Tag Archives: Dallas Dance

B. Moore Dance: 3D Vision

Dance Visionary

B. Moore Dance debuts with Bridget L. Moore’s evening-length NISSI at Addison Theatre Centre this weekend.

Photo: Christian Vasquez
Christian Burse & Natalie Newman of B. Moore Dance

 

Addison — We have seen her work performed by TITAS, Bruce Wood Dance (BWD) and Dallas Black Dance Theatre (DBDT), but now Dallas audiences will get to see what Bridget L. Moore’s choreography looks like when done on her own terms in the debut performance of her company, B. Moore Dance, Sept. 6-8 at Addison Theatre Centre.

Entitled NISSI, this evening-length production runs around an hour-and-a-half and features past and present works created by Moore, including some fan favorites such as Uncharted Territory and Southern Recollections as well as new pieces that focus in on Moore’s current sense of self.

“In trying to find a voice and an identity for B. Moore Dance, I decided to take the works that I’ve created and love so much and put them on my dancers because all of these works were created on particular companies,” says Moore.

Photo: Brian Guilliaux
Bridget L. Moore

“I created Sketches of Flames on Ailey II. And Southern Recollections was one of the first works that I made for DBDT and I also did Uncharted Territory for DBDT, but the work was originally commissioned by Charles Santos for the 2017 Command Performance Gala.”

When coming up with the program for her company’s first performance Moore says that she wanted to present some of those works, but also wanted to find a voice within the company that felt like it was its own. So, Moore took a page from artist and author Romare Bearden, who was the inspiration behind her work Southern Recollections, and decided to combine some of her old material with new material to create something new.

“That is something that Romare Bearden did quite often, which I really was intrigued by. He was able to take things from magazines and from his old works of art and combine them to create something new, and I thought that was really amazing. He always had these different motifs within his work and I feel like my work is very much like that. And that is why I decided to combine those things so there would be a specific voice for the dancers to all have right now.”

She adds, “I’m always interested in creating with the dancers in mind so I think NISSI in the perfect piece for B. Moore Dance. The dancers really look dynamic and amazing in it and I love it!”

The company is comprised of 11 dancers (six company members and five apprentices), and all of them have worked with Moore before in some capacity. She even has a couple of former students from Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. Audiences will also see a few familiar faces, including Alyssa Harrington, Lindzay Duplessis, Hailey Harding and Xavier Santafield.

As to why she choose to go this route Moore says, “With the beginning of this company I wanted the dancers to be individuals that I’ve worked with before and who really understand my work and understand my process.”

And while it did take some time for her to commit to the idea of starting a dance company, Moore says there was never a question in her mind that it all would happen in Dallas.  She explains, “With all the travelling that I have done I was ready to come back home and really wanted to be here. Dallas also has this great arts community and my roots are here as well as my friends and dance peers. And essentially having B. Moore Dance here in Dallas makes sense to me.”

In addition to her company’s debut performance, this season also marks Moore’s first year as the artistic director of Joffrey Ballet School-Texas. Regarding her appointment, Moore says, “I enjoy working with young artists and I am looking forward to guiding these students in their training and creating quality rapport with them.”

She adds, “I also want to connect them with different tools and people and assist them in their professional careers however I can.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

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Avant Chamber Ballet: Morphoses

Transforming Ballet

Avant Chamber Ballet kicks off its season with a triple bill featuring Christopher Wheeldon’s Morphoses and two works by Katie Cooper at Moody Performance Hall.

Photo: Dickie Hill
Avant Chamber Ballet presents Morphoses

 

Dallas — It has been a busy summer for Avant Chamber Ballet (ACB). In addition to preparing for its 2019-20 season, which kicks off with Morphoses Sept. 7-8 at Moody Performance Hall, the company also moved into its own studio space in the Dallas Design District in July. ACB Artistic Director Katie Cooper says that having their own space has been transformative for the company.

In previous years, Cooper says that the company would not have been able to put on a fall show because of the limits of renting or being lent space owned by ballet schools. “We had to wait till summer intensives and summer classes were over for us to have daytime hours.” This meant either rushing to put a performance together in late September or competing with a busy October arts month.

She adds, “So for us to find this weekend, and it worked for everyone involved, including musicians and everything, I am super happy and lucky that everything aligned for our fall show.”

Even though the company is heading into its seventh full season, Cooper says that in many ways this feels like their first year as a real company. Cooper explains, “We’ve transitioned to paying the dancers weekly, which is huge. And it makes sense for the dancers be paid weekly because every week that they’re working is actually a good work week now that we have a home.”

This weekend’s triple bill includes Christopher Wheeldon’s Morphoses, Cooper’s Sisterhood and the world premiere of Cooper’s Brahms Trio.

Regarding the program, Cooper says, “It feels like my miracle repertory because there was so many different puzzle pieces that had to come together and I am just so excited about it.”

One of these puzzle pieces was when the schedules of musicians Alexander Kerr (Dallas Symphony Orchestra Concertmaster), David Cooper (ACB Musical Director and Chicago Symphony Orchestra Principal Horn and Cooper’s husband) and Fei-Fei Dong (international piano soloist) aligned so they could perform alongside ACB in Cooper’s Brahms Trio, which is named after the work composed by Johannes Brahms.

