Tag Archives: Danielle Georgiou

Free Dance Performances at NorthPark!

mistletoe magic
Austin Sora and David Escoto in Bruce Wood Dance’s Mistletoe Magic. Photo: Lynn Lane

Around the Holidays the NorthPark Mall in Dallas turns into a zoo thanks to the upscale mall’s unique holiday attractions which include Santa Claus, the trains and Sights and Sounds of the Season, which is a FREE performance series featuring the musical and movement stylings of schools, churches, synagogues and community and professional dance troupes from around North Texas. The performance series runs Nov. 28 through Dec. 22nd and the Dillards’ Court and North Court and again this is FREE!!!

With two little ones at home I am well versed with the trains and Santa Claus attractions at the mall, but I am a little embarrassed to admit that I have never stopped to watch any of the dance performances presented by the many well-known professional and pre-professional companies in the area. That is going to change this year especially since the only way to see Bruce Wood Dance’s Mistletoe Magic will be through this performance series. (Bruce Wood Dance performs tomorrow at 1pm in the North Court area.)

Looking at the performance line up online, I am amazed with the number of dance companies both professional and pre-professional that will be presenting in these 30-60 time slots as well as the variety of movement styles that will be showcased. I mean this Saturday alone starting at 10am you can catch some of the most popular names in the Dallas dance community, including 8&1 Dance Company, Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico, Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, Bruce Wood Dance, Dark Circles Contemporary Dance, Danielle Georgiou Dance Group and Contemporary Ballet Dallas.

les fairies
Dark Circles Contemporary Dance in Les Fairies. Photo: Chadi El-khoury

After checking in with some of these companies on social media, I can tell you that Dark Circles Contemporary Dance will perform Joshua L. Peugh’s Les Fairies as well as a section of a new work that Peugh is planning to introduce in the spring. OK! that alone has me hooked! Danielle Georgiou Dance Group will also give us a sneak peek of a new creation and perform Colby Calhoun’s Bedtime Stories. And Contemporary Ballet Dallas will perform to some holiday classics along with the school’s student ballet, tap and hip hop youth ensembles.

bedtime stories
Colby Calhoun’s Bedtime Stories. Photo courtesy of Danielle Georgiou Dance Group

And while I have already included a link to the full line up, I wanted to pull out some special dates for all you dance lovers out there so you can go ahead and mark your calendars:

Dec. 2

Dallas Black Dance Theatre Academy Performance Ensembles

Dec. 5

The Hockaday School Dance Department

Dec. 9

Texas Ballet Theater Dallas School

Collin County Ballet Theatre

Chamberlain School of Ballet

Avant Chamber Ballet

Dec. 16

The Ballet Conservatory

Bombshell Dance Project

Dallas Ballet Company

I hope to see you all there!!! Get there early to find a parking spot and claim a front row seat!

 

 

 

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Dallas DanceFest Profile: DGDG

chatter
Colby Calhoun in Chatter from DGDG. Photo: Lynn Lane

Here is the first of several profiles I am doing on companies performing at this year’s Dallas DanceFest. This one was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

Dallas — Since stepping on to the Dallas arts scene six years ago Danielle Georgiou has had the opportunity to present her work in some pretty interesting spaces, including warehouses, art galleries, Klyde Warren Park, the Wyly Theatre, Hamon Hall, Bath House Cultural Center and the theater at Eastfield College. As one of the performance companies chosen to present at this year’s Dallas DanceFest (DFF), Georgiou will soon get to add Moody Performance Hall to this eclectic list of venues. “I have never presented any of my work on this stage before so, I am looking forward to this new experience and working with the facility’s technical and production crews. It will be interesting to see what happens.”

Created in 2014 under the guidance of arts patron Gayle Halperin and the Dance Council of North Texas, DDF strives to provide local and regional dance performance companies with the opportunity to showcase their work to a wider audience base while also giving them the chance to connect with their peers and experience work outside their own genres. This includes Georgiou’s own dance theater style, as she calls it, which is influenced by German choreographer Pina Bausch’s Tanztheater performance style and those of modern dance pioneers Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham and Paul Taylor. Together with her creative partner Justin Locklear, Georgiou has been able to produce work that is frank in nature, uninhibited in movement quality and thoroughly entertaining.

Regarding the couple’s working relationship Georgiou says, “Justin has brought out in me a new understanding of my own creative process. He constantly pushes and challenges me, and he is not afraid to ask the questions that I don’t really want to answer. He has given my work a particular context that wouldn’t necessarily be there without him.”

For DDF 2017 Danielle Georgiou Dance Group (DGDG) member Colby Calhoun will be performing, Chatter, a solo work Georgiou created for him two years ago. “Colby and I have a special connection in that we both have the same approach to dance making and other creative artistic processes, and we can understand each other without actually communicating.” She adds, “I was very lucky to find somebody who is also willing to throw themselves physically into movement, because as a performer my comfort area is to physically assert myself in order to find what the choreography is supposed to be, and Colby works much like me in that regard.”

An extremely physical work, Georgiou says the movement in Chatter represents the ongoing dialogue and many voices she hears inside her head all the time. “I find that my body and mind have a hard time resting and that is where Chatter started from, which was dealing with the push and pull of daily life and finding moments to try and quiet down, but never really being able to and just having this internal struggle with myself.” Georgiou adds that creating the piece was a cathartic experience for both her and Calhoun. “It felt good getting it out of my system and Colby has even said that after he performs it he feels relieved that he finished it. Watching him perform the piece, it’s a different experience each time.”

