Tag Archives: Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre

Southern Hospitality: Preview of Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s 2018 Cultural Awareness Series


Michelle N. Gibson. Photo: Omar Ramos

Choreographer and Hurricane Katrina survivor Michelle N. Gibson shares her story in Displaced, Yet Rebirthed, part of Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Cultural Awareness Series.

Dallas — In August 2005, Michelle N. Gibson and her family, including her newborn son, piled into their car and drove away from their New Orleans home. A home they would never return to due to the flooding and destruction left in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. With very few supplies and no means to contact family and friends, Gibson and her family drove all the way to Dallas where her boyfriend at the time had recently resided. It was in a hotel lobby where Gibson got her first look at the devastation caused by Katrina. “We had no idea what was going on because we didn’t even have electricity in the hotels so, we didn’t know about the conditions of the convention center or the whereabouts of our family and friends. Let me tell you! When I watched the TV for the first time and saw the people in front of the convention center looking like it was a third world country, I just lost it. I have never felt so helpless.”

That first year after relocating was a tough one for Gibson, who knew nobody in the area. She chose to stay home with her young children instead of finding a job as a dance educator. She says at the time she didn’t even want to dance. All that changed the day Vicki Meek called her out of the blue and told her to get down to the South Dallas Cultural Center. “Now, if you know Mama Vicki then you know when she speaks you better listen. She said she heard that I had been in Dallas for a year and she had not laid eyes on me so I needed to make my way down to the South Dallas Cultural Center.”

DBDT rehearsing Displaced, Yet Rebirthed.  Photo: Melissa Young

Gibson soon found herself at the South Dallas Cultural Center where she met Meek who, to this day, has been a source of comfort and support for Gibson. “The South Dallas Cultural Center was the space that gave me a new start. It gave me a new place to create and a new home and I am forever grateful to Vicki and the center.” She adds, “Vicki also enabled me to pick back up with Exhibit Dance Collective, a dance company I started in New Orleans which is kind of like the Urban Bush Women of the south in that the work was all about the feminist empowerment movement and women of color.”

Today, in addition to running Exhibit Dance Collective, Gibson also teaches dance at Brookhaven College and Mountain View College in Dallas. She also holds an artist in residence position with the Ashe’ Cultural Arts Center in New Orleans. Over the last 12 years Gibson has also taught dance for the Dallas Independent School District and has conducted numerous dance intensives and workshops for universities and cultural centers across the U.S. and in Germany. Gibson earned a B.F.A in dance from Tulane University and her M.F.A in dance and performance studies from Hollins University/American Dance Festival at Duke University.

Gibson’s choreographic works include New Orleans Second Line: Takin It To The Roots performed at the American Dance Festival in 2001; Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters with the Dallas Children’s Theater; Krump accompanied by the LoneStar Wind Orchestra at the Meyerson Center; 2008 South Dallas Dance Festival premiere of I Made It, But Some Didn’t, a tribute to souls survivors of Hurricane Katrina; and the Dallas premiere of Evolution: Honoring, Recognizing, and Uplifting Women of Color and Sisters of the Yam at the South Dallas Cultural Center in 2012.

This weekend Gibson will be sharing her Katrina evacuation story using some traditional New Orleans dance moves and music in Displaced, Yet Rebirthed, which is part of Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s (DBDT) Cultural Awareness Series at the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre. It was recently announced that the dancers will be accompanied by The Kickin’ Brass Band and New Orleans trumpeter Thaddeus Ford in the grand finale. The program also includes Christopher L. Huggins’ tribute to South African President Nelson Mandela in His Grace.

After receiving the call from former DBDT Artistic Director Bridget L. Moore asking if she would be a part of the performance, Gibson spent a week with the company exploring her movement aesthetic which she calls a fusion of jazz, contemporary, Afro modern and New Orleans second line, a style Gibson says she has been cultivating since graduate school.

