was a huge moment for me because Paul was not a man of many words. Usually if he liked what you were doing he wouldn’t say anything. So when he would give a compliment or say something was beautiful it usually meant that it was almost transcendent.”

He continues, “So when he said that he trusted me it was very touching and probably the most profound thing he could ever say to any of his artists and to me in particular. It has also given me a great deal of confidence to know that he believed in me and what I bring.”

This confidence has also helped as Novak preps for the company’s future. His plan includes building off what Taylor started five years ago when he created Paul Taylor American Modern Dance at Lincoln Center. “It’s this three pillar approach to presenting modern dance that wasn’t just Paul Tayor and his repertory. It also included historic modern dance works from the entire cannon. Coupled with that are the contemporary choreographers that we bring in to work on the Paul Taylor Dance Company.”

Novak adds, “I am incredibly passionate about those three aspects and figuring out after we have this celebration dance maker tour how we can continue that going forward. I am determined to do both in the sense that there are important modern dance historical works that haven’t been seen in a long time both within the Taylor cannon and modern dance that I would love bring back and share with audiences. But I also believe in curating new artists to come in and make work. We really have to do both.”

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: Dark Circles Contemporary Dance’s Winter Series

Out of this World

Dark Circles Contemporary Dance aims to resemble alien rock stars in Mark Caserta and Mikey Morado’s new work Dregs, part of the company’s Winter Series at WaterTower Theatre.

DCCD rehearses Dregs. Photo: Brian Kenny

Addison — “An alien dark underbelly vibe, but with a gentle tone,” is how Mark Caserta describes the mood of Dregs, a new piece he and fellow choreographer and boyfriend Mikey Morado have created for Dark Circles Contemporary Dance’s (DCCD) Winter Series, which boosts works made by queer choreographers centering on gay identity in America. The program will also feature Eoghan Dillon’s Boys Are and Joshua L. Peugh’s Bud, which he did in collaboration with multimedia artist Brian Kenny. The performance will be held Jan. 24-27 at Addison Theatre Center, DCCD’s new home for 2019 thanks to its new partnership with WaterTower Theatre.

“It’s quite gender confusing, but very sexy,” Caserta says about the approximately 22-minute work, which includes an original score by Pittsburgh-based slowdanger whom he says mixed the track in the studio while the dancers worked. “It’s alien and out there, but also has a relatable vibe.”

As for the choreography in the piece Morado says, “We like to work with images that are more chic and simplistic and less confetti and more latex. So, what we made at the end of the day was a very alien world that has its own rules and doesn’t really operate within this 2019 America vibe.”

Morado and Caserta are both products of reputable dance institutions. Morado received a BFA in dance at Marymount Manhattan College before joining Sidra Bell Dance New York in 2013. Caserta trained at the Ailey School and graduated from the University of the Arts with a BFA in ballet performance. He has danced with Eleone Dance Theatre, Complexions Contemporary Ballet, Les Ballets Jazz De Montreal and Camille A. Brown + Dancers.

Mikey Morado in Mark Caserta’s Good Boy. Photo: Matthew Caserta
The couple met via social media and began collaborating with each other soon after. They were living and working in New York City when they decided to move to Dallas to work for Christy Wolverton-Ryzman at Dance Industry Performing Arts Center in Plano, in 2015.

“I have known of Dance Industry since my time at Complexions,” Caserta says. “The kids would come to New York City to attend workshops, and through them I developed a relationship with Christy and Jamie Anderson. They had offered me a job a few years before, but I was working, so it wasn’t until 2015 when Mikey and I were looking for a change that I asked them if the offer still stood and we moved to Dallas.”

Morado says that his relationship with Dance Industry didn’t start until after the couple had made their decision to move. “I had never met either of them, but we came out in March to teach and see what the vibe was here and Jamie and Christy picked us up from the airport and the second we got in the car with them there was an instantaneous certainty that we belong here. So, they brought me on and gave me basically the same amount of role that Mark has in the studio.”

It was about a year later when Wolverton-Ryzman handed over the reins of the Thriving Artist Project to Morado and Caserta. “This was something she had started the year prior to hiring us,” Morado says. “It was a small scale project and really more about her connecting with the kids and giving them professional advice.”

He continues, “I think she knew she wanted to amp up the program and that she wanted to do something that would extend beyond the walls of Dance Industry in a very real and practical concert dance sense. So her bringing Mark and I on, she knew that she would be well-connected to the current dance world that is still happening in New York and all over the world.”

So far Morado and Caserta have been living up this promise as evident by the list of names they have on the Thriving Artist Project’s event calendar online. The list includes high end choreographers such as Sidra Bell of Sidra Bell Dance New York, Jonathan Alsberry of Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Micaela Taylor of TL Collective and Christie Partelow of Nederlands Dans Theater.

When I brought up that these are names you typically associate with local dance institutions such as Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts Morado replies, “There are a lot of shiny and glitzy things in Dallas and particularly around Booker T. and so it’s very easy for that to be considered the mecca of ‘shiny dance things,’ but I think it’s really meaningful and impactful for these kids that Mark and I work with that we work in a way that is very humble and we choose to work with artists who reflect that humility.”

He adds, “What sets us apart as individuals, but also as a couple is our level of consideration and really making sure that the quality and connection is genuine. That it’s never forced and we work with artists who we truly support.”

It was through the Thriving Artist Project where Morado and Caserta meet Peugh who was at the couple’s first performance back in 2016.  “He was super complimentary and we clicked with him right away,” Morado says.

“It was such a bold and loving move for him to reach out to us,” Caserta says. “He is a smart businessman and has become a great friend.”

Mark Caserta. Photo: Matthew Caserta
The couple met via social media and began collaborating with each other soon after. They were living and working in New York City when they decided to move to Dallas to work for Christy Wolverton-Ryzman at Dance Industry Performing Arts Center in Plano, in 2015.

The dance duo also had nothing but nice things to say about their time in the studio with the DCCD dancers. “We were super inspired by the dancers and just by that particular group that is with Dark Circles right now,” Morado says. “They have such a warm chemistry among them and the majority of them identity as gay or queer themselves, and I think particularly being in Dallas and connecting with people like that has a bit deeper of a ripple than it would in a place like New York because there is less of a demographic there for that.”

While discussing the creative process for Dregs, Morado says it was done in reverse order to what people generally consider normal. So, instead of giving the dancers specific movement phrases or specific motifs, he says they generated a lot of the movement based off of the tasks they had the dancers doing such as free writing and coming up with their own gesture movements, which they later combined into collaborative group phrases.

Morado explains, “The experience for them is very personal, and rather than giving them the details and having them form the piece around that we kind of had them form the piece and then said ‘oh that is a detail we want to put in.’” He adds, “We also made an effort to highlight each dancer individually and to not stick with one soloist. We wanted to equalize everyone and especially with a group this talented we would be short changing ourselves if we didn’t individualize the piece for them.”

For this work, DCCD has also paired with Youth First, a program of Resource Center and one of the only youth centers in the North Texas area aimed at meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth ages 12-18. The company has been teaching masterclasses for the teens which explore identity and self-expression through movement.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.