Cooper says that she has always wanted to choreograph to the Brahms Trio and describes the music as very danceable, beautiful and romantic. She also says she wanted to do the classical music justice by only using classical choreography.

“I really wanted to do it well because it is a very classical piece of music and classical ballet,” Cooper says about the choreography for the piece. “And unless you do classical ballet right then it’s not good. It’s almost easier to pull off something really contemporary and new because when it’s classical it has to be well-rehearsed, interesting and clean.”

She adds, “The choreography has to be really good because there’s no bells and whistles or quirkiness that’s going to keep the audience’s attention. It really has to be beautiful, musical and interesting in its purity and the reflection of the music.”

Also on the program is Wheeldon’s Morphoses. As Cooper proudly states, ACB is only the third ballet company to perform the work after New York City Ballet and Washington Ballet. For those unfamiliar with the ballet, Morphoses is a complex and athletic ballet for four dancers set to György Ligeti’s String Quartet No. 1. ACB’s cast includes Juliann McAloon, Kara Zimmerman, Alexander Akulov and Marlen Alimanov. The music will also be performed live by Cezanne Quartet.

Rounding out the evening is Cooper’s Sisterhood, which the company premiered last May. The work features music by composer Quinn Mason and is a nice departure from Cooper’s classical roots. Instead of tutus and pointe shoes the dancers perform in trendy sportswear and sneakers.

When asked about these particular choices Cooper says, “I wanted to challenge myself with something different with the sneakers and clothing. Sneaker ballets are such a specific modern American thing. Just think of Jerome Robbins and Justin Peck does a lot of them now. I just wanted to explore something new, and that music I just loved.”

Cooper adds that putting Sisterhood on this program just made sense because it creates a nice balance with the other works. “The three ballets are so incredibly different and that’s what you always hope for in a triple bill. That they all have their own internal world and they’re all radically different.”

Looking back on the last several years Cooper says the company has really developed into what she wanted. “I always said I wanted a company that I would have wanted to dance to in. That every show there’s good stuff that’s fulfilling for the artists both physically, mentally and emotionally.”

“To me, being able to present this season that we have going is really finally the culmination of a lot of years of work.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Dallas Dances 2019: DBDT

Dallas Dances Profile: DBDT

Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Xavier Mack on his second season with the company and performing Darrell Grand Moultrie’s Execution of a Sentiment.

Photo: Avitava Sarkar
Xavier Mack in Execution of a Sentiment

 

Dallas — Xavier Mack began his dance training with Divine Dance Institute in Capitol Heights, Maryland. He went on to attend the University of Maryland-Baltimore County where he earned a BA in Modern Language and Linguistics. Mack’s says his dance journey with the Dallas Black Dance Theatre (DBDT) organization started at one of the company’s summer intensives.

“I met Nycole Ray, the director of DBDT: Encore!, when I attended DBDT’s 2016 summer intensive,” Mack says. “From there, we stayed in contact while I was completing my college studies. Mrs. Ray offered me a contract upon graduation.”

Mack spent one season with DBDT: Encore! before he was asked to join DBDT in 2018. When asked about the move from DBDT: Encore! to DBDT Mack says the transition wasn’t a difficult one. He explains, “The standard of excellence is high for both companies. The warm environment of the established DBDT dancers also helped make my transition painless.”

Mack also credits DBDT Artistic Director Melissa M. Young for creating an environment where the dancers feel comfortable taking risks, which, in the long run, helps them become better artists and individuals. “Since being under Melissa’s leadership, I am better at managing my goals, instead of letting my goals manage me. She often reminds us to take things one step at a time (literally and figuratively), one hour at a time, and one day at a time.”

Mack adds, “With the advice of this peaceful approach I’ve noticed that I have been able to meet more of my personal marks.”

For this year’s Dallas Dances, DBDT will be presenting Darrell Grand Moultrie’s Execution of a Sentiment set to music by Ezio Bosso. The company premiered the piece at its 2019 Spring Celebration Series.  Talking about the concept of the work Mack says that the piece does not have a general feeling. Instead it has many different feelings sprinkled throughout its three sections.

“There are moments of somber stillness. Then, there are contrasting moments buzzing with intensity. In fact, the mission of the movements is to physicalize emotions that are normally communicated verbally.”

As far as what he feels when performing the work, Mack says, “I feel electrically charged. Especially during the third section. There is something about the dramatic music and the dazzling work of my beautiful team that gets me going!”

DBDT will be performing Execution of a Sentiment as part of Dallas Dances’ Saturday program at Moody Performance Hall.

> This profile was originally posted on TheaterJones.com

 

Ballet North Texas Announces 2019-20 Season

BNT

The first time I spoke to Nicolina Lawson, the artistic director of Ballet North Texas (BNT), was last winter when I interviewed her about the company’s first Nutcracker production, which the company performed at venues in Dallas, Terrell and Palestine. She impressed me with her drive and clear focus regarding her plans for the company as well as her ability to multi-task with two young kids in tow. And I believe she is expecting baby #3 this fall.

