Tag Archives: Halloween

Preview: DGDG’s The Bippy Bobby Boo Show

Ghoulish Games

Photo: Anthony Lazon
The cast of The Bippy Bobby Boo Show

 

Danielle Georgiou Dance Group puts a spooky twist on 1960s musical variety TV with The Bippy Bobby Boo Show at Theatre Three.

Dallas — Danielle Georgiou’s fascination with the social norms and entertainment icons of the 1950s and ‘60s have been the precursor for many of Danielle Georgiou Dance Group’s (DGDG) most memorable performances over the years, including NICE (2014), The Show About Men (2015) and Donkey Beach (2017).

In DGDG’s latest production, The Bippy Bobby Boo Show, co-creators Georgiou and Justin Locklear are using the structure of a ‘60s musical variety show to explore hot button issues surrounding sexuality, gender roles, cultural differences and even death.

To keep the mood from getting too heavy, the 15-member cast will address these themes through song and dance reminiscent of the era. Oh, and performers will be doing it all while portraying ghosts of former patrons and audience members of Theatre Three, which is where the company will be performing the show in the downstairs space, Theatre Too!, Oct. 25-Nov. 2

The script contains all the mirth and subtle sarcasm that we have come to expect in a DGDG performance, but Georgiou points out that the language has been toned down to fit within the parameters of what was deemed acceptable for T.V. during this time period.

“We are staying true to how shows were formed in the ‘60s. So the jokes are full of innuendos, but there are certain things that you couldn’t do or say in the ‘60s, and we are holding true to that because all of our ghosts are from that time period and don’t really know what would happen in 2019.”

Georgiou adds that even though the material addresses contemporary issues, we are still dealing with the same issues that we were dealing with in the ‘60s. With that said she does acknowledge that we have made advances as a society, but says historically we are still in the same place. “I’m not going to discredit the strides we have taken forward as a society, but universally we are still dealing with the same sorts of conceptual issues, including fear of the unknown, fear of different cultures and isolationism. So we are tackling those sorts of ideas in the show, but through, as we always do, a very comedic lens.”

She adds, “We also have the history of Theatre Three and the productions they have done in the past to be able to use theater as truly a mirror onto these ghosts and what they have seen throughout the 58 years of the theater.”

Georgiou goes on to explain that these ghosts have followed Theatre Three from each space it has inhabited over the company’s history from the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Dallas and a car seat factory in Deep Ellum to the theater’s current space in the Quadrangle.

“We just imagined that some of the patrons are really in love with the theater and just decided that that’s where they wanted to spend their afterlife,” Georgiou says about the show’s premise.

“So they have decided that they can be actors too and every night they put on their own show for each other. But Bippy Bobby has this idea that all the alive people need to come and see the show and so he comes up with a plan to get what we call the pre-dead down into the basement to watch the ghost’s show.”

Even though the show is centered on these ghostly characters, Georgiou is quick to say that the show is not intended to be scary. “This is a comedy show, so it’s goofy gags and thrills and some blood, but it happens in a very comedic way.”

Locklear plays late-night show host Bippy Bobby, who is a combination of many well-known hosts from the era, including Jack Linkletter, Jim O’Neill, Roger Miller and Dean Martin. Georgiou says there is even some of Beetlejuice’s wackiness in the character. If Locklear’s performance is anything like the kooky narrator role he did in Donkey Beach, then audiences are in for a good time.

What about that title, which rolls off the tongue.

Bippy Bobby Boo came from the fact that we knew we wanted to do a ghost story and also something that involved magic,” Georgiou says. “It also came from that Cinderella and Fairy Godmother moment because she basically gives Cinderella everything that she wants. So, we were trying to come up with names of a talk show host who hosted a late-night haunted variety show and we knew it had to be magical because this ghost character has a lot of powers and from there Bippy Bobby was born.”