As far as what Georgiou is most looking forward to at this year’s DDF she says, “I know the festival’s audience base is going to be very different from our audience base so, I am interested to see what their reactions are to the type of work I make. A lot of times people are not sure what type of work I make so, I think this will be a great way for people to find out that yes I make dance, but I also make theater.” She adds, “And maybe this will encourage them to want to see some of the other works that we do that is this collaboration between different genres, and maybe it will help expand their knowledge of what dance can be. That it doesn’t have to be something very classical and traditional in nature. That it can explore new realms of movement and story.”

» Dallas DanceFest is 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 2; and 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 3, at Moody Performance Hall in the Dallas Arts District. Performances are:

 

8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 2

  • Ballet Ensemble of Texas
  • Ballet Frontier of Texas
  • Dallas Black Dance Theatre
  • Danielle Georgiou Dance Group
  • Dark Circles Contemporary Dance
  • Indique Dance Company
  • Kat Barragan Dance
  • LakeCities Ballet Theatre
  • NobleMotion Dance
  • SMU Meadows Dance Ensemble
  • Texas Ballet Theater
  • Uno Más
  • Wanderlust Dance Project

 

3:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 3

  • AJ Garcia-Rameau
  • Arden Leone Dance Company
  • Bruce Wood Dance
  • Center for Ballet Arts
  • Contemporary Ballet Dallas
  • Dallas Ballet Company
  • DBDT:Encore!
  • Dallas Youth Repertory Project
  • Granadans
  • imPULSE Dance Project
  • Rhythm In Fusion Festival
  • Royale Ballet Dance Academy
  • Rhythmic Souls
  • Texas Ballet Theater School

 

» More information about Dallas DanceFest is available at www.thedancecouncil.org

Review: Donkey Beach, Danielle Georgiou Dance Group

Danielle Georgiou Dance Group captures the essence of the 1960s’ beach movies in Donkey Beach, part of AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Elevator Project.

Donkeybeach
Danielle Georgiou Dance Group in Donkey Beach. Photo: Mark Lowry

Dallas — As an artist Danielle Georgiou has always been a rule breaker. Looking over her portfolio of work these last few years, which includes Dirty Filthy Diamonds, NICE, and The Show About Men, you will notice that the only time she follows the rules is when she is about to break them. Georgiou is also not shy about addressing social taboo topics such as gender roles, sexual orientation and feminism in her work, but she does it in such a way that you don’t know whether to laugh or cringe. You typically end up doing both at the same time, which is one of the main draws of a Danielle Georgiou Dance Group (DGDG) show. The other being Georgiou’s ability to gather so many gifted local musicians, singers, actors and dancers in one place. This is something no other dance performance company has come close to doing here in Dallas.

Needless to say the expectations were high for DGDG’s newest production Donkey Beach, which premiered this weekend at Hamon Hall in the Winspear Opera House as part of AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Elevator Project. A well-suited collaborative effort among Georgiou, Justin Locklear (music and lyrics) and Ruben Carrazana (script), Donkey Beach is a parody of the 1960s beach party movie genre, which includes films like Gidget (1959), Beach Party (1963), Pajama Party (1964) and Beach Blanket Bingo (1965). Like the movies that inspired it, Donkey Beach seamlessly blends live surf rock played by Locklear, Trey Pendergrass and Cory Kosel (also known as the Beach Bums); popular dance moves at the time such as The Twist, The Shimmy and The Mashed Potato; and meticulously timed dialogue that includes a copious amount of ’60s slang like “can you dig it” and “hang ten” to create one totally awesome beach bash.

Justin Locklear in Donkey Beach. Photo: Mark Lowry

The insanely happy beach vibe is carried throughout the entire production, including the moving sets featuring fabric on wheels which unveil multiple life-size 3D ocean waves, a camp cabin that becomes a lifeguard stand and a small stage in an upstage left corner where the band is situated. Locklear keeps the surfer theme going with the costumes, which feature bold-patterned swim trucks for the men and brightly colored cover-ups for the women. And Lori Honeycutt does a dynamic job with the lighting which transitions from muted purples and flashes of white light in the camp scene to warm yellows and oranges during the beach party.

Known for its borderless performances, DGDG had to get creative when it came to the rectangular-sized space of Hamon Hall as well as the fact the audience would not be on a rake when viewing the show. DGDG solves the first problem right away by having some of the members enter from the back of the room in a militant-styled dance sequence, which welcomed us to Camp Walla Bang-Bang. The 14-member cast wears army green t-shirts over black biking shorts with plastic head pieces that resemble raincoats.

Georgiou uses simple movements such as heavy walking, pivot steps and repetitive arm gestures to represent the campers’ dull and monotonous state of being. As the campers are directed to state their name, bunk number and favorite color, viewers notice that some voices are clear as a bell (Hannah Brake, William Acker, Curtis Green and Carrazana) while others, including De’Ja Farr, Omar Padilla and Colby Calhoun, are harder to hear due to the speed at which they speak—they all adjust this by the next scene.

The second problem of the people in the back not being able to see some of the action up front is addressed by Locklear, who describes the action the same way a sports caster would—so not to exclude anyone from the fun.

Locklear and the band are the glue that holds the show together. Locklear sets the mood in his opening monologue, which is a combination of Dick Clark, Humphrey Bogart and Vincent Price rolled into one as he tells audiences how Donkey Beach came into existence. It started with an enchantress and evil gin (or genie), Locklear says with a wicked smile and a wink. To sum it up the two creatures get together and then break up, and in his heartbroken state the genie banishes the enchantress to the sea, but not before she turns him into a donkey. In order to cope with his new image, the donkey creates a place at the end of the world where the sun is always shining and the party never stops. Locklear’s delivery is kind of creepy yet inviting, with a hypnotic cadence that the audience can’t help but follow.