Lawson also knows her way around a sewing machine. I know this because I  recently talked to her about making BNT’s Nutcracker costumes for a piece I wrrote for the Dance Council of North Texas’ DANCE North Texas publication.

During this conversation Lawson told me she had some big news to announce in the next couple of weeks. The big news turned out to be the lineup for BNT’s second season, which runs from Sept. 2019 to July 2020.

Leading off the season will be BNT’s annual production of Night on the Trinity. It will feature Associate Artistic Director Anna Sessions’ Mélange d’épices, Arthur Saint-Léon and Fanny Cerrito’s classic La Vivandière, two world premieres by Lawson and Cindy Michaels as well as a guest performance by Ballet Frontier of Texas. Performances will be held Sept. 19-20 at Moody Performance Hall in Dallas and Oct. 12 at the Scott Theater in Fort Worth.

BNT’s Nutcracker will return to the stage for two productions on Nov. 24 and Dec. 20-21. Close to 60 children’s rolls are cast to join BNT’s Nutcracker, which is choreographed by Lawson to Tchaikovsky’s famous score.

In April 2020 BNT will present Cinderella at the Irving Arts Center. The Company will venture into Prokofiev’s haunting score to transport the lonely heroin from her wistful fireside dreams to a dazzling palace ball where she will meet her prince.

The season will conclude with Shakespeare’s comedic romance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Moody Performance Hall in July. The ballet follows the quarrels of King and Queen of the Fairies and the mayhem of mismatched lovers, abetted by mischief-maker Puck. All coming to a resolve with the infamous “Wedding March” by Felix Mendelssohn.

Tickets will be available soon. For more information visit www.balletnorthtexas.org.

Join Ballet North Texas as we embark on our next step to becoming one of the top tier ballet companies Dallas/Fort Worth has to offer.

We are holding this fundraiser to secure assets for the construction of our brand-new facility. When this new space is complete, we will be introducing North Texas Conservatory to serve as the premier school of Ballet North Texas. North Texas Conservatory will offer world class dance and music lessons for students of all ages and abilities. It is with your commitment and dedication that enables us to take this next step towards building the conservatory as our founders have envisioned.

All funds from this event will benefit Ballet North Texas and North Texas Conservatory in the buildout and furnishing of the Conservatory, outreach and special needs programs, as well as the upcoming 2019-2020 season.

Avant Chamber Ballet Announces New Company Home

Avant Chamber Ballet Summer Intensive
Student summer intensive at ACB’s new studio space. Photo: Courtesy of ACB.

After years of borrowing space from other dance studios in the area Avant Chamber Ballet (ACB) has taken the leap and found itself a home base in the Dallas Design District where the company is currently holding its summer intensive series.

ACB is the second professional dance company to settle down in the Design District. The Bruce Wood Dance Gallery is just a couple miles south of ACB’s new home. Since opening its doors about five years ago, the Bruce Wood Dance has held many classes, fundraisers and choreographic sneak peeks at this location.

To celebrate this grand accomplishment, ACB will be hosting an open house and mini performance at the newly named Avant Chamber Ballet Center, 2408 Farrington St., on Aug. 25 at 3:30p.m.

The performance will include excerpts from the season opening mixed repertoire program Morphoses, which the company will present, Sept. 7-8, at Moody Performance Hall in the Dallas Arts District.

The full press release is included below:

 

AVANT CHAMBER BALLET ANNOUNCES NEW STUDIO HOME

DALLAS, TX (July 16, 2019)

Avant Chamber Ballet Artistic Director Katie Cooper announces the opening of the new Avant Chamber Ballet Center in the Dallas Design District. The studio space will be the rehearsal home for the professional company but will also house a new training program for young dancers this fall.

“This is an incredible step forward for the company. Having our own home studio means that we will be able to rehearse and train consistently for performances, but also have a pipeline for training young dancers who may eventually join the company,” says Katie Cooper.

To celebrate the new studio, the company will host an open house and mini performance at the Avant Chamber Ballet Center, 2408 Farrington Street, Dallas Design District, August 25th at 3:30pm. The performance will be excerpts from the season opening mixed repertoire program “Morphoses” which ACB will perform at Moody Performance Hall September 7-8th.

“I am so proud of where the company has gone in the last 7 seasons,” says Music Director David Cooper. “The new studio represents Avant Chamber Ballet establishing itself firmly in the future of arts in Dallas.”

Subscriptions for the full Avant Chamber Ballet season are now at TicketDFW.com. Single tickets go on sale August 1. Subscribers will receive a 40% discount on all four productions.

Avant Chamber Ballet Announces 2019-20 Season

Avant Chamber Ballet goes bigger and bolder for its 2019-20 season with an added mixed rep in the fall, its first full-length Nutcracker production and new works and company premieres by George Balanchine and Christopher Wheeldon.
Romeo & Juliet
Avant Chamber Ballet presents Romeo & Juliet. Photo: Dickie Hill.

ACB will open its season in Setpember with Morphoses, a mixed repertoire program featuring Wheeldon’s Morphoses, Katie Cooper’s Sisterhood and a world premiere by Cooper to the famous Brahms Horn Trio. David Cooper, ACB’s musical director and the newly appointed horn of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, will be lending his talents to the Trio alongside musicals Anastasia Markina and Alexander Kerr.