As for the choreography, Georgiou says she is incorporating moves from well-known jazz choreographers making work in the ‘60s, including Bob Fosse and David Winters. “I wanted it to be what they would have made. So I watched a lot of Hullabaloo episodes and was heavily inspired by what those dancers were doing on that show.”

She continues, “Their movement was fast-paced, sharp, athletic and that’s a challenge because right now we are so contemporary dance-based and fluidity is what’s marketed as how dance is right now.”

For the last couple of years, Georgiou has been making choreography for and outside of DGDG that is solely jazz based. “There’s something that’s really beautiful and also incredible to watch as an audience member when you see 15 bodies doing exactly the same thing at the exact same time. Your brain doesn’t understand what it’s watching, and I’m interested in seeing if we can do it too.”

She adds, “I’ve spent the last seven to eight years doing one thing and I just felt like there is more that I want to explore as an artist. I also want to challenge myself too in what I’m making, and so this was, for me, the next step.”

>This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

Preview: LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s Dracula

A behind-the-scenes look at LakeCities Ballet Theatree’s upcoming performance of Le Ballet de Dracula in Lewisville.
Dracula
Photo: Nancy Loch Photography

Lewisville — If you are looking for something frightfully fun to do with the kiddos this Halloween, I suggest checking out LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s (LBT) fall production of Le Ballet de Dracula at the Medical City of Lewisville Grand Theater, Oct. 13-14. Complete with stellar set designs, creepy costuming, vibrant dancing and an easy to follow narrative thanks to a ghoulishly charming MC (Art Director Tom Rutherford), LBT’s Dracula has become a Halloween tradition for many families in the area, including mine. Having been a fan of the production for the last 6 years, I was excited to receive an invitation to LBT’s studio, which is located inside the Ballet Conservatory in Lewisville, to watch some rehearsal. While I was there, I got a behind the scenes look at the second half of the show, which features the brides of Dracula, and I also got the chance to talk to two of the lead performers.

I walked into rehearsal a few weekends ago while the company was going through spacing for the brides of Dracula section of the show. Known for her clean and creative choreography, it was no surprise Lannin spent most of the time tweaking the dancers’ formations and going over specific body nuances such as how the dancers should hold their hand over their hearts and where their eyes should be focused in their diagonal lines. Timing and musicality are especially important in this section as the music is very slow and purposeful so any mistakes the dancers make would be easily noticed by the audience. And with no make-up or costuming to hide behind, the dozen or so dancers really had to amp up their performance quality in order to make the scene more believable, which they accomplished with some encouragement from Lannin and artistic staff members Janet Waters and Deborah Weaver who also sat in during the rehearsal. For example, toward the end of the scene Lannin told the dancers, “You really need to explore your characters here. You once loved this man (Dracula). Do you still love him? Or are you angry about what he has done to you? Just really feel that pain and make this moment your own.”

The instructors also had no qualms about calling out corrections during the run-through, which the dancers eagerly took in. I attribute the dancers willingness to take corrections to Lannin’s nurturing teaching method, which seems to be especially effective for the baby brides, as she calls them, who are as young as 12. Lannin would calmly say things like “your body can not show the landing,” “Oh, that was not a pretty picture” and most importantly “you must be performing as you learn. We don’t have time to learn and then perform.”

Guest Artist Adrian Aguirre, a newcomer to the production, says he has really enjoyed working with Ms. Lannin in the studio. “Her critiques are always very constructive and uplifting. She also has a great sense of humor which I appreciate a lot.” He adds that he is the type of dancer that likes it when the music takes control of the movement and he found that to be true in this production, which he says made learning his role that much easier. Aquirre is a recent graduate of Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts and is also the founder of the dance group, Uno Mas, which made its debut at Dallas DanceFest last month.