“Second line is not something you learn in a dance studio. For me, second line is kind of the traditional dance of New Orleans so for my thesis I began to look at a dance that’s done from an impulse and then started creating a language so the movement could be taught.” She continues, “In my classes I will usually have a live brass band there because the music cannot be separated from the movement. Like when you go church and the spirit hits you it’s like a buildup of adrenaline that needs to release. So, that’s what I try to maintain in my second line aesthetic.”

Gibson created Displaced, Yet Rebirthed during her residency at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign last year and says the process was like a therapy session with herself. “It has taken a while for me to creatively through dance do a work about Katrina because I’m still wearing it. We ALL are still wearing it. And this piece is about what we are still living through every single day.”

When it was time to go into the studio with DBDT Gibson says she knew the dancers were technically good, but that this work was not just about the movement. “It’s about the dancers being able to embody a real life experience such as the loss we all felt after Katrina. Because Katrina was a loss for us all emotionally, mentality and spiritually. So, I went in thinking of the work as a compositional piece and focused on getting the dancers to understand how to allow the human experience to be the movement and not the movement being the movement.”

Gibson also points out that there is a fine line between being authentic and acting when creating a piece on such an emotional topic like Katrina, and so to keep the piece from becoming overly dramatic she would sit down with the dancers before every rehearsal to just talk. “You see, I always wanted them to know where I was in my spirit as a human being and not just as a choreographer and talk about my intentions for the work. We would talk about different parts of Katrina and how it happened for me so then they could take my experience and make it their experience.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.



Fresh Perspectives: Preview of Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Director’s Choice

Booker T. Alum Rebecca Troyak makes her choreographic debut at Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Director’s Choice performance this weekend.

Rebecca Troyak. Photo: Courtesy of Troyak

Dallas — Walking into Bridget L. Moore’s composition class freshman year at Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts (BTWHSPVA), Rebecca Troyak was immediately drawn to the worldly choreographer’s energy and teaching methods.

“She has such a power about her and she is just a beautiful person inside and out,” Troyak says about her dance mentor. “She is so thoughtful about her work and is so willing to bring something new out of you. I didn’t know I had the ability to choreography until she brought it out of me. She also has had an amazing career and it is refreshing that someone so talented is willing to be so opened about her experiences and share her knowledge.”

Moore shares with TheaterJones that her first choreographer opportunity occurred in college at The Ohio State University with the late Jeraldyne Blunden, founder of Dayton Contemporary Dance Company. “Jeraldyne saw something special in me and invited me to workshop choreography on the dancers in the company,” Moore says. “That was a rare and unique opportunity and was the catalyst for honing my craft as a choreographer. I also had wonderful teachers who continued to push me as an artist even after I had long graduated. These same teachers are now my friends and colleagues and continue to support me and the work that I do. I now offer the same support that was given to me as a young aspiring artist and choreographer.”

Moore’s passion for nurturing the next generation of dancers and performers is just one of the many refreshing characteristics she brings into her role as the new artistic director of Dallas Black Dance Theatre (DBDT), which is evident in the lineup for her first Director’s Choice performance Nov. 3-5 at the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre in Dallas. Along with an expanded version of Moore’s Uncharted Territory, the program also features Andy Noble’s Tower and a duet by newcomer Troyak.

Moore in rehearsal with DBDT. Photo: Xavier Mack

“Bridget has this kind of mindset where she wants to nurture young artists, which is so wonderful and I am so grateful that she wants to help nurture me still at this time in my life,” Troyak says. “I mean it is definitely scary walking into a room knowing that I am younger than most of the dancers, but everyone at DBDT was so responsive and supportive that it made the process really easy.”

“I have always been impressed with Rebecca,” Moore says about her decision to have Troyak work with the company. “But I was extremely pleased to see her sensibility and approach to working in a professional setting with DBDT. The dancers were very receptive to her process, and she being a college student had no bearing on her artistic integrity, information shared with the dancers or the professionalism she brought to DBDT.”