Georgiou’s modern dance background and tanztheater influences are scattered throughout the show, including the fluid body shapes and springy footwork of Gabe King, Green and Calhoun in one of their trios and Debbie Crawford and Matthew Clark’s jerky body isolations after drinking out of a bottle containing rain water. She even makes dancing bushes appear musical and exciting. Georgiou has a knack for tackling issues like such gender roles in non-confrontational ways with the aid of irony and humor. An example would be when Carrazana rubs up on the lifeguard (Brian Witkowicz) dressed in grass skirt, coconut bra and blonde wig as Witkowicz sings about young, soft bodies in bikinis.

Spoiler Alert: Near the end it is revealed that Witkowicz is the donkey and he must be punished for tricking the teenagers into drinking his magic water and basically brainwashing them to be happy all the time. Becki McDonald’s hauntingly beautiful solo (she’s wearing a seahorse mask; both it and the donkey mask, designed by Locklear, are fantastic) is a sweet note in the show as the performers manipulate strips of blue fabric stretched across the stage while she sings about coming out of the water. The dialogue between McDonald and Witkowicz hits home when he mentions the terrors and tragedies happening across the world as well as more personal tragedies such as heartbreak and rejection. And this is where Georgiou’s twist happens—but you’ll have to see it to find out what happens.

You can still see Donkey Beach today at 2 or 8 p.m. at Hamon Hall in the Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center.

<<This review was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

 

Preview: Danielle Georgiou Dance Group’s Donkey Beach

Postcard from Donkey Beach. Photo: Frank Robertson/DGDG

Danielle Georgiou Dance Group returns to its zany storylines and feminist roots in Donkey Beach, part of  AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Elevator Project.

Dallas — Over the last six years Danielle Georgiou has made a name for herself in the Dallas arts community for her unique collaborations with local singers, actors and musicians as well as for putting out work that is real and relevant and always pack a punch. Her use of originxal music, tanztheater (expressionist dance) and dark humor to bring attention to taboo topics such as gender roles, sexual orientation and feminism is both disconcerting and engaging at the same time. You can see all these elements at work in Danielle Georgiou Dance Group’s (DGDG) newest production, Donkey Beach, which premieres June 22-25 at Hamon Hall in the Winspear Opera House as part of AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Elevator Project.

Inspired by the beach party movies of the 1960s featuring Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, Georgiou and her team, including Justin Locklear and Ruben Carrazana, have created a similar setting where the sun always shines, the songs are about bikinis and surf boards and the teenagers say things like “gee whiz” and “cowabunga” while busting out classic ’60s dance moves like The Swim and The Mashed Potato. The concept for the show came to Georgiou while watching Disney’s Teen Beach 2 one evening. “I really liked the idea of being transported to a different time and place,” Georgiou says. “I also love the ’60s because it was the first time that women really had a voice in society and were comfortable in their own skin.” Georgiou adds that she’s also a fan of the femme fatale characters in the movies from the ’40s and ’50s.

The structure of the show is a musical with songs and dances woven in between dialogue and modern dance techniques such as weight sharing, concaved body shapes and pedestrian movements. “This is definitely a musical, but it doesn’t have the typical happily ever after at the end. I mean boy meets girl and the two of them kind of fall in love, but then everything starts to fall apart. There is no happy ending in this musical.” Georgiou doesn’t tell me this to spoil the ending of the run through I was about to see of Donkey Beach at Eastfield College in Dallas last Saturday afternoon. Actually, Locklear alludes to this fact multiple times in his opening monologue, which explains how Donkey Beach came into existence.

To sum it up, a seahorse enchantress and an evil gin—“it’s an evil genie,” band member Trey Pendergrass shouts out multiple times throughout the show—had a falling out and in her anger the enchantress turned the genie into a donkey. Heartbroken and looking like a literal ass the donkey creates a magical place where everyone is happy all the time. Locklear and the band then lead us into the opening scene, which depicts a bunch a miserable teenagers at a summer camp where it rains all the time. With Locklear’s urging the lead characters Jimmy (Matt Clark) and Susie (Debbie Crawford) drink from a bottle of donkey water that then opens up the portal to Donkey Beach. You can definitely draw some parallels between this story and that of William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, which also includes magical beings and a remote island.

The music for the show has a Beach Boys vibe with lyrics about bikinis, surf boards and beach parties, which will be performed live by Locklear (vocals and bass guitar), Pendergrass (percussion) and Cory Kosel (vocals and guitar). Like all of Georgiou’s productions, she uses these original tunes as a means to poke fun at specific societal norms and stereotypes with the ultimate goal of opening up the audiences’ eyes to certain issues in a non-threatening and usually ridiculously funny way. An example would be Crawford’s solo with a ukulele, “because of course she can play the ukulele,” Pendergrass states as he brings the instrument over to her. The song starts off light about young love, but then turns heavy when she questions why society makes excuses for men when it comes to domestic abuse and how society typically looks the other way when it happens. The song ends and the performers are quiet for a minute, allowing for the viewers to absorb the message, before Will Acker jumps up and says, “Dude you killed the mood. This is a bonfire!” With that cue the band starts playing and dance madness ensues. You also have to appreciate the irony of Carrazana portraying a woman complete with a grass skirt and coconut bra in a movie genre known for its plastic images.

Later in the show you will notice the performers make vague references about world events such as mass tragedies and natural disasters as well as smaller, more personal tragedies. When asked why she didn’t name specific tragedies like the recent bombing in Manchester, England, Georgiou responded that she didn’t want to limit the show to just the here and now. “I want it to represent all time periods, not just what is happening today. I want the show to mean something in a universal way.”