I will miss Cooper’s clever take on a holiday classic like she had done previous years with A Ballet Christmas Carol and Little Match Girl Passion, but I am eager to see how she manages her first full-length Nutcracker. With choreography by local ballet legend Paul Mejia and a live orchestra, this Nut is already at the top of my list to see this year.

Mejia’s name appears again on ACB’s February program with his rendition of Romeo & Juliet. The company will also present Balanchine’s Raymonda Variations (a first for the company) in addition to a world premiere collaboration between Cooper and local Composer Quinn Mason. Mason also composed the music for Cooper’s Sisterhood.

The program I am most looking forward to is ACB’s Beauty and Beyond in April because of these three names: Cooper, Kimi Nikaidoh and Jennifer Mabus. Their voices and disciplines may be different, but I feel they share a common thread when it comes to storytelling and choreographic intent. Can’t wait to see what they do!

You can view the full press release below:

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Email: info@avantchamberballet.org

AVANT CHAMBER BALLET ANNOUNCES 2019-20 SEASON

DALLAS, TX (June 25, 2019)

Avant Chamber Ballet’s artistic director Katie Cooper and music director David Cooper announce the company’s 2019-20 season, featuring four subscription productions at Moody Performance Hall in the Dallas Arts District and the return of the Family Saturdays series. The season includes four world premieres by choreographers Katie Cooper, Kimi Nikaidoh, Jennifer Mabus, as well as five company premieres by Paul Mejia, Christopher Wheeldon, and George Balanchine. “This season is an incredible expansion for us in so many ways,” says Katie Cooper. “We are adding a fall mixed repertoire program and for the first time presenting a full-length Nutcracker with live music!”

The subscription season opens with Morphoses in September, a mixed repertoire program of three ballets: Christopher Wheeldon’s Morphoses, Katie Cooper’s Sisterhood and a world premiere by Katie Cooper to the famous Brahms Horn Trio. The Trio will be performed by internationally known musicians Anastasia Markina (piano), Alexander Kerr (concertmaster of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra) and David Cooper (principal horn of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra).

In December, Avant Chamber Ballet presents a full-length production of The  Nutcracker for the first time designed and choreographed by Paul Mejia with live orchestra accompaniment conducted by Brad Cawyer. This holiday classic is designed to take the whole family on a magical trip to the Land of Sweets through Clara’s eyes with Tchaikovsky’s rich score and ACB’s professional production.

Paul Mejia’s romantic and tragic Romeo & Juliet is the perfect way to celebrate Valentine’s Day. The performance features live music which brings the famous Tchaikovsky score and this timeless story to life. Opening the performance is George Balanchine’s beloved Raymonda Variations (company premiere) which celebrates the beauty of classical ballet and the sparkling score by Glazunov.  Next is a world premiere collaboration between ACB director Katie Cooper and local composer Quinn Mason. The ballet marks the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote and is inspired by the women who made it happen. Also featured will be a guest company appearance by Ballet Frontier from Fort Worth.

Closing the season will be Beauty and Beyond featuring four ballets with live music: the company premiere of Christopher Wheeldon’s Five Movements, Three Repeats which includes the famous “This Bitter Earth” pas de deux, world premieres by Kimi Nikaidoh and Jennifer Mabus- commissions of the  2020 Women’s Choreography Project, and Katie Cooper’s staging of  Aurora’s Wedding: Sleeping Beauty Act III.

This season also marks the return of the Family Saturdays Series. This year all four performances are free. The shows are a family-friendly one hour designed to introduce the performing arts to kids of all ages.

Subscriptions go on sale now at TicketDFW.com. Single tickets will go on sale August 1. Subscribers will receive a 40% discount on all four productions.

THE 2019-2020 SEASON OVERVIEW

SUBSCRIPTION SERIES:

Moody Performance Hall, Dallas, TX

 

MORPHOSES

September 7th, 2019, 7:30pm

September 8th 2019, 2:30pm

Morphoses  – Christopher Wheeldon/Ligeti, Company Premiere

Brahms Horn Trio – Katie Cooper/Brahms, World Premiere

Sisterhood – Katie Cooper/Quinn Mason

 

THE NUTCRACKER

December 20th, 2019, 7:30pm

December 21st, 2019, 7:30pm

December 22nd, 2019, 2:30pm

Paul Mejia/Tchaikovsky, Company Premiere

 

ROMEO AND JULIET

February 14-15th, 2020, 7:30pm

Romeo and Juliet – Paul Mejia/Tchaikovsky, Company Premiere

Raymonda Variations – George Balanchine/Glazunov, Company Premiere

New Katie Cooper/Quinn Mason

Guest company Ballet Frontier

 

BEAUTY AND BEYOND

April 17-18th, 2020, 7:30pm

Five Movements, Three Repeats – Christopher Wheeldon/Richter, Company Premiere

Kimi Nikaidoh – Women’s Choreography Project Commission, World Premiere

Jennifer Mabus – Women’s Choreography Project Commission, World Premiere

Aurora’s Wedding: Act 3 Sleeping Beauty – Katie Cooper after Petipa

 

FREE FAMILY SATURDAYS SERIES:

Moody Performance Hall, Dallas, TX

 

Peter and the Wolf

September 7th, 2019, 2:30pm

 

The Nutcracker Suite

December 21st, 2019, 2:30pm

 

I Heart Ballet

February 15th, 2020, 2:30pm

 

Aurora’s Wedding: Sleeping Beauty Act III

April 18th, 2020, 2:30pm

 

Additional performances:

NUTCRACKER: SHORT AND SUITE

November 21, 2019, 7:30pm

White’s Chapel, Southlake, TX

Presented by Apex Arts League

Programming and casting for all productions are subject to change without notice.