“Rebecca is exceptionally gifted, both as a performer and choreographer, and is a young artist with considerable promise. There is a level of maturity and sophistication about her work and that is essentially the reason why Monophonic was selected to be a part of Director’s Choice.” (See a video of a previous performance of Monophonic above.)

Originally from Ontario, Canada, Troyak and her family moved to Dallas when she was 12. She attended BTWHSPVA where she was a member of the Repertory Dance Ensemble I. During her four years there she had the opportunity to work with various renowned choreographers, including Jessica Lang, Dwight Rhoden, Sidra Bell, Lar Lubovich, Takehiro Ueyama, Clifford Williams, Troy Powell, Adam Houghland and Andy Noble. Troyak has also trained at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Batsheva Dance Company, San Francisco Conservatory of Dance, Complexions Contemporary Ballet and the Joffrey Ballet School. Troyak is currently a junior at the University of Southern California’s Glorya Kaufman School of Dance under the direction of Jodie Gates and William Forsythe.

Troyak will be presenting her work Monophonic, which is a duet she created alongside her best friend during her senior year at BTWHSPVA. The piece explores the couple’s unique relationship using a blend of contemporary and modern movement devices. “I say we are an unlikely duo because we are complete opposites. He is super outgoing and I am on the shy side, but what makes are relationship work is that he has given me so many qualities of him and vice versa and we have become better people because of each other.” She adds, “The piece is really just about exploring the give and take of relationships and human interaction and connection in general, and what we have to offer one another.”

Troyak points out that name of the piece, Monophonic, is a musical term meaning one sound. She says the dancers demonstrate this idea by staying separated in the beginning, but as the work evolves they come together to be one person or one sound. “So, they are not individuals by the end. There are two people who have given and taken so much of each other that they are in harmony with one another.”

The music Troyak selected is a dramatic opera piece that she says fits her choreographic personality. “I am an emotionally driven person so, I like music that is emotionally charged and that is what I found in this opera piece.” She adds, “When I am dancing I like to feel the music. I don’t want to just do shapes in the space. I want to feel every moment that I am making in space and feel the intention and purpose of what I am doing and I think music is so powerful and it definitely drives my movement a lot of times.”

After teaching a company class and watching the dancers improv for a bit, Troyak chose DBDT company members Claude Alexander III and Jasmine White-Killins to perform her piece with Zion Pradier and Hana Delong acting as their understudies. Known for his dynamic stage presence, lyrical athleticism and effortless partnering, it’s no surprise why Troyak chose to work with Alexander. What is surprising is that Alexander will be dancing with White-Killins after being paired up with Alyssa Harrington for multiple seasons. (Harrington moved on from DBDT at the end of last season.) “Because I didn’t really know the dancers going into this process I relied on my instincts when it came to matching up the couples. I just kept switching them around and I just kept going back to Claude and Jasmine.” When asked what drew her to these two dancers Troyak says, “During company class Claude caught my eye right away. He has something really unique to offer, which this piece definitely requires. And what is awesome too is that Claude and Jasmine are actually really good friends and so they could really connect to the work.”

Troyak also says this experience has taught her a lot about herself, including how to take ownership of the room and how to share her knowledge in terms that the dancers could easily understand. “It was a different task for me and I am thankful to Bridget for allowing me to have complete control from beginning to end. Troyak adds, “What has surprised me the most about myself during this process is my ability to take ownership and lead the space. Because I’ve been so used to the other role where I listen and don’t talk, I surprised myself by being able to take charge and go up to the front of the room and say exactly what I wanted. And what was really amazing for me was watching the dancers’ change how they were moving to fit the demands of the dance.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.



Preview: Interpretations, Dallas Black Dance Theatre

Sean J. Smith. Photo: DBDT

Dallas Black Dance Theatre celebrates 40 years through video clips, audio recordings and dance in Sean J. Smith’s Interpretations, part of DBDT’s Cultural Awareness Series.

