Tag Archives: Epiphany DanceArts

Get Crackin’

Get into the holiday spirit with any one of these Nutcracker productions, from the traditional to Nearly Naked, offer across Dallas-Fort Worth. Plus a list of other holiday dance.

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The Nutcracker from Texas Ballet Theate. Photo: Steven Visneau

It’s that time of year again! In between all the shopping, decorating and baking you have planned this holiday season make sure you set some time aside to check out one of the numerous Nutcracker productions being offered by many of the professional and pre-professional dance companies across Dallas-Fort Worth. For audiences west of the DFW Airport, Texas Ballet Theater will be running Ben Stevenson’s version of The Nutcracker for multiple weekends at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth. Additionally, Ballet Frontier of Texas and North Central Civic Ballet will be presenting their annual Nutcracker performances at Will Rogers Auditorium.

For residents north of Dallas there are myriad Nutcrackers to choose from, including versions by LakeCities Ballet Theatre in Lewisville, Festival Ballet of North Central Texas in Denton, and Allen Civic Ballet in Allen. The Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson, will soon be bursting with holiday cheer when Chamberlain Performing Arts, Dallas Repertoire Ballet, Royale Ballet Dance Academy, Tuzer Ballet and Collin County Ballet Theatre bring their Nutcracker productions here beginning Thanksgiving weekend and continuing till Christmas. The Irving Arts Center is another popular venue for local Nutcracker productions, including versions by Ballet Ensemble of Texas, International Ballet Theater and Momentum Dance Company. And in Dallas the Moscow Ballet returns to McFarlin Auditorium at Southern Methodist University with its rendition of The Great Russian Nutcracker, featuring new costumes and set designs.

You can even hear Tchaikovsky’s full Nutcracker played by the Dallas Symphony, without dancers, if you’re so inclined.

And if you are in need of a change this season, check out any number of the holiday dance shows being offered, including Avant Chamber Ballet’s Holiday Celebration at Dallas City Performance Hall; Epiphany DanceArts Tis the Season at the Eisemann; Texas Ballet Theater’s The Nutty Nutcracker at Bass Performance Hall; and even a burlesque show in Dallas aptly named Nearly Naked Nutcracker. A full list of all the Nutcrackers and holiday productions in the area can be found below.

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Sarah Lane (ABT) and Daniel Ulbricht (NYCB) as the Sugar Plum Fairy and Cavalier in LBT’s 2014 version of The Nutcracker. Photo: Nancy Loch

Nov. 20-21 Ballet Frontier of Texas presents The Nutcracker with choreography by Chung-Lin Tseng at Will Rogers Auditorium in Fort Worth. $40-$50. Call 817-689-7310 or visit www.balletfrontier.org

Nov. 20-22 Moscow Ballet return to Dallas with its rendition of The Great Russian Nutcracker at Southern Methodist University’s McFarlin Auditorium. This year’s production features new costumes for Act I by designer Arthur Oliver and two new backdrops by Academy Award Nominee Carl Sprague. $28-$88. Call 800-745-3000 or visit www.tickmaster.com

Nov. 27-29 Chamberlain Performing Arts annual showing of The Nutcracker featuring New York City Ballet Principal’s Tiler Peck and Tyler Angle at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson. $15-$100. Call 972-744-4650 or visit www.eisemanncenter.com

Nov. 27-29 Momentum Dance Company brings the holiday tale to life with choreography by Jacquelyn Ralls Forcher at the Irving Arts Center. $15-$25. Call 972-252-2787 or visit www.irvingartscenter.com

Nov. 28-29 LakeCities Ballet Theatre celebrates its 25th annual production of The Nutcracker which features live music from Lewisville Lake Symphony and guest artists Sarah Lane of American Ballet Theater and Daniel Ulbricht of New York City Ballet. $20-$45. Call 972-317-7987 or visitwww.lakecitiesballet.org

Dec. 4-6 Dallas Ballet Company presents The Nutcracker featuring guest artists April Daly and Miguel Blanco from Joffrey Ballet at the Granville Arts Center in Garland. $23-$24. Call 972-205-2790 or visit www.garlandarts.com