Georgiou loosely describes the show as having three acts: the first being the gloomy camp scene where we meet the teenage characters; the second on Donkey Beach where the characters are transformed into 1960s talking and dancing beach kids; and the final scene between the enchantress and the donkey, which Georgiou says contains the meat of the show. “This is where the bottom just drops out of the show. Everything before this is just pretense.” I don’t want to give the twist away, but I left the rehearsal pondering to myself if given a choice would I rather live in miserable reality or in a joyful lie.

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: War Flower, Danielle Georgiou Dance Group

Hive Minded

Danielle Georgiou Dance Group uses movement, text and original music to depict the democratic nature of honeybees in the new work War Flower at the Bath House Cultural Center.

warflower-dgdg
War Flower from Danielle Georgiou Dance Group. Photo: Steven Visneau

Dallas — “Unsettling” was the first word that came to mind as I watched Danielle Georgiou Dance Group (DGDG) rehearse War Flower, Georgiou’s latest theatrical dance work, which explores the inner workings of animal societies such as honeybees for insights into the human condition, at the Bath House Cultural Center in Dallas last Friday evening. The heavy electronic beat Donovan Jones plays in the beginning helps set the pace for performer Stephanie Cleghorn Jasso’s passion-filled monologue, which starts with the line “The bees came in the summer of two thousand and whatever.”

Dressed in a modest, floor-length cream dress with a wreath of flowers on top her head, Jasso moves purposely around the minimally adorned space (strips of artificial grass, white plastic chairs and a whole wall decorated in vines with “The Hive” spelled out in twinkling lights) as she tells the story of man’s creation using verses from the Bible. She finishes up by saying “welcome home,” which was the cue for the other 15 performers, all dressed in soft, floral-printed tops and dresses, to come in running and screaming like cavemen. The primitive movement, i.e. concaved shapes, heavy tailbones, rolling and crawling around on all fours, is right in Georgiou’s wheelhouse, along with theatrics, videography and soundscape.

War Flower from Danielle Georgiou Dance Group. Photo: Steven Visneau

War Flower is Georgiou’s grandest production to date with a cast of 19, including Georgiou, sound specialist Donovan Jones, conceptual designer Justin Locklear and lighting designer Lori Honeycutt, and also features a number of moving parts, including live music, video and small machinery. When asked about the large cast Georgiou says, “I wanted a large cast for the work to help visually build the idea of a community and demonstrate the rituals acts in the piece.” As for performing in her own work, something she hasn’t done in the last couple of years, Georgiou says that was a natural decision.

“When I started working on movement for War Flower in February of 2016 for the faculty dance concert at Eastfield College, I was working with a cast of four dancers, and I slowly began to find myself in the piece with them. Then when it became time to bring in the full cast for the premiere production it just made sense to remain a part of the show. As a dancer I was intimately connected with the work and I almost couldn’t take myself away from it.”

Back to the rehearsal. After the caveman dance, Dallas actor, director and playwright Ruben Carrazana steps forward and begins explaining the finer points of being a honeybee, including the fact that they live to die, to newcomer Vinay Naik. And similar to how Virgil leads Dante through the nine circles of hell, Carrazana then leads Naik through the social and political hierarchy of honeybees while also touching on some of the most controversial human belief systems in the U.S., including Catholicism, Scientology and the Democratic Parties.

Georgiou is known for tackling controversial topics such as sexuality and gender roles in ironic and poignant ways and War Flower appears to be no different in this aspect. Her clever use of metaphors and pop culture references allow viewers to enjoy the show even when their politics don’t align. For example, the text she uses in the show includes sections from The Bible, The Federalist Papers, John Milton’s Paradise Lost, Thomas Paine’s Common Sense as well as lyrics from popular Jay-Z and Nicki Minaj songs. Her decision to center the piece around the lifecycle of honeybees stems from her readings of Honeybee Democracy by animal behaviorist Thomas D. Seeley. Part of the book synopsis reads, “Honeybees make decisions collectively and democratically. Every year, faced with the life-or-death problem of choosing and traveling to a new home, honeybees stake everything on a process that includes collective fact-finding, vigorous debate and consensus building.”

Georgiou describes these tenets through a series of repetitive movement phrases that are executed singularly and collectively while someone is reciting text or performing a ritualistic action such as administering the Kool-Aid to a new cult member. There is also a scene where Carrazana asks Naik a list of yes or no questions in a rapid fire manner while Georgiou checks Naik’s body for signs of stress. This scene is eerily similar to the auditing sessions I recently saw on Alex Gibney’s HBO documentary Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, which Georgiou did confirm later was her inspiration for the section. She also told me that she got the list of questions from a personality test for Scientologists and a questionnaire that determines your political party, both of which she found online.

Most of the movement in War Flower is simplistic in nature – a lot of pedestrian walking and gesturing, pivoting body isolations and loose hips – but when performed in unison by the group easily captures the essence of the hive mind mentality. Georgiou explains, “For me, the hive mind mentality occurs when a group of people come to the same thought at the same time. Or when people act in unison without any foresight, communication or practice. It’s something instinctual and real. It’s a raw response; a decision made from the heart and gut, not the head.”

She continues, “It’s the group mind at work and that’s what really interested me. How we can make decisions in our hive without ever talking or without ever really knowing each other. It’s both terrifying and enticing. How we act in unison with our social groups, our friend groups, our families, without ever really being aware of where the initial inspiration came from.”

War Flower runs Jan 19-21 and 26-28, at the Bath House Cultural Center in Dallas.