Tickets on sale this fall through TICKETDFW.COM

About Avant Chamber Ballet:

Avant Chamber Ballet’s mission is to bring exceptional live dance and chamber music together for audiences in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. Our ensemble of classically trained dancers presents a diverse repertoire of classical and contemporary works from local choreographers, as well as internationally acclaimed artists. Since our inaugural season in 2012, ACB has presented over twenty world premiere ballets. The organization is in its eighth season, and is led by artistic director Katie Cooper and music director David Cooper.

Additional information is available on Avant Chamber Ballet’s website at www.avantchamberballet.org

Preview: Bruce Wood Dance’s Embrace Showcase

Forbidden Dance

Garrett Smith pays homage to those living in countries where dancing is banned in Forbidden Paths, part of Bruce Wood Dance’s Embrace concert.

Garrett Smith’s Forbidden Paths is part of Bruce Wood Dance’s Embrace Concert. Photo: Brian

Note: This preview was written in April after a private viewing of the work at the Bruce Wood Dance Gallery.

Dallas — Unmoving, the nine Bruce Wood Dance (BWD) company members sit on their haunches with their heads bowed and wrists locked behind their backs. The longer the dancers remain in this pose, which continues for about a full minute, the more overwhelming the moment becomes as my mind shuffles through similar images I have seen in the news recently. It brought up the images of people praying outside the burning Notre Dame Cathedral as well as images of those in mourning after the bombings in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday.

This poignant section occurs in the middle of Garrett Smith’s new work, Forbidden Paths, which premieres at BWD’s Embrace showcase, June 14-15, at Moody Performance Hall in Dallas. The program also includes Joy Bollinger’s critically acclaimed Carved in Stone and the Dallas premiere of Bruce Wood’s Dark Matter, previously only seen when the company was in Fort Worth.

Smith’s powerful use of imagery is one of the many reasons that BWD’s Artistic Director Bollinger wanted him to come work with the company in Dallas. “The first time I saw his work I immediately fell in love with the musicality, powerful imagery and incredible partnering,” Bollinger says before the viewing.

Originally from Utah, Smith began his dance training with the Utah Regional Ballet and performed in the 2002 Salt Lake Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony. He later studied at the Houston Ballet Academy and created five works for Houston Ballet II’s repertoire. As a dancer with Houston Ballet, Smith got to perform works by Stanton Welch, Jorma Elo, Nicolo Fonte, Christopher Bruce, Ben Stevenson and Christopher Wheeldon.

It was only after seeing the piece that Smith told us about the concept, which started when he became aware that dance is prohibited in the country of Iran. “For me, this is the image of being detained,” Smith says about the section mentioned above. “There was a group of seven individuals in Iran that had danced to Pharrell Williams’ ‘Happy’ and they were detained for a month.”

He continues, “So I tried to imagine myself in that position and how extremely scary that would be for doing something that is not wrong. It is wrong according to their Islamic Constitution, but everyone should have that right to express themselves through dance and that is really the driving force for this piece.”

Whereas Wood’s gesturing is usually viewed as light-hearted and comical, the gesturing in Forbidden Paths comes across as more celestial. A prime example is when the dancers appear to be cupping a precious ball of energy between their hands, which they then manipulate aggressively and rhythmically around their bodies and outward.

Smith credits his use of gestural images to his time spent with the great Czech choreographer Jirí Kylián at the Norwegian National Ballet. Smith has also worked personally with Nacho Duato and Alexander Ekman and has also performed multiple pieces by William Forsythe.

Another striking moment in Forbidden Paths is Megan Storey’s opening solo. Her balletic lines melt into contorted shapes and weighted walking patterns, which she breaks up with flex-footed jumps and textured gesturing. Frustration is evident in her expression as her eyes follow an unknown source.

We found out later that the movement in Storey’s solo depict certain feelings and emotions that were stirred up by specific questions Smith had asked the group at the beginning of the process. “I asked the dancers’ questions such as what does dance mean to you? And how would you feel if you could not dance? The dancers then created solos based off their word choices, which I later sculpted into the piece,” Smith says.

At this point Smith asked Storey to step forward and show us some of the gestures she had crafted from these questions. She described an open-chested pose as her moment of discovery and expressed her anger through an unexpected jump with flexed-feet and fisted hands.

When talking with Storey about her solo later on she says, “I based the choreography off of the words I had chosen for my ‘paper phrase’ as Garrett called. He had given us several questions asking us various things about our relationship to dance, how we would feel if it was taken away from us, etc. From our answers, we chose words that stuck out to us and created gestures for each of them.”