Dec. 5 Local dancers Harry Feril (Bruce Wood Dance Project) and Yulia Ilina (Avant Chamber Ballet) join theInternational Ballet Theater for its production of The Nutcracker Sweet at the Irving Arts Center. $28-$38. Call 972-252-2787 or visit www.irvingartscenter.com

Dec. 5-6 Ballet Ensemble of Texas, under the direction of Joffrey alum Lisa Slagle, presents the holiday classic at the Irving Arts Center. $25-$30. Call 972-252-2787 or visit www.irvingartscenter.com

Dec. 5-6 Rowlett Dance Academy presents its 14th annual production of The Nutcracker at Garland High School. $10. Call 972-475-8269 or visit www.rowlettdanceacademy.com

Dec. 5-6 Royale Ballet Dance Academy offering of The Nutcracker at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson. $20-$25. Call 972-744-4650 or visit www.eisemanncenter.com

Dec. 5-6 North Central Civic Ballet’s rendition of The Nutcracker at the Will Rogers Auditorium in Fort Worth. $30. Visit www.nutcrackertickets.com

Dec. 5-10 New York City Ballet brings George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker to the big screen in various movies across the DFW Metroplex. $16-$18 Adult. Visit www.fathomevent.com 

Dec. 11-27 Texas Ballet Theater takes the stage with Ben Stevenson’s version of The Nutcracker at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth. Call 877-828-9200 or visit www.texasballettheater.org

Dec. 11-13 Dallas Repertoire Ballet brings its rendition of the beloved holiday tale to the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson. $22-$42. Call 972-744-4650 or visitwww.eisemanncenter.com

Dec. 12 Colleyville Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker for one-night only at the Irving Arts Center. $25-$30. Call 972-252-2787 or visit www.irvingartscenter.com

Dec. 12-13 Festival Ballet of North Central Texas showing of The Nutcracker at Texas Woman’s University, Margo Jones Performance Hall in Denton. $11-$36. Call 940.891.0830 or visit www.festivalballet.net

Dec. 19-20 Tuzer Ballet presents The Nutcracker with guest artists Rie Ichikawa (Boston Ballet) and Zack Grubbs (Cincinnati Ballet) at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson. $15-$50. Call 972-744-4650 or visitwww.eisemanncenter.com

Dec. 19-20 The Allen Civic Ballet presents its annual production of the holiday classic with live musical accompaniment by the Allen Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra at the Allen High School Performing Arts Center in Allen. $15-$25. Visit www.allencivicballet.org/nutracker

Dec. 19 The Art Ballet Academy presents The Nutcracker at Mansfield ISD Center for the Performing Arts, Mansfield. $16. Visit www.abacademy.com

Dec. 22-23 Collin County Ballet Theatre’s annual production of The Nutcracker features live music from Plano Symphony Orchestra at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson. $22-$77. Call 972-744-4650 or visitwww.eisemanncenter.com

 

OTHER HOLIDAY DANCE

(including non-traditional takes on The Nutcracker)

Nov. 19 Avant Chamber Ballet returns to White’s Chapel United Methodist Church in Southlake with its holiday production of Nutcracker: Short and Suite. This one-act Nutcracker presented by Apex Arts League includes new choreography by Katie Cooper and music by Tchaikovsky. $15-$20. Call 800-481-8914 or visit www.apex-arts.org

ACB
Avant Chamber Ballet will present Holiday Celebration. Photo: Mark Kitaoka

Nov. 27-29 The Dallas Symphony Orchestra plays Tchaikovsky’s complete The Nutcracker (no dancers), and featuring the Children’s Chorus of Collin County, at the Meyerson Symphony Center, Dallas. Call 214-692-0203 or visit www.mydso.com

Nov. 27-Dec. 27 MBS Productions presents its annual hit The Beulaville Baptist Book Club Presents a Bur-Less-Q Nutcracker, in which a church has to do a last minute substitution of its dancers for The Nutcracker, at the Addison Theatre Centre’s Studio Theatre. $29. Call 214-477-4942 or visit www.mbsproductions.net

