Tag Archives: Downtown Dallas

Springing Forward: Dallas Black Dance Theatre Spring Celebration Series 2017

Stephen Mills’ One. Photo: Tony Spielberg
 Dallas Black Dance Theatre leaps into a new era with Stephen Mills’ Bounce and two works by new Artistic Director Briget L. Moore at its annual Spring Celebration Series.

Dallas — A rollercoaster of emotions, movement that changes in texture, weight and dimension, and jumps – lots of them. With its strong classical foundation and pas de deux like couplings, Ballet Austin Artistic Director Stephen Mills’ Bounce is a detour from what we normally see from Dallas Black Dance Theatre (DBDT). Well known for presenting works that honor the African American culture and related dance styles, it’s easy to forget that DBDT is also well-versed in modern, jazz and classical dance forms. The dancers prove this in Bounce, which will be performed alongside works by Twyla Tharp and DBDT’s new Artistic Director Bridget L. Moore at the company’s annual Spring Celebration Series, May 19-21, at the Charles and Dee Wyly Theatre in the Arts District.

In Bounce, the dancers’ strong classical training can be seen in their port de bras, controlled arabesques and jumps with deep plies, which Mills cleverly fused with grounded foot work, curvaceous spine movements and elastic body positions for a more contemporary look. And with no plotline or hidden messages to decipher the audience can just sit back and enjoy the way the dancers’ bodies interpret the music, which is an original score by Austin-based composer Graham Reynolds. Reynolds’ work has been featured in numerous movie soundtracks, including Before Midnight, Bernie and A Scanner Darkly and he is one of Mills’ favorite collaborators for original dance music.

Bridget L. Moore’s Uncharted Territory. Photo: Xavier Mack

Mills has always had a penchant for all things musical. Growing up in a small town in Kentucky, Mills’ extracurricular activities included piano lessons and drama club. It wasn’t until his first year of college when one of his theater requirements included him taking a ballet class that he discovered his passion for the art form. From there he jumped into every class he could find, including ballet, modern, jazz, tap and even African dance at the Ailey School. He would later join The Harkness Ballet and The American Dance Machine in New York before moving on to work with Ohard Naharin, Katherine Posin and Mark Dendy.

Since becoming artistic director of Ballet Austin in 2000, Mills has created a number of innovative and memorable works for the company, including Hamlet, The Taming of the Shrew and Light/The Holocaust & Humanity Project, his two-year, community-wide human rights collaboration. Most recently, Mills was awarded the Steinberg Award, the top honor at Le Festival des Arts de Saint-Sauveur International Choreographic Competition for One/the body’s grace.

Mills’ sophisticated understanding of music can be seen throughout Bounce from the opening sequence where the dancers bounce side-to-side to the syncopated beats of a xylophone; to his visually compelling use of movement canons and moments of stillness in the quartet with Claude Alexander, III, Zion Pradier, Sean J. Smith and De’ Anthony Vaughan accompanied by the harmonious tinkering of a piano. While I didn’t get to see Mills at the rehearsal of Bounce I attended last week at DBDT’s main studio in downtown Dallas I did get to see international choreographer and Dallas native Bridget L. Moore in the studio – an opportunity I have been looking forward to since it was announced she would be taking over as artistic director earlier this year.

I was eager to see how she would interact with the dancers now that she has become a permanent fixture in the organization. She has worked with the company on many different occasions, but it has always been in a visiting artist capacity. While I wasn’t surprised with her straight-forward, hands-on approach during notes, I was inspired by her thoughtful individual critiques, which were focused on helping the dancers continue to growth artistically for the long haul and not just in the moment.

A prime example was her feedback for Alyssa Harrington regarding one of her duet sections with Alexander. “You have such beautiful lines, but there’s still more you can do to bring us in,” Moore says. “Push to elongate more and reach behind that knee. Don’t just rely on the lines you have.” The movement phrase Moore was referring to is when Harrington developes her right leg up as she leans into Alexander before she springs back onto that leg in an arabesque hold with her arms reaching forward. Harrington’s mind/body connection was much stronger after hearing Moore’s comments. She was able to stretch through her movement more, which did indeed draw my eye in.