She continues, “Some of the words represented in my solo are ‘music personified,’ ‘transcend,’ ‘conduit,’ ‘express,’ ‘angry’ and ‘can’t.’ From that starting point we, Garrett and I, adjusted certain transitions and gesture intentions to then reflect the objective of the piece and that worked with the musicality of the track.”

Reflecting on her time with Smith, Storey says, “It was truly a wonderful experience for me. Not only was his movement and musicality natural to me, but I also loved the purpose of the piece. It really opened my eyes to how other cultures view dance and performing arts, and how blessed I am to have the opportunity to pursue it as my career.”

She adds, “I try to channel all of those feelings when doing his piece and I’m honored to perform this work for those who aren’t able to.”

> This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Spring Celebration Series

Dance Vibes

 

Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Jasmine White-Killins on revealing a new layer of herself in Darrell Grand Moutrie’s Execution of a Sentiment, part of the Spring Celebration Series.

Dallas — A recent video posted to Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s (DBDT) Facebook page (seen above) caught my eye for it sheds a new light on company dancer Jasmine White-Killins who, in the clip, is practicing her adagio solo in choreographer Darrell Grand Moultrie’s new work, Execution of a Sentiment. Known for her powerful technical execution and poised stage presence, White-Killins surprised me with her quiet control and raw vulnerability.

I reached out to White-Killins to find out more about Moultrie’s new piece, which premieres at DBDT’s Spring Celebration Series, May 17-19, at the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre. The jam-packed program also includes Jamal Story’s aerial duet What to Say: Notes on Echo and Narcissus; a new work by DBDT company member Claude Alexander III entitled A Tender Pardon; and a performance from special guests Ballet Hispánico.

Originally from Cincinnati, White-Killins moved to Dallas after high school to attend Southern Methodist University where she earned a B.F.A. in dance performance and a minor in Arts Management. Her dance training has also included The Ailey School, Martha Graham School and the Cincinnati Ballet Academy. White-Killins performed two seasons with DBDT: ENCORE! before joining DBDT where she has spent the last four seasons.

“It was a very refreshing thing to do. It feels almost like meditation,” White-Killins says about performing the short solo. “And I owe a lot of that ability to Darrell because he was very good at looking at each dancer and accepting where ever you were at that moment.”

Photo: Brian Guilliaux
Jasmine White-Killins

She continues, “He said I needed to just center myself and kind of find my inner strength and my vulnerability and being okay with going to that place. So, when I do the solo I always get very emotional because it really makes me look inward.”

While White-Killins makes every move in the solo look effortless she tells me that getting it to this point was harder than she initially thought. She explains, “There are a couple of moments were he has me holding some very technical balances like a passé or arabesque, but he’s like ‘just hold it and get to it with no wobbles and no shakes. Just be there.’ And I think that as a professional I got this and then you get up there and try to do it with all the emotion and you realize that you are not as strong as you thought,” she laughingly says.

One of the most challenging moments in the solo is where White-Killins is balancing on one leg and then she has to drop her body three times without wobbling. As for how she accomplishes this feat White-Killins says, “Darrell said you have to be invested so much in that space and that weight that you’re going down to, which is just taking you into a deeper and deeper place. And so, once I started to look at it from that perspective it’s so much easier to get wrapped up in that. And when I do it now I just feel so right there!”

Overall, White-Killins says it was a very refreshing experience working with Moultrie again. She had the pleasure of working with him in high school and then later at The Ailey School. “He treats us very much so like individuals and he was very clear that he wanted each person to express their individuality and that no one is going to look like the other person.”

She continues, “The experience was just eye opening for us. He literally gave us so many technical notes, but also just notes about being interested in what we are doing. He said that as artists and professional dancers it’s our responsibility to figure out what each step means and what each step represents. Even down to the smallest gesture. He was very big on that.”

She adds, “He also had us focus a lot on showing emotion through your body and not so much in your face. A lot of times he would tell us that our face is doing all this stuff, but he wasn’t seeing that in our body. So he was very big on the vocabulary coming through the movement and not necessarily putting it on like we would do in more theatrical pieces.”

White-Killins describes the work as physical demanding with a concept that doesn’t follow a particular narrative or chronological order. “There isn’t just one sentiment being shown. There are lots of sentiments being shown in the three sections of the work. We start out moving big and fast, which leads into an adagio section and then the pace picks up again.”

As for the feeling of the piece White-Killins says, “I think everybody is very individual and their journey is something completely different. Everybody’s path is different.”

She adds, “When Darrell taught us the movement he would always start out by saying ‘so the feeling is’ and then he would do all this movement and it would happen single time. So we would always start with the feeling of it and everybody’s feelings and steps were completely different.”

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Q&A: Daniel Ezralow

The world-renowned choreographer on breaking dance traditions using movement and visual arts and his company’s Dallas debut on the TITAS Presents series.

Daniel Ezralow’s Open. Photo: Angelo Redaelli/Ezralow Dance

Dallas — Since its inception in 2014, Ezralow Dance has garnered a reputation both in the U.S. and abroad for its explosive physicality, original thought and playful humor, which all stem from the mind of artistic director and choreographer, Daniel Ezralow. The Los Angeles-based company is comprised of nine dancers performing works that mingle contemporary dance with humor, provocative ideas and impressive video projections. The company also aims to collaborate with performers, composers, visual artists and filmmakers to transport audiences to new dimensions, exploring and questioning the ideas of dance and humanity, according the Company’s website.