During rehearsal I also got to sit down with LBT Company Member Carley Greene who plays Aurelia, the love interest of both Marius and Dracula. Now a high school junior, Greene has been steadily rising through the ranks of LBT, but it wasn’t until last spring that she had her breakout moment in Lannin’s And The Things That Remain at LBT’s Director’s Choice performance. She came out the gate then with a dynamic solo showcasing impressive body control and a new level of artistic maturity that I had yet to see from her. I was glad to see that her confidence and joy of dancing are still present in her Dracula performance. As for how Greene feels about playing the lead character in the ballet she says, “It has been a great challenge for me to portray a lot of different emotions while also dancing and interacting with everyone on stage. Aurelia is so special to me because of the various emotions I need to express and because I get to dance to music that is so climactic and nuanced.”

Lannin made a wise decision years ago to record every performance so the dancers can reference it to learn their new roles as well as to refresh their memories of group dances such as the maypole dance in the first half and the brides of Dracula in the second. By watching the videos Greene says she is able to determine how much she has grown from year to year. “I am a completely different dancer today than I was last year,” Greene says. “I think every year I get more comfortable with the material, but this year particularly I feel I am able to express myself more freely.”

>> This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

A Tasty Treat

The brides of Dracula in Act II. Photo: Nancy Loch

LakeCities Ballet Theatre delivers tricky technique and spooky surprises in Le Ballet de Dracula.

Lewisville — No one can resist a scary story involving weolas (bat-like creatures), vampire brides and Dracula. LakeCities Ballet Theatre drove this point home during its first sold-out performance of Le Ballet de Dracula Friday night at the Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theater.

The story, created by Tom Rutherford, takes place in a small Transylvanian town where the villagers are celebrating the engagement of protagonists Marius (Ruben Gerding) and Aurelia (Bridget Polei). The luminous sets and festive period costumes in harvest hues emphasized the joyous occasion; as did the choreography by LBT Artistic Director Kelly Kilburn Lannin.

Ruben Gerding and Bridget Polei’s pas de deux in Act 1. Photo: Nancy Loch

Marius and Aurelia’s hopeful pas de deux was an ode to young love. Gerding and Polei’s dark features and casual elegance made them well-suited for one another. Gerding’s lifts were effortless and Polei’s assisted triple pirouettes and ponche arabesques were rock solid.

Along with classical ballet technique, Lannin also incorporated folk dance and contemporary as seen in the Romanian dancers and Gypsies dance segments. All these techniques came together for the climatic Maypole dance. Romanian dancers stomped, Gypsies strutted and Aurelia’s Friends floated their way around the Maypole, weaving in and out of each other holding bright-colored ribbons as they went. Happy to say no one faltered during this tricky pattern sequence.

Shannon Beachman as Dracula. Photo: Nancy Loch

The party took a dark turn when Count Dracula (Shannon Beacham) arrived with his minion Ratcliff (Asia Waters) to claim Aurelia as his bride. The dim lighting and ominous music set the scene for Beacham’s arrival. Every step and hand gesture appeared calculated adding to Dracula’s mysterious aura. He stayed only long enough to hypnotize Aurelia during an erringly-moving pas de deux before stealing her away in the night.

Menacing fog and a dungeon setting welcomed us to Dracula’s Castle in Act II. Underneath the fog rested the Brides of Dracula including head bride Marcela (Alexandria Loy). Shrill music filled the air as reaching hands appeared through the fog. Dressed in white flimsy gowns and tattered veils, the Brides gradually awoke. Marcela led the 14 other brides through a graceful yet disturbing pointe routine heightened by the brides’ hissing sounds and unblinking gazes. The performers’ classical training was evident in their controlled pointe work and body placement.

The final battle between Gerding and Beachman in Act II. Photo: Nancy Loch

The pivotal fight scene between Dracula and Marius was cleaner than in previous years. The timing of the punches and lifts were better, and the actual staking of Dracula was broken down to enhance dramatic effect.

From the unique story and challenging choreography to the fresh sets, clever lighting and creative costumes and make-up, LakeCities Ballet Theatre has reached new highs with its seventh annual production of Le Ballet de Dracula, which has repeat performances at 2 and 7:30 p.m. today.