Dec. 6 8&1 Dance Company closes its third season with In The Spirit, featuring live music and heart-warming chorography at the Quixotic Word in Dallas. Visit www.8and1dance.com 

Dec. 6 Dallas Youth Ballet presents a Rockefeller Christmas Spectacular at Dallas City Performance Hall with special guest Arron Scott from American Ballet Theatre. $20-$75. Visitwww.parkcitiesstudios.com

Dec. 10 Avant Chamber Ballet’s Holiday celebration at Dallas City Performance Hall incudes Katie Cooper’s Sleigh Ride and Nutcracker: Short and Suite. $20-$30. Visit www.ticketdfw.com

Dec. 11-12 Bruce Wood Dance Project presents a Christmas Cabaret benefit with Broadway stars Aaron Lazar, Liz Callaway and Joseph Thalken, at the BWDP Studio, 3630 Harry Hines Boulevard, Suite 36, Dallas. $350-$1,000. Call 214-428-2263 or visit www.brucewooddance.org

Dec. 12 Ballet Concerto presents its annual A Holiday Special at Will Rogers Auditorium in Fort Worth. The program includes Winter Wonderland, The Princess and the Magical Christmas Star, O Holy Night and A Cool Yule. $8 for daytime performances and $12-$25 for the evening performance. Call 817-738-7915 or visit www.balletconcerto.com

Dec. 12 Contemporary Ballet Dallas offers their spin on Charles Dickens’ classic tale with Boogie Woogie Christmas Carol at McFarlin Memorial Auditorium on the Southern Methodist University campus. $18-$30. Visitwww.contemporaryballetdallas.com

Dec. 18 Texas Ballet Theater brings The Nutty Nutcracker, its PG-13 spoof of The Nutcracker, to Bass Performance Hall for one night only. $40-250. Call 877.828.9200 or visit www.texasballettheater.org

Dec. 18-19 Epiphany DanceArts celebrates the holiday season with its production of Tis the Season at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson. $17-$27. Call 972-744-4650 or visit www.eisemanncenter.com

Dec. 19 Broads & Panties presents Nearly Naked Nutcracker: A Burlesque Ballet featuring aerial performances, circus arts, ballet and burlesque at Trees in Deep Ellum. $20-$44. Visit www.treesdallas.com

Dec. 19-20 Denton City Contemporary Ballet presents A Gift for Emma at Margo Jones Performance Hall at Texas Woman’s University, Denton. $15-25. Call 940-383-2623 or visit www.dentoncitycontemporary.org

Dec. 19-20 ImPULSE Dance Project celebrates the season with Snow at the Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theater. Program includes works by Artistic Director Anastasia Waters and company members Krista Langford and Kristin Daniels. $17. Visit www.impusedanceproject.org

This list was originally published on TheaterJones.com.

 

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Review: Epiphany DanceArts, Diamonds

Epiphany DanceArts in Diamonds at the Eisemann Center. Photo: Sarah Beal
Epiphany DanceArts in Diamonds at the Eisemann Center. Photo: Sarah Beal

Precious Gem

Epiphany DanceArts stretches itself technically and emotionally in an encore performance of Diamonds at the Eisemann Center.

Richardson — Bold. Edgy. Emotionally volatile. One wouldn’t typically use these words to describe Epiphany DanceArts. Created by Melissa DeGroat six years ago, Epiphany has made a name for itself in the Dallas dance scene with its strong storytelling, uplifting content, and unique blend of ballet and liturgical movement stylings. But as everyone in the dance community knows, the key to surviving in this oversaturated market is to keep evolving, which is exactly what Epiphany did last season with its compelling work Diamonds. The show was so well-received that the company decided to bring it back for an encore at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson this past weekend.

In Diamonds, which is inspired by Max Lucado’s children’s book You Are Special, DeGroat uses removable fabric swatches adorned with either dots or stars to express the internal battle everyone goes through when choosing between who they want to be versus who everyone expects them to be. Throughout the 75-minute work the dancers depict identity struggles that show in poignant movement choices, especially the removal of the dot and star swatches at the end.