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Q&A: Jonathon Young, Electric Company Theatre

The ensemble of Betroffenheit. Photo: Wendy D Photography

The director of Electric Company Theatre on working with Choreographer Crystal Pite to explore the effects of PTSD in Kidd Pivot’s Betroffenheit, presented by  TITAS at Dallas City Performance Hall.

 

Dallas — Audiences are in for something different when TITAS presents two of Canada’s most groundbreaking performing arts companies, Kidd Pivot and Electric Company Theatre, in a one-of-a-kind dance theatre experience this Thursday and Friday evening at Dallas City Performance Hall. The name of the work, Betroffenheit,is a German word that describes the shock or bewilderment that often follows in the wake of a violent or distressing event. In English it is loosely translated to mean “shock” or “a loss for words.” By combining text, design, story and dance, renowned choreographer Crystal Pite and Electric Company Theatre Artistic Director Jonathon Young hope to heighten the emotional state of their audiences as it pertains to the troubling aspects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The 120-minute work also features strobe-like effects, non-toxic theatrical haze, adult themes and coarse language.

Crystal Pite is a Canadian choreographer best known for her keen wit, brazen movement choices and theatrical flair. A former company member of Ballet British Columbia and William Forsythe’s Ballet Frankfurt, Pite made her choreographic debut in 1990, and since then has created more than 40 works for dance companies all around the globe, including Nederlands Dans Theatre, The National Ballet of Canada and Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet, to name a few. Pite is associate choreographer of Nederlands Dans Theatre I and Associate Dance Artist of Canada’s National Arts Centre. She was also appointed associate artist at Sadler’s Wells in London in 2013. Since 2002 her dance troupe, Kidd Pivot, has been racking up critical acclaim both nationally and internationally with its unique blending of classical and contemporary movements, breathtaking physicality and strong theatrical sensibility.

Jonathon Young is a Canadian actor best known for his role of Nikola Tesla on the SyFy show Sanctuary. His other acting credits include The Fog, Eureka and Stargate Atlantis. He is a graduate of the Studio 58 theatre school at Langara College and is a multiple Jessie Richardson Theatre Award Winner. Young is currently the artistic director of the Vancouver-based Electric Company Theatre, which he formed alongside fellow theatre school peers Kim Collier, David Hudgins and Kevin Kerr in 1996. What started out as a creative outlet for these young actors, directors and playwrights has quickly grown into one of Canada’s leading creators of live theatre. Over the last two decades Electric Company Theatre has created 21 original productions, including BetroffenheitTear the Curtain!, No Exit, Studies in Motion, Brilliant! and the feature film The Score. The Company has toured throughout Canada, to the U.S. and the U.K., and is also the co-founder of Progress Lab 1422, a 6,000-square-foot theatre creation space in Vancouver.

TheaterJones asks Jonathon Young about the evolving performing arts scene in Vancouver, coming up with the concept for Betroffenheit and bringing all the visual and technical elements together with the help of Crystal Pite.

Tiffany Tregarthen and Jonathon Young in Betroffenheit. Photo: Michael Slobodian

TheaterJones: What does Betroffenheit mean? How did you come up with the concept for the production?

Jonathon Young: I found the word in a book called “Then We Act” by American Theatre Artist Anne Bogart. Betroffenheit is a German word that describes a state of being in the wake of a traumatic event.  In English we say “shock” or “speechless” or “being at a loss for words.” In Anne Bogart’s definition of the word she said it’s “a fertile and palpable silence….where language ceases and only the limits of language can be taken in.” So, on one level the word describes a tension between speech and action, which seemed perfect for a dance/theatre hybrid. Also, because there is no equivalent word in English, because it doesn’t translate, it seemed a very good title for a show about PTSD. It’s a big, mysterious word; bewildering and foreign, and that’s one of the troubling aspects of post-traumatic stress disorder: people who suffer from it feel “outside” life, they become cut off from others, it feels foreign and it’s very hard to describe to others what’s happening. I’ve never had it though, this is all from my research.

Can Dallas audiences expect to be taken on a more sensory or emotional journey during the production?

I would hope that the show would provide both a sensory and emotional experience for audience members. It is a personal and human story with thrilling technical elements.

All art forms struggle to find a balance between artistic expression and general accessibility. Do you think you and Pite found that balance in Betroffenheit? Can you give me a couple of examples?

Audiences who have seen the show so far seem to be “getting it” if that’s what you mean. It’s communicating a very specific story and yet, because it relies heavily on the more abstract expression of pure dance, there is plenty of room for interpretation. We’ve tried to stage the bewildering experience of PTSD, which involves something called “re-experiencing” (basically flashbacks that come without warning and seem very real). We’ve attempted to disorder the narrative structure in the same way that trauma can disorder reality. All this to say that there are some passages of Betroffenheit where an audience member who is expecting a very linear experience might feel lost or confused. But I suspect much of our audience is coming prepared to see a work of contemporary dance, and thus, isn’t going to be looking for a traditional scripted narrative.

Have you worked with Crystal Pite on previous projects? What makes her and her dancers such a good fit for this production?

I have worked with Crystal twice before. Electric Company hired her to do choreography for a play and a feature film that had dance sequences. This is the first time we’ve made something from scratch together. The Kidd Pivot dancers are not only rock star contemporary dancers, they’re also really good actors. I’m in awe of them all. I’d trust them with my life.

How did you and Pite go about blending the story, text, theatrics and movement in the show? Did you have any say when it came to Pite’s choreographic choices and vice versa?