Dallas — “This is just magical! I had never been in a theater before…!” As Ms. Ann Williams reflects in a pre-recorded interview about her first visit to the opera and seeing dance for the first time, Dallas Black Dance Theatre (DBDT) Company Member Claude Alexander III leisurely makes his way to the center of the large rehearsal space, which occupies most of the second floor of DBDT’s home on Ann Williams Way in downtown Dallas. As Ms. Williams’ voice fades, it is replaced with the bright and powerful sounds of Louis Armstrong’s trumpet in Birth of the Blues, which Alexander emulates through his explosive jumps, smooth leg circles and cutting arm movements.

A dance hall vibe ensues as the rest of DBDT’s main company enters and exits from different parts of the stage sometimes singularly and other times in pairs or trios while performing a lush variety of jazz, ballet and contemporary moves in the first section of DBDT’s Company Member Sean J. Smith’s newest work, Interpretations. The approximately 30-minute work tells the story of the company’s 40-year legacy using dance, video clips and audio recordings that feature DBDT alums and faculty members, including Deena Chavoya-Ellis, Darrell Cleveland, Nycole Ray, Kathleen Sanders, DeMarcus Williams and Melissa M. Young, just to name a few. The piece also features music by Smooth Jazz All Stars, Les Miserables Brass Band, Ella Fitzgerald, Sammy Davis, Jr., Sarah Vaughan and Chris Botti.

In addition to acting as the thread tying all seven dance sections together, the audio recordings also serve as a reference point for each dance break. For example, prior to the second section Ms. Williams talks about the company’s early days and its founding members. As the audio is playing Hana Delong, Kayah Franklin, Alyssa Harrington, Jasmine White-Killins and McKinley Willis enter with a black folding chair. The dancers proceed to lean, stand and droop across the chairs, and as the ladies move circularly from chair to chair you get this feeling of time passing which is intensified when the men join in. The choreography in this section flows seamlessly from slow and methodical to fast and daring with a couple Fosse-inspired moves thrown in for some added zing, including head bobs, shoulder shimmies with elbows close to the body and walks with tilted hips.

“I use a multitude of styles, not just one,” Smith says about his movement choices for Interpretations. I have a couple sections that are jazz orientated, but also contemporary. I also incorporate some fast foot work and some adagio movement that celebrates DBDT’s diversity, which I don’t think I could’ve done by sticking to just one style.”

Smith has a diverse dancing background that includes jazz, tap, ballet, modern and contemporary techniques. His dance idols include Gregory Hines, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Michael Jackson. He has trained at many well-known dance institutions such as Toronto Dance Theatre, Ballet Creole and The Ailey School before joining DBDT in 2010. Over the last six years Smith has performed featured roles in works by Alvin Ailey, Donald McKayle and Jamal Story. As a choreographer he has produced 11 works for the last seven Black on Black performances and created his first full-length piece entitled Monologues for the company in 2013.

When Ms. Williams approached Smith about making a piece showcasing the evolution of DBDT for its 40th anniversary season Smith says he was honored to work on a project of this magnitude. “I am appreciative to Ms. Williams for giving me this opportunity. Anyone can go to the website and read our history, so the challenge is how do I make this material more engaging and interesting. To me we are not Dallas Black Dance Museum. We are Dallas Black Dance Theatre and so it is important to make this a special experience as you get all this wonderful information from the last 40 years.”

DBDT will also perform …And Now Marvin this weekend. Photo: Enrica Tseng

When asked about the meaning behind the title Interpretations, Smith says it speaks to the true nature of being a member of a repertory dance company. “Interpretations is an important title because that is what we do as dancers; we interpret. We have a 40-year history of diverse and challenging repertory that spans many different genres and we as dancers have the responsibility to maintain the integrity of the work. So, the idea is when you step on stage the steps are the same, but the person conveying the message will always change as every body and spirit carries with it a different set of experiences that they will convey through the choreography.”