The “diamond” element of the story is depicted through Abel Garcia’s live painting during the show, of a dancer suspended upside down. Garcia’s pastel-colored strokes worked in sharp contrast to the black and red tones presented onstage. Unlike other live collaborations I’ve seen, here Garcia and the dancers maintained a connection throughout the performance, sometimes by simply stopping what they were doing to make eye contact, or in DeGroat’s case, by coming over and dancing in Garcia’s space. DeGroat’s opening solo effectively introduced Garcia into the storyline. She kept her movements simple yet deep, with sweeping arm gestures, shifting leg extensions and breathy body contractions as Garcia worked behind her.

Unlike past Epiphany productions where the focus was on a singular emotion such as love or loss, in Diamonds DeGroat pushes her dancers to emote myriad feelings on this winding journey of self-discovery. And while all 13 dancers displayed beautiful body lyricism and natural facial expressions, some delivered more feeling than others. For example, in several stop-action moments in the opening number, the dancers needed to exude energy from every inch of their bodies while holding various poses.

Epiphany veterans DeGroat, Ivy Koval and Anna Wueller Diaz commanded the audience’s attention with their unending lines and wonderful use of breath in their sustained movements. In contrast, at times the newest company members held too much tension in their chests, causing their forms to shrink instead of expand. The dancers’ diagonal pathway was a great use of symbolism, cleverly used throughout the show.

With a playlist that included music by the Piano Guys, the XX, Two Steps from Hell, Fort Minor and Bruce Rowland, choreographers DeGroat, Koval and Jennifer Guess challenged the dancers with tricky ballet sequences and sharper movement quality. In one of the most dynamic dance sequences, the dancers had to dig deep to control their leg extensions and stag leaps while their hands remained bound. The dancers rose to the challenge with seamless standing-to-floor transitions and wicked pirouettes.

The group also got to exercise their acting chops in sections such as “Hurting People Hurt People,” where they stood whispering and ignoring people before physically engaging one another. Later, as Diaz contorted into various yoga-type poses, the others stood making faces in the background.

The final dance, performed to an instrumental medley of “Over the Rainbow” and the Shaker hymn “Simple Gifts,” encompassed everything audiences have come to appreciate about Epiphany DanceArts, including elegant technique, unique musicality and strong emotional content. This has been the company’s most cohesive and captivating production to date. It will be interesting to see what it brings to the table for its December holiday performance.

This review was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

Review: 13th Annual Plano Dance Festival

Plano Metropolitan Ballet performs at the 13th Plano Dance Festival. Photo: Sharen Bradford/The Dancing Image
Plano Metropolitan Ballet performs at the 13th Plano Dance Festival. Photo: Sharen Bradford/The Dancing Image

Deluxe Package

The 13th Annual Plano Dance Festival delivers fine technique and a diverse array of dance styles with the aid of some local dance companies.

Plano — It’s always nice to step away from the professional dance scene in Dallas and see what the local dance community is up to. And if the Plano Dance Festival on Saturday afternoon was any indication, these pre-professional groups have been busy exposing their dancers to different techniques to add to their wheelhouse and build self-confidence. The festival, which took place at the Courtyard Theater in Plano, had an even balance of traditional and contemporary ballet pieces intermixed with other dance styles, including tap, modern and Chinese folk dance.

For hardcore balletomanes there was Marius Petipa’s La Bayadere solo performed by Avant Ballet Chamber company member Yulia Ilina, as well as Mikhail Fokine’s memorable Dying Swan solo performed by guest dancer Melian Izotova from Colorado-based Premiere Ballet. Ilina’s supple feet and lethal legs were a perfect match for Petipa’s slow, controlled bourres, alternating promenades and multiple arabesque holds. And Izotova completely embodied the role of the swan with her exacting point work and rippling arm movements resembling a swan’s wings.