Crystal and I just started talking. I sent her some writing that depicted a kind of dramatic zone disordered by an event in the past. She asked questions, responded with images, thought about design ideas and various characters, and then asked a bunch more questions. I would go away and write some more. Sometimes dialogue, sometimes stage directions that described specific action. We wanted to create a world where language and physicality were two essential halves of one whole. I started recording dialogues I’d written very early on and Crystal started using those recordings as a kind of music for the dancers to move to.  We worked together every step of the way to find the right balance between text, design, story and dance. She collaborated on all the writing and there is even one scene written by her. The choreography is all Crystal, but we talked endlessly about the overall shape and structure, the progression of events. It was probably the most thrilling and daunting collaborations of my career. The material is quite dark, but the process was often quite joyful.

The ensemble of Betroffenheit. Photo: Michael Slobodian

How would you describe the movement inBetroffenheit? Pedestrian? Modern-based? Athletic? Lyrical?

There’s contemporary dance, salsa, tap dancing, clown, soft shoe numbers, slapstick routines, puppetry… and then some straight up acting too.

What led you along with Kim Collier, David Hudgins and Kevin Kerr to form the Electric Company Theatre?

We got out of theatre school in Vancouver in the mid 90’s and had some very specific ideas about what we thought theatre could be, and I guess we felt like we weren’t seeing it being done anywhere, so we decided to do it ourselves. We were young and brimming with energy and ideas, and also the four of us had really different skill sets so together we were able to carve something out of nothing. I really learned to write from Kevin and David. Kim became a director by doing it. We just made it up as we went along. And I guess in many ways we still are.

How competitive is the performing arts scene in Vancouver today?

It’s a relatively small city, so there isn’t a whole bunch of opportunity for actors and directors and designers. A handful of companies to work for, and no real commercial scene to speak of, but there is a strong indie scene and the city still has that kind of DIY spirit that produces a really eclectic, smart, outlandish brand of theatre.

How has the performing arts scene in Vancouver evolved since starting Electric Company Theatre in 1996?

The city is constantly growing and changing. There’s many, many extraordinary artists living here working in visual arts and music and there’s a strong film and television industry. We have a thriving Shakespeare Festival, a fantastic annual performing arts Festival called PUSH that brings in shows from all over the world, and a great annual dance series called Dance House. It’s a cool place to live and produce work, but I also feel that it’s so important to leave, go elsewhere and see what other people are up to.

>> This Q&A was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

>> For more background on the evolution of dance theatre, check out Danielle Georgiou’s most recent Sixth Position column.

Review: The Show About Men, Danielle Georgiou Dance Group

Danielle Georgiou Dance Group picks apart some age-old male stereotypes using song and dance and a balance of darkness and humor in The Show About Men.

The Show About Men from DGDG. Photo: DeAndre Upshaw

Dallas — Man up! Real men Shave! Don’t be a D***! A Barbie is not a boy’s toy!

These are a just a few of the societal catchphrases that Danielle Georgiou and her troupe of artistically gifted performers addressed head on in the reprisal of The Show About Men at the Performance Hall at Eastfield College on Friday evening. After receiving rave reviews at the Festival of Independent Theatres in Dallas last summer,Danielle Georgiou Dance Group (DGDG) decided to bring the show back for this limited engagement and with a few production enhancements including two new songs and additional cast members Ruben Carrazana and Nick Leos who fit right in to this wacky boy’s club.

If you have seen any of Georgiou’s work in the last couple of years, including Dirty Filthy Diamonds and NICE, then you know that you aren’t going to just sit and watch passively from the audience. No, you are going to experience the show right alongside the performers thanks to Georgiou’s artistic philosophy which includes immersing the audience into the environment she and the performers have created, while expressing through dance and theater topics that many may find otherwise unapproachable. The Show About Men doesn’t disappoint in this regard.

Throughout the performance, the men relate stories based on their personal experiences, which range from sexuality, complex relationships with other males (fathers/friends/sons), responsibilities of providing for families or being in positions of authority and permission to be vulnerable, in need of love and to be afraid. These personal stories help make the show more accessible and prevent viewers from passing their own judgments as we were completely captivated by the individuals’ words and body language.

The Show About Men from DGDG. Photo: DeAndre Upshaw

Fear is the motivator in the opening segment as William Acker, Colby Calhoun, Ruben Carrazana, Matthew Clark, Curtis Green, Gabriel King and Nick Leos (sadly DGDG conceptual designer Justin Locklear was unable to perform) repeatedly slapp their thighs, chests and heads while chanting phrases like “Fear! Fear of myself! Fear of rejection! Fear of saying the wrong things!” The phrases are shouted with drill sergeant-intensity and are accompanied with militant walking steps and tense posturing. The mood invoked by their minimal clothing (boxers and thermal tank tops, a.k.a. “wife-beaters”), aggressive gesturing and frantic shouting is at first intimidating. But Georgiou and Locklear once again work their magic and right before the tension becomes too overwhelming the performers suddenly yell “bugs!” and start trembling, releasing the built-up tension in the room.

Georgiou also manipulates the venue to aid in her mission to include the audience into the action. The 30 or so audience members were escorted onstage and behind the red curtain where a gritty bar scene awaited us complete with dingy lighting, a variety of mismatched tables and chairs, a long bar to one side, lone chairs and a piano on the other as well as a large hand-written sign welcoming viewers to Dick’s All Night Bar & Karaoke.

As the less-than-90-minute production unfolded the bar was transformed into a sanctuary of sorts for the seven male performers, allowing them to speak freely about what it means to be a man. In a very candid group conversation the men shouted out their answers to the age old question: what makes a man a man? Answers varied from rational to ridiculous such as when a suggestion that men were “handy around the house” turned into “handsy” as Leos groped himself, and some answers were contradictory, such as that men are both knowledgeable and stupid. The conservation ended with a randy song and dance number that had the men performing numerous pelvic thrusts and booty shakes while colorfully describing the male sex organ to a tune resembling The Hokey Pokey, composed by Trey Pendergrass and Locklear.

