Tag Archives: Lewisville TX

Preview: LakeCities Ballet Theater’s Coppelia

Dancing Dolls

LakeCities Ballet Theatre serves up another kid-friendly ballet with Coppelia, featuring special guest Steven Loch at MCL Grand Theater in Lewsiville.

LakeCities Ballet Theatre Presents Coppelia. Photo: Nancy Loch Photography.

Lewisville — As I watched LakeCities Ballet Theatre (LBT) rehearse Act 1 of Coppelia Artistic Director Kelly Kilburn Lannin leaned over and whispered how this particular section of music always reminds her about the time their Franz injured himself mid-performance and Steven Loch, who was 12 at the time, was asked to step in and danced the final part of show perfectly.

Later, when I mentioned this story to Loch in the breakroom where we sat down to talk he laughed and says he gets acknowledged quite often for his ability to jump into roles at the last second—a skill that he says he learned from Lannin and her team at the Ballet Conservatory in Lewisville.

“There is so much supply and not enough demand so the high level of excellence gets even more exaggerated,” Loch says about what it takes today to become a professional ballet dancer. “You have to be the most valuable worker to have the best shot, and I think one of the great things about here is Kelly knew that from the beginning. She knew that if you want to make it as a dancer than you’re going to have to learn to do it all.”

Photo: Pacific Northwest Ballet
Steven Loch

He adds, “And also too, the standard that she puts on students are so high and you know have to hit those standards because there’s no forgiveness. Then, when you go the professional world you have good habits. You’re disciplined. You’re a good worker. You’re a professional and you’re a good human. And it’s actually surprising how valuable that is. And Kelly’s standard is such that even for understudies you have to be able to jump in and do it perfectly so that no one notices or you are going to be in trouble.”

But in the same breath Loch also says Lannin is very nurturing, which I saw firsthand during one of the company’s Coppelia rehearsals a couple of weeks ago. “She is so sweet and loving and gives so much of herself,” Loch says. “She gave me so much love and not only cared about me as a dancer, but also a person. She was my mentor growing up and she taught me everything in order to be ready for the professional world.”

After graduating from high school in 2009, Loch joined the professional program at Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB). He joined the company in 2011 and was promoted to corps de ballet in 2012. He was promoted to soloist at the end of last season. Throughout his career with PNB Loch has returned home on numerous occasions to perform leading roles in LBT’s productions, including DraculaGiselleThe Nutcracker and Coppelia.

As for his reasons for returning, Loch says, “This place is my home and it has given me so much so I definitely want to return the favor.”

He continues, “I also get called in to do the leading roles, which when I was younger I didn’t get the opportunities to do. It also gives me more practice and experience in these roles so when I start performing lead roles in Seattle I will be more ready.”

Regarding his reaction to the news of his promotion last season, Loch says, “When I got promoted to soloist it was really satisfying because I had put so much work into it and to see the fruits of your labor turn in to something like this just felt really special.”

He adds, “As dancers we are all perfectionists so earning this title has also definitely given me more confidence.”

Watching Loch jump into rehearsal after just stepping off a plane I couldn’t help but wonder what he does to help prevent injury and illness. On this topic Loch says, “Recovery is so important so anything that can help me speed up recovery is great. I do cryotherapy. I have Norma Tec boots. I do a lot of stretching and roll out using a roller. I also do massage and work with this lady who does Trager Approach in addition to neuromuscular therapy.”

Of all the recovery methods that he uses Loch says the cryotherapy has been the most effective for him. “It’s so much more efficient than icing because you are put in such a cold environment that the blood goes to your core instead of your extremities. So it’s more nutrient rich, and it only takes three minutes, and you are able to move afterwards, so you can do it before working out or after working out. And it makes you recover three times faster than you normally would so, for me that has been a huge game changer.”

You can check out Loch in LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s rendition of Coppelia, March 29-31, at the Medical City of Lewisville Grand Theater in Lewisville.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

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Review: LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s Dracula

This was the first ballet I brought my daughter to and she did great. She is 2 1/2 and sat through the whole first half. The second half was a little scary so my husband took her into the lobby. I recommend this show for anyone with little kids.

Photo: Nancy Loch
Photo: Nancy Loch

LakeCities Ballet Theatre sucks audiences in with brilliant dancing and dramatic special effects at its 10th annual Le Ballet de Dracula in Lewisville.