One of the things Moore wanted the group as a whole to continue working on is their performance quality. Because the work keeps bouncing back and forth between various emotions and moods such as anger, longing, flirtation and joy, it’s imperative that the dancers remain in the zone if they want the piece to keep the audience engaged from start to finish. “You have to continue building your performance quality while also executing the movement at the same time. You need to figure out how to connect more with the movement and your partner so the piece reads well.”

You can find out how well the piece reads at Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Spring Celebration Series, May 19-21, at the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre in the Dallas Arts District. In addition to Stephen Mills’ Bounce, the program also includes Bridget L. Moore’s Southern Recollection: For Romare Bearden and Uncharted Territory as well as Twyla Tharp’s 1983 Sinatra Suite© and a special guest performance by Ballet Austin, performing Mills’ One.

<< This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

 

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Dallas DanceFest Profile: Indique Dance Company

Indique Dance Company. Photo: Courtesy
Indique Dance Company. Photo: Courtesy

Indique Dance Company co-founder Sarita Venkatraman talks about the city’s growing Indian dance community and partaking in the reinvigorated Dallas DanceFest this weekend.

Dallas — From far away the Dallas dancescape appears to consist mostly of ballet and modern dance companies, but if you look closer there are also several cultural dance groups pushing their way to the forefront, including classical Indian dance group Indique Dance Company. Formed in 2008 by Sarita Venkatraman, Shalini Varghese, Latha Shrivasta, Anu Sury, Kruti Patel, Bhuvana Venkatraman and Shilpi Mehta, Indique Dance Company fuses Indian classical, folk and modern dance styles with contemporary themes to create an enjoyable and enlightening cultural experience.

And through its collaboration with the Indian Cultural Heritage Foundation (ICHF), the company has had the chance to perform in some of the most popular venues in the Dallas Arts Districts, including Klyde Warren Park, the Crow Collection of Asian Art and Dallas City Performance Hall. “We are so thankful for all the opportunities Dallas has provided for Indique,” Venkatraman says. “Over the last six years we have been welcomed by both Indian and non-Indian audiences which has just been incredible.”

For Venkatraman dance has always been a calling. “Growing up in India my Dad was really into Indian classical music so I was exposed to the arts at a very young age. I joined a dance school in Mumbai at the age of 10 and have been dancing ever since.” Under the tutelage of Guru Shri Mani, Venkatraman began her Bharatanatyam dance training and after a couple of years moved on to learn Kathak from Smt. Guru Asha Joglekar. “In Sanskrit, guru means teacher and becoming a teacher is more of a calling than a profession. A teacher guides a student towards a margam or path. Some students choose to perform an Arangetram, also known as ascending the stage, which should not be considered a graduation performance but rather a beginning.”

Even moving to Dallas in 1995 to work on her doctorate in Physics at the University of Texas at Dallas couldn’t deter Venkatraman from continuing her Bharatanatyam training. Taking a friend’s suggestion Venkatraman went to take class at Arathi School of Dance where she met Guru Smt. Revathi Satyu. “My Guru Revathi Satyu is an amazing individual. As a guru she has taught me to love and appreciate the art not just as a student but also as a teacher. She is extremely patient, always smiling and most importantly always willing to share the art wholeheartedly.” Venkatraman has been teaching at Arathi for several years and her students have performed throughout the DFW area.

Venkatraman adds that if it wasn’t for Satyu Dallas audiences would know very little about Indian dance and the Indian culture. “Revathi is a pioneer in bringing the art of Bharatanatyam to Dallas. She started the Arathi School of Dance in Dallas in 1980 and has graduated over a 100 students. She has been responsible for spreading the awareness of Indian classical dance among Indian and non-Indian audiences. Through workshops, presentations and performances she continues to touch more and more people in the DFW metroplex.”

Photo: Courtesy
Photo: Courtesy

Since its conception, Indique Dance Company has presented several productions, including RootsMaa: The Many faces of Motherhood and Jeeva:  Synergy in Nature. The company will present a dance from Jeeva: Synergy in Nature called Thillana at the inaugural Dallas DanceFest happening this weekend at DCPH. The three-day event is being put on by the Dance Council of North Texas. Choreographed by Shalini Varghese and Bhuvana Venkatraman with music by Indian Rock band AGAM, Thillana features quick foot work, complex rhythms and intricate body poses. “Thillana is a classical Indian dance that has no storytelling. It’s a very happy, brisk dance that involves a lot of complex foot work and body movements.”