Another lighthearted group number had the performers standing up against makeshift urinals discussing the deficiencies of men’s restrooms relative to women’s restrooms which ended in the group singing about a “gender neutral bathroom in the sky.” Carrazana’s magnetic personality and awkward coming-of-age stories regarding asking a girl out and proudly sporting a so-called moustache at age 12 also had the audience in stitches. And as the only female in the show, Kayla Anderson did a beautiful job of portraying the various roles women play in a man’s life, including those of wife, mother, friend and lover.

But not every experience ends on a jovial note. While Calhoun serenades us about how he never thought of being a man “until you told me so,” King and Green execute a series of push-and-pull partnering exchanges featuring concaved torso movements, high chest arcs and body dips. Green’s journey to manhood involves joining the army, and he didn’t miss the irony of being a gay soldier in the “don’t ask don’t tell” days who would ultimately win the manly solider of the year award. The other performers’ subtle marching steps and pivot turns are done in contingent and round out Green’s tale. King speaks about how he felt like a man after his first physical argument with his father, depicted visually by two performers in the background.

Every artist strives to influence a person’s perception pertaining to a certain topic or theme, but sometimes they miss the mark. Still, DGDG succeeds in altering the audiences’ perception of what society deems to be manly behavior by reminding us, through Pendergrass’ monologue near the end, that we are all human and therefore should be allowed to express all the emotions that come with that privilege freely and without judgment.

This review was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: Danielle Georgiou Dance Group’s NICE

Photo: Trenton Ryan Stephenson
Photo: Trenton Ryan Stephenson

Danielle Georgiou Dance Group prepares for the premiere of its new evening-length dance-theatre work, NICE, at the Wyly Theatre as part of the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Elevator Project.

Dallas — “I bet you thrift shop real well,” one dancer says as he walks past me in the small, intimate space on the sixth floor of the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre in the Dallas Arts District Tuesday evening. Before I can react another dancer passes by pausing to look me up and down before stating, “Wow, you look so comfy in those clothes.” The performers’ overly sweet demeanor paired with Paul Slavens’ reminder to be nice in his Mr. Rogers voice takes the sting out of the back-handed compliment I just received, making me laugh instead.

Danielle Georgiou then has the group stop and run through the section again while the tech crew adjusts lighting cues, music volumes and mike stand placement. The 11 dancers that make upDanielle Georgiou Dance Group (DGDG) stand patiently on the outskirts of four ceiling-to-floor panels of white paper that add some dimension to the otherwise sparse room. This time around the dancers walking past comment on my striped top and an invisible audience member’s shoes. Meanwhile, Georgiou and her crew, including musician Slavens, conceptual artist Justin Locklear, set and lighting designer Lori Honeycutt, stage manager Liz Metelsky and light board operator Kayla Anderson quickly address any issues and give the Okay for the dancers to move on.

Georgiou’s new work NICE, running Nov. 13-23 as part of the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s new Elevator Project, toes the line on what individuals and society consider to be nice behavior through the use of etiquette verbiage, poignant movement choices and audience participation. (Read more about the Elevator Project in our story here.)

The work is divided into various situations (i.e. the wild girl scene, mob scene and debutante ball) depicting what society deems nice behavior with respect to women. Georgiou cleverly blends traditions and stereotypes such as coming out parties and 1950s’ housewives etiquette with today’s more loose manners to produce an effect that is both disturbing and amusing. In between these sections the performers take turns reading from an etiquette book or reciting lines while executing purpose-driven movement reflecting their words. This includes jerky gestures and sequential whole body movement that parallels the ebb and flow of the speaker’s voice.  For example, one performer chooses to sing his lines while another recites his in a British accent.

Georgiou, who writes a monthly column for TheaterJones, also uses traditional dances like the waltz and polka to depict a time when women were cherished and protected. The four couples glide around the space with ease and end in tender embraces. The other side of this coin is addressed when two female dancers enter in their bras and underwear and begin flinging their bodies onto the ground and frantically try to escape the arms of their male keepers to no avail. The darker scenes involve the men whistling and catcalling at the ladies and the women yelling at the men to pay to attention to them. Georgiou’s movement choices in these parts are pretty risqué, but have been crafted to serve a purpose and therefore come across more edgy. The men roving their hands down the whole length of their female counterpart, basically demeaning the female body, would have lost some of its meaning if done in overabundance. What makes Georgiou’s work so collective is her ability to edit herself and therefore push her audience to its limits without turning them away.

This preview was originally published on TheaterJones.com.

Q&A: Choreographer Danielle Georgiou, DGDG

Photo: Emily Loving
Photo: Emily Loving

Choreographer Danielle Georgiou discusses the concept behind her company’s latest production, Dirty Filthy Diamonds, plus her experiences with crowdfunding and the state of the local dance community.

Dallas — Danielle Georgiou Dance Group (DGDG) may be one of youngest dance groups in Dallas, but they have certainly been grabbing the community’s attention with memorable showings at last year’s Aurora and this year’s Atopia. DGDG is hoping to keep that momentum going with its latest production, Dirty Filthy Diamonds, at the Margo Jones Theatre in Fair Park, running Feb. 26-March 8.

Danielle Georgiou formed the DGDG in 2011 and describes it as a performance art dance group that works within the ideas of German expressionism and Tanztheater. Georgiou truly has a hand in every part of the dance community in North Texas. She is the Program Coordinator and Visiting Scholar in Dance at Eastfield College, the Director of University of Texas at Arlington’s Dance Ensemble, a guest choreographer for Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet, a performer with Contemporary Ballet Dallas and a local dance writer/critic who writes a monthly column,Sixth Position, for TheaterJones.