Dallas-based professional dancers Lea Zablocki and Shea Johnson gave a spot on performance with August Bournonville’s Flower Festival in Genzano. Like all classic story ballets, the movement in this pas de deux consisted of exaggerated gesturing and heart-felt embraces. Johnson’s control over his landings has improved, adding polish to his already clean technique. Zablocki excelled in her turning sections executing multiple pirouettes in quick succession without a hitch. The press-up lifts from the knees in the Romeo and Juliet piece proved challenging for Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet’s David Sanders, but he recovered to complete the passionate number with fellow company member Katie Stasse.

Avant Chamber Ballet performs at the 13th Plano Dance Festival. Photo: Sharen Bradford/The Dancing Image
Avant Chamber Ballet performs at the 13th Plano Dance Festival. Photo: Sharen Bradford/The Dancing Image

The most surprising classical performance of the afternoon came from the festival’s host company, Plano Metropolitan Ballet (PMB), in the opening number pointe number Meridian. Dressed in deep blue leotards and white tutus, the 14 dancers showed both technical and musical growth in this invigorating piece set to The Vitamin String Quartet and choreographed by Madelaine Boyce. Standard ballet phrases such as tombe pas de bourre soutenu, pirouettes, and alternating epaulement(shoulder, head and neck) positions were livened up with continuous formation changes and musically-timed cannon arrangements. Boyce’s choreography also adequately displayed the dancers’ proficiency in both allegro and adagio movement and was well received by the audience.

In the realm of contemporary ballet there was Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet’s You Are a Memory and Avant Chamber Ballet’s Endless Arc, a new work by Artistic Director Katie Puder. In the first, dancers Katie Stasse, Laura Pearson and Emily Gnatt performed a series of rudimentary ballet steps mixed with more contemporary movements such as flat-footed walks, hand gestures and body contractions. The two dancers dressed in white pulled the third, dressed in red, through a number of interweaving body positions before finally pulling away from one another. Music by Ryuichi Sakamoto and dim lighting only added to the somber tone of the piece. Puder’s Endless Arc was more aggressive compared to previous works, but still contained all the elements that we admire about her, including continuous traveling movements, abrupt direction changes and dynamic partnering skills. Both pieces were just peaking when they suddenly ended in a blackout.

The Gaudium Dance Movement captured the audience’s attention with its star-spotted back lighting and pillow props in Gina Lee’s Midnight. The dance started out promising with the four dancers traveling across the space on their backs using the pillows as leverage. The dancers then travelled around the pillows as they resisted the space with arm reaches and open-chested releases. The pillows are re-introduced at the end when the dancers pulled chains and rope from the pillowcases before the lights faded out, leaving the audience to question their significance.

Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet performs at the 13th Plano Dance Festival. Photo: Sharen Bradford/The Dancing Image
Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet performs at the 13th Plano Dance Festival. Photo: Sharen Bradford/The Dancing Image

Epiphany DanceArts performed excerpts from Balanchine’s Diamonds in which they acted out the effects bullying has on society through their signature lyrical movements blended with more sultry and staccato steps to music by The XX and The Piano Guys. Collin College’s Collin Dance Ensemble and Dallas Black Dance Academy’s Senior Performing Ensemble both demonstrated basic modern dance techniques (i.e. Martha Graham and Merce Cunningham) in Tread and This Place is a Shelter. The Dallas Black Dance Academy Seniors also performed a rhythmic African-infused piece entitled Confluence.

The program also included some wickedly fly and fun footwork from Dallas-based Rhythmic Souls Youth Residency and Choreo Records Tap Ensemble as well as some beautifully intricate Chinese folk dance from Jiaping Shi Dance School.

Festival coordinator and Plano Metropolitan Ballet Artistic Director Cindi Lawrence Hanson should be pleased with how her group and the festival have grown over the last 13 years. Audiences should look forward to what she has in store for next year’s event.

This review was originally published on TheaterJones.com.

Review: Ballet Fete, Collin County Ballet Theatre

Guest artists Michele Gifford and Ronnie Underwood perform a Pas De Deux from Sylvia. Photo: Fermaint Photography.
Guest artists Michele Gifford and Ronnie Underwood perform a Pas De Deux from Sylvia.
Photo: Fermaint Photography.