Lewisville — After a decade, it’s natural for a ballet to start to lose some of its luster. But that’s not the case with LakeCities Ballet Theatre‘s Halloween spook-tacular, Le Ballet de Dracula, which played to a sold-out crowd for the troupe’s 10th-anniversary show on Saturday at the Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theatre.

Having seen this production many times before, I can honestly say the ballet gets visually and technically stronger every year thanks to Artistic Director Kelly Kilburn Lannin’s fine choreographic detailing and continous production enhancements, including set designs, costuming and special effects that always seem to bring audiences to the edge of their seats.

The show’s popularity can also be attributed to Tom Rutherford’s well-conceived narrative and creative mash-up of characters including Ratcliff (the quirky sidekick), weolas (batlike creatures) and a dozen vampire brides.

Loosely based on Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, LBT’s version illustrates the love triangle between Aurelia, Marius and Dracula in two well-balanced acts. In the first half the villagers, gypsies and Romanians all come together to celebrate the engagement of Aurelia (Carley Denton) and Marius (guest artist Steven Loch of Pacific Northwest Ballet).

The company members demonstrated great animation and agility in the specialized group dances, which featured various movement styles, including soft-shoe ballet, pointe, jazz, modern and even some folk dance. The Romanian dancers’ rhythmic foot stomps and traveling shuffle steps were accompanied by simple arm gestures and crisp formation changes.

The gypsies, led by Denise Clarkston, used an array of hip isolations and open-armed twirling phrases to depict their rebellious nature. Aurelia’s friends (Chloe Davis, Kristina Lorelli, Carly Greene, Julie Fenske, Madeline Hanly and Julia Tiller) proved why LBT is one of the most sought after pre-professional ballet companies in the Dallas area with their exacting pointe work, beautiful musicality and commanding stage presence.

One of the newer additions to the show was a musically enchanting pas de deux with company member Michelle Lawyer and guest artist Dan Westfield pf Ballet Frontier of Texas. Lawyer’s lithe frame and nimble point work balanced out Westfield’s wider frame and explosive jump sequences.

In the partnering sections each pulled from the other’s strengths and suddenly Lawyer’s sautés were as high as Westfield’s, and his arms placement and fourth lunges were just as soft as Lawyer’s. The exchanging of the tambourine throughout the pas de duex was perfectly timed and added a new musical layer to the dance.

Carley Denton’s role as Aurelia was well-earned. Her flexibility and stamina has improved over the last year, demonstrated through her various sustained body positions and lightning-quick pique turns. She has also found the key to releasing the tension in her shoulders with the help of certain breathing techniques.

Steven Loch continues to breathe new life into the role of Marius with his limitless energy and technical fortitude. The couple’s pas de deux was a lovely display of unending lines and counterbalance poses topped with Denton’s six continuous pirouettes into a luxurious body dip at the end.

The maypole dance that Lannin incorporated about six years ago remains one of the highlights of the first half. In this scene 12 dancers frolicked around a 15-foot pole, creating an intricate weaving pattern with the brightly colored streamers they carried. Rhythmic clapping accompanied the dancers’ spritely skips and gallop steps.

The mood changed drastically when Dracula (Shannon Beacham) and his minion Ratcliff (Asia Waters) arrived to lure Aurelia away from her family and Marius. Over the years Beacham has perfected the role of Dracula, from his menacing walks and nuanced cape flicks to the overly dramatic facial expressions.

Smoke machines and special lighting techniques succeeded in creating the illusion of Dracula appearing out of thin air. The dim lighting, ominous music and ghostly appearance of Dracula’s brides in the second half evenly matched the dancers’ loose, hanging arms, soundless bourrees across the floor and vacant expressions.

Julia Tiller (Marcela) set the tone at the beginning of the scene with her solid pointe work and expansive arm-gesturing. The fight scene between Loch and Beacham started off spotty with some lengthy pauses between their physical exchanges, but they quickly found their rhythm. Mindful of the young ones in the audience, the really heavy moments were lightened by Waters’ constant wandering and clumsy interactions with the brides.

Wildly creative, meticulously produced and cleverly choreographed, LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s Le Ballet de Dracula is sure to continue entertaining audiences for the next 10 years.

This review was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

Review: Music In Motion, LakeCities Ballet Theatre

LakeCities Ballet Theatre performs a season finale program called Music in Motion. Photo: Nancy Loch Photography
LakeCities Ballet Theatre performs a season finale program called Music in Motion. Photo: Nancy Loch Photography

LakeCities Ballet Theatre closes its season with fresh moves and dexterous classical technique during its spring performance.