Dirty Filthy Diamonds was created by Georgiou in collaboration with Justin Locklear (script and set design), Jermy Elizabeth Johnson (composer), Hillary Holsonback (video, makeup and costume designer), Emily Loving (graphic design and set design) and the DGDG dancers.

TheaterJones asks Georgiou about the inspiration for Dirty Filthy Diamonds, her experience using Kickstarter to generate funds and the challenges facing the Dallas dance community today.

TheaterJones: You wear so many hats: dancer, teacher, choreographer, performance artist, dance writer. How do you manage to balance it all?

Danielle Georgiou: Well, I don’t sleep a lot and I drink a lot of coffee. But really I just love what I do and it’s all connected in a strange yet logically way. And I think the fact that I can connect my teaching to my writing and then to the performance part of it, it just makes everything simple in a way. There are days when I am just done with everything, but the next morning everything is all right and I just get back to work. I mean if I wasn’t doing this for a living I would be completely miserable.

Did you start out as a dancer turned choreographer or vice versa?

It started out with performance, but I was also interested in behind the scenes work like stage managing and lights and just the whole process of being in a performance. Then in college I was given the chance to choreograph and I just feel in love with telling stories and now I can’t get it out of my system.

I have always been interested in creative writing. In college I got into business writing which I didn’t really like so, I took a public policy class and got really interested in writing about education and the arts. In graduate school when I was writing my thesis about arts education and arts funding in Texas it got noticed by Anne Bothwell and Charles Santos and they gave me a chance. My first writing opportunity was with Art&Seek, a service of KERA.

Photo: Courtesy of DGDG
DGDG Artistic Director Danielle Georgiou. Photo: Karlo X. Ramos

You are very in touch with the local dance community. What would you say is the biggest challenge facing the community today?

I think its two-fold. I think the first part is funding. It’s how the smaller companies are going to raise money when there are larger companies with longer histories also vying for funds. When you are new, and by new I mean 10 years or younger, it’s hard to maintain that audience base as well as the donation and funder bases. So, I think it’s very important for the smaller companies to start thinking creativity about how to put on a show. It doesn’t have to be in the biggest theater. It doesn’t have to be in a theater at all. I think a lot of the most interesting work is coming from people and/or companies that are seeking out alternative spaces.

And the other part is the competition aspect of the dance community and it’s not just in Dallas, but a national occurrence. Dance is about community. Fundamentality that’s how we used to communicate because we didn’t have a written language so, we’d communicate through our bodies and through movement. And I think that idea has gotten lost along the way. That we are really a family and that we are all speaking the same language. And if we are going to survive then we need to support one another and not fight against each other. And these challenges really go hand in hand because we are all fighting for the same money and audience. So, instead of pitting ourselves against one another I really think we need to have that camaraderie and that family spirit.

I know you used Kickstarter to help raise funds for Dirty Filthy Diamonds. What was the process like?

For me, it was just learning the process and doing it all. It’s very simple and they pretty much lay it out for you. I think my biggest challenge was just overcoming my nervousness about it. I have never asked for money before so, I was putting myself out there in this very vulnerable way. In the end I was so humbled by the amount of support we received from the Kickstarter community and people here in Dallas. I had a really positive experience with Kickstarter and with using a crowdfunding platform and I would definitely recommend it for other people.

Did you encounter any challenges during the collaboration process with Locklear, Johnson, Holsonback and Loving?

It’s been pretty smooth. We’ve all worked together in some capacity or another on other things. It helps that we all have the same way of thinking. We approach concepts differently, but ultimately we aesthetically view things in a similar manner. But it is also challenging. We are all really strong willed people and we have to work together to make everyone is happy and to make the work make sense. We also have to constantly remind ourselves that it’s not personal. I am just really lucky that I’m able to work with people who are like my family.

What is performance art?

I would describe performance art, in the dance sense, as taking a dance company out of the theater and then flipping the table and putting it back in. So, we are in a theater space, but it’s not a theater anymore. We’ve created an installation. We’ve created an environment. So, it’s not a traditional set and it’s not staged. You walk in and you become part of the show. Performance art is a happening. We’re living our lives in this place that we’ve created for you to come in and live with us. That is what Dirty Filthy Diamonds is about.

How did you come up with the idea for Dirty Filthy Diamonds?

My boyfriend Justin and I were talking about these vignettes that he was sketching out one day and I said it would be really great to tell that through movement instead of a traditional script and he agreed. Justin is an avant garde performer and works a lot with puppets and clowning so, movement comes naturally to him as well. And we thought this would be a great way to continue working together and really push both of ourselves because he has never worked on a dance project and I have worked on theatrical performances before, but have never streamed a performance together or written an original script. Then we just started developing the script based on the idea of growing up in America and then coming of age and dealing with sexuality and gender. And also that competitive aspect of becoming an adult and how we are basically still who we were in high school, but just with larger bank accounts and rules and responsibilities. The show really deals with the themes and concepts of being young in America and in a culture that is dealing a lot with social media, distraction and sex. Those are the things we are confronted with every day.

In the promotional photos the dancers are wearing similar black wigs and blue tops with blue lipstick. What is the idea behind this?

One of the main aspects of the show is finding individuality. How we fight constantly to present ourselves as individuals while we end up eventually conforming. This is something that just naturally happens. It’s just the social order of life and that’s the idea behind the wigs and identical looks of everybody. And throughout the show everyone’s constantly struggling with it and trying something else on so they eventually end up looking one certain way. This causes something to happen, but you will have to go see Dirty Filthy Diamonds to find out what.

This Q&A was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.