Collin County Ballet Theatre effectively hits on every part of the ballet spectrum with the help of some local talent in Balle Fete Esprit de Danse.

Richardson — From classical and romantic to contemporary and avant garde, Collin County Ballet Theatre’sBallet Fete Esprit de Danse had something for everyone to enjoy at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts last weekend. To accomplish such a feat CCBT Directors Kirt and Linda Hathaway called upon some local dance companies for assistance, including Ballet Frontier of Texas, Epiphany DanceArts and Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet as well as guest artists Yuliia Ilina, Michele Gifford, Harry Feril and Ronnie Underwood. What could have been an unbalanced collaboration was instead an exciting display of varying balletic forms and individual artistry with a couple of standout moments from CCBT’s own pre-professional company members.

The show opened with Kirt Hathaway’s Simple Symphony which had its premiere in 1982 with Lexington Ballet. Like the title states, this piece was very simple, from the pointe work to the formation changes, but by no means boring. The rudimentary steps (bourrées, changements, jetes) were done with exacting precision and uniformity. The six dancers skimmed across the floor with their triplets and bourrees as they weaved through one another. While the dancers point work was not always in sync, they paid meticulous care to their upper body positioning. Ilina and Feril’s pas e deux was a lesson in partner proficiency and artistic expression. Ilina’s wicked extensions and technical poignancy was complemented by Feril’s undeniable strength and innate ability to anticipate his partner’s needs. They never missed a hand connection and Feril handled the tricky press up lifts with ease.

Next up was August Bournonville’s (1805-1879) Reel performed by Ballet Frontier of Texas to music by Lovenskold. Dressed in white tops, plaid kilts, black knee socks and character or jazz shoes, this 31-person ensemble performed a fast-paced Scottish jig that featured rhythmic stomping, quick partner exchanges and continuous formation changes. Bournonville was not into flashy jumps or overheated gestures and he preferred accenting the downbeat in the music; the dancers took to Bournonville’s demi-character style with a vigor that left the audience breathless by the end.

Epiphany DanceArts piece, Rebirth, fused classical ballet technique with the expressive gesturing and wide arcing movement that we have come to expect from the group. The 12 dancers, dressed in various black tops and bottoms, executed a number of leg tilts, side reaches and back lunges as they continuously ran diagonally across the stage. A mashup of Beethoven and One Republic’s “5 Secrets” covered by The Piano Guys only heightened the sense of urgency in the dancers’ movements.

The most surprising work of the evening came from Dallas Neo-Classical Ballet. Choreographed by Victoria TranShades draws from the mythological idea that ghosts or spirits of the dead reside in the shadows of the underworld, according to the program notes. The movement is inspired by butoh, a form of avant garde performance art that arose in Japan in 1959. Adorned in flimsy white dresses and pale-painted faces or painted bodies as in David Sanders case, the dancers moved stiffly around stage as if in a trance, stopping intermittently to convulse or lackadaisically sway side to side. Their body shapes were disjointed (broken wrist and turn-in feet) and everything was done in a slow manner to the unsettling hum of Tibetan singing bowls.

The second half showcased the more traditional side of ballet with CCBT’s Mendelssohn, Longing for Spring and Le Corsaire Divertissement as well as the Snow scene from The Nutcracker performed by Ballet Frontier of Texas andSylvia Pas de Deux choreographed by Paul Mejia and performed by guest artists Michele Gifford and Ronnie Underwood (Oklahoma City Ballet). Gifford’s strengths came forth in her flexible spine and dynamic leaps and turns. Underwood surprised us all with his technical grace and exquisitely soft landings despite his broader frame.

It was hard to take your eyes off CCBT company member Kade Cummings in Mendelssohn and Le Corsaire Divertissement. He has come a long way over the last two years. Gone is the cheeky Fitz (The Nutcracker) character and in his place a more disciplined dancer. He oozed grace and confidence. His far-reaching lines, precision turns and effortless jumps set him apart from the other dancers. CCBT member Emily Dunaway displayed great emotional depth with her solo in Ilina’s Longing for Spring. Her conviction could be seen from her tense fingertips down to her punctuated pointe work.