As the piece comes to a conclusion in a rip roaring big band number featuring the men performing a series of leaps, turns and slides while holding on to canes that they periodically extend out as if passing the baton to the next generation of DBDT dancers, a female voice suddenly cuts through the noise. She says something along the lines of “This is what I have been waiting for! I am in awe of the company now!” The finale, which features the entire company dancing in unison for the first time throughout the whole work, gives us a glimpse into DBDT’s future and will hopefully leave you feeling uplifted and inspired.

The premiere of Interpretations was made possible in part by an award from the MidAmerica Arts Alliance. You can experience the work for yourself during Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Cultural Awareness Series, Feb. 17-19, at the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre in the Dallas Arts District. The program also includes an excerpt of Bruce Wood’s Smoke (2001), Asadata Dafora’s Awassa Astrige/Ostrich (1934), Darryl Sneed’s …And Now Marvin (1995), and Wood’s solo The Edge of My Life…So Far (2010) performed by DBDT: Encore! Artistic Director Nycole Ray.

In other DBDT news, next week in Austin the company will receive a Texas Medal of the Arts award in Arts Education.

<<This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.



Q&A: Tapper Anthony Morigerato

The Man with the fast feet on the resurgence of tap dance in America, choreographing for So You Think You Can Dance and participating in the third annual Rhythm in Fusion Festival this weekend. 

Anthony Morigerato. Photo: Shiloh Creek Photography

This weekend approximately 200 tappers from more than 20 states as well as Canada and Mexico will converge at the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre in the Dallas Arts District for the third annual Rhythm in Fusion Festival (RIFF). The event, which is produced by local tap instructor Malana Murphy and runs Jan. 13-16, offers attendees a slew of training, networking and performing opportunities all in one inspiring setting. Tappers will have the opportunity to participate in numerous master classes focused on technique, tap history and music theory in addition to a cutting contest, tap jam, solo showcase and the popular RIFF faculty concert, this year called TAPN2Tap, which for the first time will also feature youth groups from across the nation, including Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, New Jersey and Washington D.C.

RIFF’s 2017 faculty roster is its largest to date with 20 guest artists from across the U.S. and even abroad, including Canada, Cuba and Brazil. The line-up includes Chloe Arnold (Syncopated Ladies), Anthony Morigerato (Emmy nominated choreographer, Season 12 So You Think You Can Dance), Max Pollak (originator of RumbaTap), Derick Grant (original company member of Bring In ‘Da Noise, Bring In ‘Da Funk) and Dianne “Lady Di” Walker (artistic advisor to the Tap Program at Jacob’s Pillow), just to name a few.

One of the returning faces this year is New York City-based Choreographer Anthony Morigerato. Morigerato trained at Marymount Manhattan College where he performed modern and ballet works by Robert Battle, Elizabeth Higgins, Jiri Kylian, Katie Langan, David Parsons and William Soleu. As a performer he has been a soloist and member of Michael Minery’s Tapaholics and is the lead tap dancer and choreographer for the musical group Matt and Anthony. Morigerato has also performed on stages all over the world and on T.V. shows, including the Tony Danza Show and NBC’s America’s Got Talent. He is also the executive director and choreographer for AM Productions.

His popularity has skyrocketed over the last two years thanks to his guest choreographer spots on So You Think You Dance, one of which earned him an Emmy nod in 2016. (Watch the video here.) He has also served as an adjudicator and master teacher for dance organizations, competitions, theater schools and dance studios throughout the nation since 1999. Today, Morigerato continues to travel the nation performing, teaching and choreographing.

TheaterJones.com connected with Anthony Morigerato last week to discuss his distinctive tap style, the changing job market, choreographing for SYTYCD and participating in RIFF.

Anthony Morigerato. Photo: Operation Tap

TheaterJones: How would you describe your tap style?