And while Dallas DanceFest will be the first time for many local dance companies to perform in the two-year-old City Performance Hall, that is not the case for Indique Dance Company who just performed there two weeks ago. “The DCPH is one of our favorite in-door performance spaces. The intimate setting is something we really enjoy. It makes it easier for us to have a conversation with the audience.”

» Indique Dance Company will perform at the Friday night showcase, 8 p.m. Aug. 29, at Dallas City Performance Hall. The other companies performing Friday are: Dallas Ballet Company, Ewert & Company, Rhythmic Souls, Dallas Black Dance Theatre II, Dark Circles Contemporary Dance, Texas Ballet Theater, Southern Methodist University Meadows Dance Ensemble, Dallas Black Dance Theatre.

» Companies performing Saturday are: Chamberlain Performing Arts, Chado Danse, Houston METdance, Avant Chamber Ballet, Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts Rep I and II companies, Tarrant County College Movers Unlimited, Mejia Ballet International, Bruce Wood Dance Project

» The Dance Council Honors are Sunday at 2 p.m., honoring Nita Braun, Ann Briggs-Cutaia and Joe Cutaia, Buster Cooper, Dylis Croman, Suzie Jary and Beth Wortley, with performances by Ballet Ensemble of Texas, Bruce Wood Dance Project and 2014 Dance Council Scholarship Recipients.

Head of Booker T. Washington Dance Department to Retire

Courtesy
Courtesy

Lily Weiss on four decades of educating young dancers and her upcoming retirement.

For almost 40 years Lily Weiss has been cultivating young talent here in Dallas, 14 of which she has spent as the head of the Dance Department at Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts (BTWHSPVA) in Downtown Dallas. “I remember when it was just us, Dallas Black Dance Theatre and the Dallas Museum of Art,” Weiss says. “A lot has changed since then.”

And the community is about to face another change as Weiss plans to retire at the end of this year, sort of. Per the request of her principal, Weiss will return next school year to help manage the transition to a new department head and new faculty. “Never have we had a head and two faculty leaving at the same time so, I agreed to one more year to help with the transition, but that is it.”

Weiss has spent most of her life preparing young dancers for their professional careers. She received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in dance from Texas Woman’s University and taught at Southern Methodist University and Houston’s HSPVA before joining the faculty at BTWHSPVA in 1978.

Her accolades include the National Young Arts Foundation Distinguished Teacher Award, Distinguished Teacher by the Commission on Presidential Scholars ten different years by 11 students, SURDNA Arts Teacher Fellowship, the Texas Dance Educator Award, the Bates Dance Festival Teacher Fellowship and Distinguished Teacher from the Rockefeller Foundation. She is currently on the Board of TITAS and the Steering Committee for the Bruce Wood Dance Project since 2011.

“I plan to continue working in the arts in some capacity after I retire, but I am going to take a year to explore new opportunities. I am looking forward to having more time for myself.” As to why she chose now to retire Weiss says that the timing just felt right. “I love teaching, but I have seen too many people stay past their time and in the end it’s really the kids who suffer.”

During her tenure at BTWHSPVA Weiss has seen the school and dance program grow by leaps and bounds. “For the first several years back in the 70s’ and 80s’ and really even into the year 2000 we had an average of 90-100 dance majors. When we moved into the new building we jumped to 140 dance majors in 2010. In the last four years we have seen an exponential jump in enrollment. We are now at 215 dance major.”

That isn’t the only number Weiss has seen grow over the last few years. She adds that since the dance department moved into the new building back in 2008 they have seen a steady climb in the number of dance major applicants. “We usually had under 100 students audition and in those days we had maybe 35 slots for freshman. Now we have almost 200 auditioning for us and 50 slots for freshman.” Weiss attributes the most recent applicant increase to the school’s location which is situated right in the middle of the expanding Dallas Arts District in between Dallas Black Dance Theatre and the AT&T Performing Arts Center. “I think there are more trained dancers now whose parents want them to come to this kind of situation where they have more opportunities to participate in learning labs, internships and performances.”

When asked what she is going to miss the most Weiss says, “The kids without a doubt. They have such a great energy. It’s so nice being around people who are willing to do anything and aren’t jaded. I’m really going to miss that.”