This review was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

Dance Council of North Texas Unveils New Festival

A New Dance Festival is Coming to Dallas!

Dallas, TX – New Name! New Stage! New Vision! was the mantra of the Dance Council of North Texas’ (DCNT) luncheon Friday afternoon as the organization officially announced the new Dallas DanceFest Aug. 29-31, 2014.

According to the fact sheet, the festival will take place Friday and Saturday evening at the new Dallas City Performance Hall with Sunday reserved for the DCNT Honors which is typically held in September. Information about ticketing and the application process will be made available soon.

Friday’s luncheon drew about 75-100 people including choreographers, dance company heads, arts media, city council and arts organization members. I saw my buddy Josh Peugh (AD of Dark Circles Contemporary Dance), my editor Mark Lowry (TheaterJones.com), TITAS Executive Director Charles Santos, dance critic Margaret Putnam (the lady I one day hope to be) and the lovely Ann Williams who be retiring as the AD of Dallas Black Dance Theatre at the end of this season. I also met Anne Bothwell of Art&Seek, Melissa DeGroat (AD Epiphany DanceArts) and Katie Puder (AD Avant Chamber Ballet).

DCNT Executive Director Pam Deslorieux said she was very pleased with the turnout and everyone appears to be very excited about the new festival.

I was just excited to see so many of the up and coming dance companies at the luncheon including Avant Chamber Ballet, Dark Circles Contemporary Dance and Epiphany DanceArts. These companies are the future and we as an arts community must do whatever we can to cultivate their talent. Sorry if that sounds preachy, but it’s true

More information about Dallas DanceFest 2014 is available at www.DallasDanceFest.org.

Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut

Photo: Ellen Appel Texas Ballet Theater's The Nutcracker
Photo: Ellen Appel
Texas Ballet Theater’s The Nutcracker

The holiday season is upon us, and you know what that means: The Nutcracker. Here’s our round-up of local Nutcrackers, plus non-Nut holiday dance.

It’s the holidays, and in the dance world, that means nuts are about to be crackin’ all over the place. North Texas will be filled with performances of The Nutcracker, which means box offices will be singing, parents and grandparents will be thrilled at seeing their kids in the party scene, and little girls will see the Sugar Plum Fairy and be inspired to take ballet lessons.

Beginning this weekend, as the Moscow Ballet returns, you can see at least one performance of The Nutcracker each weekend if you like, right up through a few days before Christmas. We’ve also included some pretty different takes on The Nut, as the dancers call it, from theater outfits Dallas Children’s Theater (marionettes!) and MBS Productions (burlesque!).

And, because there are a few brave dance companies out there willing to do a holiday dance production sans the Snow Queen, we’ve also included the few non-Nut shows.

LET’S START WITH THOSE:

Denton City Contemporary Ballet presents A Gift for Emma Nov. 22 – 24 at Krum High School Performance Center in Krum, Texas. Ticket Office: www.dentondance.com

Contemporary Ballet Dallas presents a Boogie Woogie Christmas Carol, inspired by the Dickens tale, Dec. 7 at Southern Methodist University’s McFarlin Auditorium. Ticket Office:www.contemporaryballetdallas.com

Dallas Metropolitan Ballet presents The Night Before Christmas Dec. 14 – Dec. 15 at Southern Methodist University’s McFarlin Auditorium in Dallas. Tickets: $10 – $40. Ticket Office: www.ticketmaster.com or call 214-631-2787 or 817-467-2787

Epiphany DanceArts presents Christmas Memories Dec. 20-21 at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson, Texas. Tickets: $15 – $29. Ticket Office:www.epiphanydancearts.org or call 972-744-4650

AND NOW, THE NUTCRACKERS:

Moscow Ballet brings back The Great Russian Nutcracker to Dallas Nov. 15 and Nov. 17 at Southern Methodist University’s McFarlin Auditorium. Tickets: $28. Ticket Office: www.nutcracker.com or call 800-320-1733

Ballet Frontier of Texas presents its rendition of The Nutcracker Nov. 22 – 23 at the Will Rogers Auditorium in Fort Worth, Texas. Tickets: $25. Ticket Office: www.balletfrontier.org