Anthony Morigerato: I don’t know that I am an objective enough source to speak about my own tap style. How I perceive what I do is probably very different from how an audience member perceives my work. What I can say is that I am super inspired by tap dancers and artists generally of all kind. As a small child I grew up watching Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, The Nicholas Brothers, Eleanor Powell, Ginger Rogers and such. As I got older I began to appreciate the hoofers and rhythm tap dancers of the subsequent generations, including The Condos Brothers, Jimmy Slyde, Baby Laurence, Sammy Davis Jr., Gregory Hines and Savion Glover. I am also a trained dancer in modern dance, ballet and jazz. So my style, if you will, is a collection of these influences, intentioned in various moments by a multitude/variety of artistic forces.

What role does your formal dance training play in your choreography?

I went to school at Marymount Manhattan College and studied composition [choreography]. Aside from formal dance training, I have also had formal compositional training. Being a tap dancer this was huge for me as a large part of our form is rooted in an improvisational tradition. As a performer I improvise. As a choreographer you are employing different skills so it was important for me to learn and develop on those skills.

What do you like students to take away from your classes?

I like for students to take away from my classes how much I love tap dance and how much I want to see them succeed in the form. I also want the students to feel challenged physically, technically, musically and spiritually in my classes. I want them leaving with at least one thing that stumped them that they have to go home and work on and possibly some advice that they will employ throughout their lives as artists.

How did you get involved with So You Think You Can Dance? How has that experience impacted your career?

I got involved with SYTYCD as a consequence of the saying, “being in the right place at the right time.” I performed as a guest in a show in LA that the producers of SYTYCD attended. It just so happened that a month later they had decided to make a concerted effort to bring tap dance to this format for the first time and they said, “hey let’s call that guy who we just saw perform last month.” A stroke of good fortune and timing.

Choreographing for SYTYCD has been a great opportunity for me to show tap dance in a mass media setting and exposing audience members to the form who would have other wise not had the opportunity maybe to see tap dance. The format is challenging and difficult to make tap read well in and I welcome the challenge and approach the opportunity with great relish.

What do you get out of participating in tap festivals such as RIFF?

I get the opportunity to work with aspiring tap dancers and shape their perceptions of the form. That in and of itself is thrilling and important work. Education and passion for a life’s work are tenants as a human being I believe in deeply. RIFF gives me the opportunity to express myself in action in both of these tenants.

You also taught at last year’s RIFF event. What do you think of the talent here in Dallas? What advice do you have for tappers looking to break into television and film? 

I think that Dallas and many areas of Texas and many areas of the country for that matter have some of the brightest prospects and serious talent our form has right now. Great teachers in this area coupled with interest from the students in the form has made for tap dance to feel truly energized. RIFF is a microcosm in this area of a phenomenon that is going on in tap dance all over the world. That is really cool!

For young dancers I would say to them work on your technique, work on your form, work on your musicality and have a point of view as an artist. If you are looking only to be famous or be on T.V. chances are you will never even receive the opportunity to do so. Focus on being an amazing artist, a humble human being who people enjoy being around and have a tremendous work ethic. If you excel in these areas the opportunities you seek will begin to present themselves. Also remember the road is not linear, it twists, detours, splits and is long. Let the road take you to unexpected places, you will find new opportunities and new people that will change your life as an artist and as a person truly for your betterment. Use every opportunity to grow and you will be a satisfied person and artist!

How has the job market for tappers in particular changed since you started out? Is there more variety?

I think that tap is making a comeback in Broadway shows, on TV and in other performance environments such as Vegas and others. However, I would say that tap dancers have to develop skills in many areas as producers, teachers, writers, film makers, etc. Creating your own opportunities and vehicles to work is a huge part of this business.

Where would you like to see the art form go in the next five years?

I don’t like attempting predicting the future, but I would like to see an environment in which tap dance has equal funding, institutional support, media coverage and opportunities that all other dance forms enjoy. My life’s work is in attempting to make this a reality for subsequent generations of tap dancers.

>> You can check out the full schedule for RIFF 2017 at http://www.rhythminfusion.com

>> This Q&A was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.