Ezralow’s performance résumé reads like a who’s who of contemporary dance. He has danced with 5×2 Plus, MOMIX, the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company and Paul Taylor Dance Company. Throughout his career Ezralow has created 15 original dance theatre plays, including PearlFlying Bodies, Soaring Souls and a reinterpretation of Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring.

His work has also been seen in Julie Taymor’s film Across the Universe, Cirque du Soleil’s Love and in the opening ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.

His most recent show Open, had its U.S. premiere at the Wallis Annenberg Center in Los Angeles in 2016 and is also the program the Company will be presenting in Dallas, March 29-30, at the Moody Performance Hall. Described as surprising, comical and fun, Open is a series of dynamic vignettes that are woven together using classical music, inventive concepts, playful movement and striking visuals

TheaterJones asks Ezralow about creating movement for film and theater, collaborating with his dancers and what audiences can expect to see this weekend.

 

TheaterJones: How would you describe Open, the work you will be presenting in Dallas this weekend?

Photo: MSA
Daniel Ezralow

Daniel Ezralow: You’re obviously going to see movement. You’re going to see fun concepts paired with classical music. And you’re going to see a fun show that is available to everybody. So I try to in a sense demystify the work and not put it up on a pedestal. I think it has to really play for everyone. Those who love dance and those who have never seen dance before as well.

 

So many contemporary choreographers today choose to go deep and heavy with their work. What made you want to create something light and humorous?

Generally speaking, choreographers today take themselves too seriously. Everyone is important in this world, including the janitor, the trash collector and the street sweeper. Everyone is important and they’re as important to appreciate your work as a well-developed artist who has been around the world or someone whose graduate summa cum laude from a university. I think it’s really important that we pay attention to everybody because as artists our responsible is to somehow have a positive effect on the world.

So, sometimes I get a little fed up, as you do, with the doom and gloom and the seriousness and the politicization of contemporary work. And I say you know what? I would just like everyone to really get their money’s worth. In other words, they have to come to the show and reach into their pocket to buy a ticket and spend 75 minutes of their life watching what I do on stage. I would like them to walk out feeling inspired. Feeling happy. Feeling a sense of joy. And I say this a lot and it’s a silly thing, but just that they want to live another day of their life because what’s important is that we inspire. And this work was very much meant to be that. I was meant to be accessible and that pretty much anybody could come a watch it and they wouldn’t have to say ‘oh, what does that mean?’ I just want them to accept it and get it.

 

There’s a fine line between comical and cheesy. In Open how did you keep from going over the top with the humor?

I think of it as more ironic than anything else. In my life I feel like I am very respectful of everybody, but I am respectful in a way to the rules in order to break them. So there is a big part of me that wants to look at something and if the rules are not working then I want to show people that it can be broken. I want to show that there is irony behind the rule. So a lot of the humor that I play with it really comes from my childhood. In my childhood I felt capable of joking around. There’s times that I do see my work and I think ‘Oh my God’ that’s just too silly. And then other times I see the dancers uplift the choreography to the point where I say “Wow they pulled it off!”

You see, I get overjoyed when I see someone walking down the street and they start jumping up and down on the sidewalk. Usually children and puppies do that, but adults never do that. So to see someone so overjoyed that they jump up and down is a very unique ironic break our society. And I think that is an important thing to see all the time. In a way I am very serious with the humor I use. But I believe also there is a very powerful thing that you can say once you make someone laugh.

 

Do you typically collaborate with the dancers during the creative process?

I am always collaborative. I come in with a strong idea, but I don’t actually believe that I can make anyone believe anything or do anything. So, both with the dancers and the audience I let the audience have the final word. I don’t want to tell them they’re supposed to believe what I am saying. If they believe it I am really happy and if they don’t then I need to work on my work.

It’s the same with my dancers. You see, I never believed that the dancer was just a color that the artist paints with. I think the color has an energy to it. I think dancers have their own unique energy. Ultimately, I think from a long time ago when I founded MOMIX with Moses Pendleton the whole belief system was that the dance is greater than the dancer and the dancer is greater than the choreography. Meaning to say that inside of our bodies we have dance. We are born with it. We keep moving our bodies because moving your body is what keeps you young and what keeps the flow of life going through you.

So, I believe that the dance is inside of you. The choreography is designed for which to hold the dancer or which to hold the dance. The dance is like a Greek spirit. It’s beyond all of us. And then the dancer takes that energy into their body and then the choreographer takes the energy of the body of the dancer and decides to organize it in a certain way.

So, I don’t really feel that at any point choreography should be stronger than the person performing it. In that sense I try to involve the dancers from a very early stage.

 

What type of dancers do you like to work with?

For a long time when I did commissions on companies and I tended to gravitate toward the black sheep. I wanted the dancer that the director told me was trouble and to not work with them, but that was the person I wanted to work with. Because they always had some unique issues right under the surface and that gave me fantastic material to work with.