MBS Productions returns with its annual revival of the comedy The Beulaville Baptist Book Club Presents a Bur-Less-Q Nutcracker, in which a burlesque troupe saves the day in a small Texas town by performing the holiday classic. Nov 23-Dec. 29 at the Stone Cottage on the campus of the Addison Theatre Centere. Tickets: $18-$27. Ticket Office: www.mbsproductions.net

Chamberlain Performing Arts presents The Nutcracker featuring New York City Ballet principal dancers Tiler Peck and Tyler Angle Nov. 29 – Dec. 1 at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson, Texas. Ticket Office: www.eisemanncenter.com or call 972-744-4650

Texas Ballet Theater presents Ben Stevenson’s The Nutcracker which runs Nov. 29 – Dec. 8 at the Winspear Opera House in Dallas and Dec. 13 – 27 at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth. Ticket Office: www.texasballettheater.org

Kathy Burks Theatre of Puppetry Art’s presents its interpretation of The Nutcracker Nov. 29 – Dec. 22 at the Dallas Children’s Theater in Dallas. Tickets: $13 – $40. Ticket Office: www.dct.org or call 214-740-0051

Photo: Karen Almond Kathy Burks Theatre of Puppetry Arts' The Nutcracker at Dallas Children's Theater
Photo: Karen Almond
Kathy Burks Theatre of Puppetry Arts’ The Nutcracker at Dallas Children’s Theater

LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s rendition of The Nutcracker runs Nov. 30 – Dec. 1 at Marcus High School in Flower Mound, Texas, and Dec. 14 – 15 at Little Elem Recreation Center. Ticket Office: www.lakecitiesballet.com

Momentum Dance Company does The Nutcracker with guests Michele Gifford, Shea Johnson and Bruce Coleman. Nov. 29-Dec. 1 at the Irving Arts Center. Tickets: $15-$25. Ticket Office: www.irvingartscenter or call 972-252-2787

Dallas Ballet Company will be celebrating its 27th annual performance of The Nutcracker Dec. 6 – Dec. 8 at the Granville Arts Center in Garland, Texas. Tickets: $23. Ticket Office: www.garlandarts.com or call 972-205-2790

The Dallas Youth Ballet presents The Nutcracker Dec. 7 at the new Dallas City Performance Hall in the Dallas Arts District. Tickets: $15 – $35. Ticket Office: www.thedallasconservatory.org or call 214-357-8888

The Ballet Ensemble of Texas brings its rendition of The Nutcracker to the Irving Arts Center Dec. 7 – 8. Tickets: $21-$26. Ticket Office: www.irvingartscenter or call 972-252-2787

The Dallas Repertoire Ballet presents The Nutcracker Dec.13-15 at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson, Texas. Tickets: $15 – $50. Ticket Office: www.eisemanncenter.com or call 972-744-4650

Festival Ballet of North Central Texas will be performing The Nutcracker Dec. 14 – 15 at the Margo Jones Performance Hall at Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas. Tickets: $11 – $36. Ticket Office: www.festivalballet.net or call 940-891-0830

For a more adult Nutcracker performance Texas Ballet Theater offers The Nutty Nutcracker, a collaborative work between artistic staff and dancers featuring hot topics of the past 12 months. The performance is slated for Dec. 20 at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth. Ticket Office: www.texasballettheater.org

Tuzer Ballet presents The Nutcracker Dec. 21-22 at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson, Texas. Tickets: $15 – $50. Ticket Office: www.eisemanncenter.com or call 972-744-4650

The Allen Civic Ballet presents its 15th anniversary production of The Nutcracker Dec. 21 – Dec. 22 at the Performing Arts Center at Allen High School. Tickets: $15 – $30. Ticket Office: www.allencivicballet.org

Collin County Ballet Theatre presents The Nutcracker Dec. 23-24 at the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts in Richardson, Texas. Tickets: $15 – $75. Ticket Office: www.eisemanncenter.com or call 972-744-4650

This roundup was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.