Lewisville — Don’t let the name fool you. LakeCities Ballet Theatre (LBT) is much more than a pre-professional ballet company, and they proved that Saturday night with Music In Motion at the MCL Grand Theater in Lewisville, ending their season on a high note. Known for their exuberant story ballets and exquisite technique, it may have surprised some to see the company attacking other dance styles such as modern, jazz and contemporary with the same boldness they do classical ballet.

The show opened with a flirty, baroque-fashioned pointe number choreographed by LBT staff member and Juilliard alum Deborah Weaver called Les Oiseaux de Ville. Weaver’s trained ear picked up on all the instrumental nuances in Aram Khachaturian’s composition which added new vigor to the art form’s unchanging technique. For example,pique arabesques finished with flexed palms and bourrees executed with fluttering hands drew attention to the music’s various instrumental phrases. The gold-laced, fingerless gloves which matched the 12 dancers’ gold and white knee-length tutus boosted the visual appeal of these movements. Weaver’s expanding and contracting formation changes and explosive cotangent sequences were also visually stunning.

Shannon Beacham’s Urban Perfume was the biggest surprise of the evening. Set to music by Sven Helbig this contemporary jazz number, performed in soft shoe, featured daring leaps, aggressive runs and simultaneous head and body isolations. The piece started with the six dancers stepping into second position with a contracted torso and arms thrusting down and away from the body. The phrase was repeated as the dancers switch places. As the music built the running became more frantic till the dancers exploded into fouette arabesque leaps and head-whackingbattements. Beacham’s time with Texas Ballet Theater and the Bruce Wood Dance Company showed through his quirky, yet controlled body movements and the opposing tempos he assigned each dancer during certain sections. The dim lighting and shimmering biketards added to the suspense of the piece. Even through the ending was a little underwhelming with the dancers simply running off stage, the core material of the work was still edgy and inspiring.

LBT in Shannon Beacham's Urban Perfume. Photo: Nancy Loch Photogrpahy
LBT in Shannon Beacham’s Urban Perfume. Photo: Nancy Loch Photogrpahy

Pulling double duty as choreographer and performer, Beacham and his wife Christa were phenomenal in their roles as Romeo and Juliet in the ballet’s balcony Pas de Deux. Every caress and assisted lift exuded passion. The trust between the two was undeniable as Christa catapulted herself into Beacham’s arms only to be pressed up into a standing position above his head. The traveling steps for the pair may have been simple but the assisted pirouetteturns and alternating ponche arabesque holds were anything but. Sergei Prokofiev’s heart-wrenching composition only enhanced the couple’s star-crossed love for one another.

LBT 2 Director Shannon Tate’s Where the Sun is Silent challenged the dancers with its modern verbiage and dramatic storyline. Dressed in black liturgical dresses the 10-member group started clumped together arching back and reaching in different directions. The movement encompassed various modern dance techniques, including Martha Graham’s signature contractions and back hinges as well as Lester Horton’s lateral T’s and general ferocity.

The first act ended with LBT Assistant Director Nancy Loch’s rock ballet Move It! which the company premiered in 1998. Dressed all in black with music by Church of Rhythm this funky pointe number transported the audience back to the 90s’. This 17-person ensemble moved with The Rockettes precision as they shifted into a straight line and moved clockwise around the stage on pointe. The walking which made up a majority of the piece was accompanied by hand gestures resembling Madonna’s 1990 Vogue video.

In the second half LBT revealed what they do best in Joseph Mazilier and Marius Petipa’s Paquita. Known as one of the most technically challenging 19th century ballets, Paquita demanded serious control, technical brilliance and unending endurance from the LBT dancers. The first thing audience members noticed was that in many sections the corps mirrored the movement of Principal Dancer Mackenna Pieper. While one or two arabesque holds where not quite aligned with the rest overall the corp gave a strong unified performance. Ali Honchell, Michelle Lawyer and Beacham excelled in the multi-tempoed Pas de Trois. The female’s solos were filled with complex entrechats (a weaving jump from fifth) with multiple beats, double pique turns and grand jetes which they handled with poise. And Beacham seamlessly maneuvered both dancers through a series of composed arabesque and attitude holds.