And with my own company there is a lot of turnover, but only because my company is a project-based company. So, when we have a show we get together, but they all work commercially as well. I tend to like dancers who can do a music video or T.V. show and then they come and do concert work. I feel those dancers are very well-rounded. But the dancers I am working with, I call them all the time and some of them have been working with me for more than 10 years.

 

How hard is it for you to switch gears from concert work to commercial work?

Even when we were doing MOMIX, David Bowie would call or U2 would call us because they liked the work we were doing. So I wouldn’t call it commercial. You could come at that work from a commercial point of view or you could come at it from an artistic point of view. And I always come at it from artistic even when I did films like The Grinch with Ron Howard. That still is an artistic project for me. All the commercial things I do like Television even in Italy. Though seemingly it looks like just a TV show, I always try to change the dynamic and change the parameter to feel more artistic and that’s what I love about it.

So I kind of hop skip and jump between film, TV, Broadway, commercial work and artistic work, and because I am flexible in my mind I don’t see that it’s a problem. I’m sure for some people it would be a big problem. But my mind is flexible and these are very different worlds. The timing on an artistic project is not at all the timing on a Television project. In Television you have to move fast. You have to change fast. And you have to be willing to give up your idea and compromise all the time. Whereas with an artistic project you’re really backing your idea. So, I just shift with the projects and I don’t see that it’s difficult.

This Q&A was posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: LakeCities Ballet Theater’s Coppelia

Dancing Dolls

LakeCities Ballet Theatre serves up another kid-friendly ballet with Coppelia, featuring special guest Steven Loch at MCL Grand Theater in Lewsiville.

LakeCities Ballet Theatre Presents Coppelia. Photo: Nancy Loch Photography.

Lewisville — As I watched LakeCities Ballet Theatre (LBT) rehearse Act 1 of Coppelia Artistic Director Kelly Kilburn Lannin leaned over and whispered how this particular section of music always reminds her about the time their Franz injured himself mid-performance and Steven Loch, who was 12 at the time, was asked to step in and danced the final part of show perfectly.

Later, when I mentioned this story to Loch in the breakroom where we sat down to talk he laughed and says he gets acknowledged quite often for his ability to jump into roles at the last second—a skill that he says he learned from Lannin and her team at the Ballet Conservatory in Lewisville.

“There is so much supply and not enough demand so the high level of excellence gets even more exaggerated,” Loch says about what it takes today to become a professional ballet dancer. “You have to be the most valuable worker to have the best shot, and I think one of the great things about here is Kelly knew that from the beginning. She knew that if you want to make it as a dancer than you’re going to have to learn to do it all.”

Photo: Pacific Northwest Ballet
Steven Loch

He adds, “And also too, the standard that she puts on students are so high and you know have to hit those standards because there’s no forgiveness. Then, when you go the professional world you have good habits. You’re disciplined. You’re a good worker. You’re a professional and you’re a good human. And it’s actually surprising how valuable that is. And Kelly’s standard is such that even for understudies you have to be able to jump in and do it perfectly so that no one notices or you are going to be in trouble.”

But in the same breath Loch also says Lannin is very nurturing, which I saw firsthand during one of the company’s Coppelia rehearsals a couple of weeks ago. “She is so sweet and loving and gives so much of herself,” Loch says. “She gave me so much love and not only cared about me as a dancer, but also a person. She was my mentor growing up and she taught me everything in order to be ready for the professional world.”

After graduating from high school in 2009, Loch joined the professional program at Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB). He joined the company in 2011 and was promoted to corps de ballet in 2012. He was promoted to soloist at the end of last season. Throughout his career with PNB Loch has returned home on numerous occasions to perform leading roles in LBT’s productions, including DraculaGiselleThe Nutcracker and Coppelia.

As for his reasons for returning, Loch says, “This place is my home and it has given me so much so I definitely want to return the favor.”

He continues, “I also get called in to do the leading roles, which when I was younger I didn’t get the opportunities to do. It also gives me more practice and experience in these roles so when I start performing lead roles in Seattle I will be more ready.”

Regarding his reaction to the news of his promotion last season, Loch says, “When I got promoted to soloist it was really satisfying because I had put so much work into it and to see the fruits of your labor turn in to something like this just felt really special.”

He adds, “As dancers we are all perfectionists so earning this title has also definitely given me more confidence.”

Watching Loch jump into rehearsal after just stepping off a plane I couldn’t help but wonder what he does to help prevent injury and illness. On this topic Loch says, “Recovery is so important so anything that can help me speed up recovery is great. I do cryotherapy. I have Norma Tec boots. I do a lot of stretching and roll out using a roller. I also do massage and work with this lady who does Trager Approach in addition to neuromuscular therapy.”

Of all the recovery methods that he uses Loch says the cryotherapy has been the most effective for him. “It’s so much more efficient than icing because you are put in such a cold environment that the blood goes to your core instead of your extremities. So it’s more nutrient rich, and it only takes three minutes, and you are able to move afterwards, so you can do it before working out or after working out. And it makes you recover three times faster than you normally would so, for me that has been a huge game changer.”

You can check out Loch in LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s rendition of Coppelia, March 29-31, at the Medical City of Lewisville Grand Theater in Lewisville.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.