Steven Loch and Mackenna Pieper in Paquita. Photo: Nancy Loch Photography
Steven Loch and Mackenna Pieper in Paquita. Photo: Nancy Loch Photography

Guest Artist Steven Loch was a powerful force in the pas de deux, but the shining star of the evening was Pieper as Paquita. Tall and leggy Pieper gave each slow developpe arabesque its due. Pieper also managed the quickpirouettes and cabriole soutenu sections with exemplary control and fiery spirit. Overall Paquita was a great match for LakeCities Ballet Theatre. The ballet’s detailed classicism, specifically the proper epaulement (upper body positioning), is one of the many skills Artistic Director Kelly Lannin has drilled into her dancers’ bodies with great results.

This review was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

Texas Treasure

Photo: courtesy of LBT
Photo: courtesy of LBT

Artistic Director Kelly Lannin on LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s upcoming performance, Treasures: 30 Years of Dance, and the company’s influence on the Lewisville community.

Lewisville — “My goal has always been to build a ballet company that the City of Lewisville can be proud of,” says LakeCities Ballet Theatre Artistic Director Kelly Lannin. Now with 30 years  under its belt, a number of students going on to dance professionally, and a Nutcracker production that draws large crowds every year, LBT has surpassed even Lannin’s expectations. “I can’t believe it has been 30 years. Time just flew by.”

Originally from El Paso, Lannin trained at Ballet El Paso before attending Texas Woman’s University where she was the recipient of the Mary Agnes Murphy and the Anne Duggan Dance Scholarships. While at TWU Lannin performed with Dance Repertory Theatre and the DRT Touring Ensemble. After graduating with a Bachelor’s degree in dance in 1983, she moved to Lewisville to begin her teaching career. Lannin was a charter member of the Lewisville Dance Ensemble (1984) before taking over as artistic director in 1989, and changing the name to LakeCities Ballet Theatre.

The name change was done to give the company a more professional aire, according to Lannin. Instead of an ensemble she wanted to create a regional ballet company that would one day present multiple full-length ballets. A feat, she says, that took a lot of time and patience. “The first decade was about training the dancers and getting the community excited. The second decade we decided to contract with the Lewisville Lake Symphony for The Nutcracker and for the last decade we have been working hard to challenge our dancers in a variety of ballets and dance styles.” Today, Lannin has successfully directed and staged a number of productions, including The NutcrackerLe Ballet de DraculaThe Sleeping BeautyGiselleCoppeliaThe Little Humpbacked HorseCinderellaAlice in Wonderland, Peter and the Wolf and Carmina Burana, just to name a few.

And while Lannin says the dancers’ level of commitment hasn’t change over the years the level of competition within the ballet field continues to rise. “The level of training has just gotten better. Taking class three days a week isn’t cutting it anymore.” She adds that today’s ballet dancers also have to compete with dancers from other countries for those coveted ballet jobs. “These dancers from other countries like China, Japan, and Cuba are incredibly talented and have really upped the ante.”

Another challenge Lannin continues to face deals with funding. “Finding money and then figuring out where to spend it will always be a challenge. Thankfully we have a great parent base that we can always count on whenever we need volunteers. We have some parents who continue to volunteer even after their kids graduate and for me that is the biggest reward.”

Photo: courtesy of LBT
Photo: courtesy of LBT

Lannin says the arts scene in Lewisville has also come a long way over the last 30 years. “Before LBT Lewisville didn’t really have a dance community. I think there were two local dance studios and that’s it. We basically had to build an audience base from scratch.” The Greater Lewisville Arts Alliance, Lewisville Lake Symphony and LBT all came into being around the same time and continue to support one another today. “We remain very close as we are still run by the same group of people. And when the Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theater opened in 2011 it gave all of us a place to call home.”

It’s at the MCL Grand Theater where LBT will be celebrating its 30th Anniversary April 25-26, 2014 with a Spring Gala performance entitled Treasures: 30 Years of Dance. Lannin will present some of her favorite works from past years, including Carmina BuranaPas de Deux from Le Corsaire and Satanella. The program also features new works by choreographers Shannon Beacham, Deborah Weaver and Shannon Tate as well as an alumni number.

This feature was originally published on TheaterJones.com.

Review: LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s Coppelia

Madison McKay and Nigel Burgoine in LBT's Coppelia. Photo: Nancy Loch
Madison McKay and Nigel Burgoine in LBT’s Coppelia. Photo: Nancy Loch

ALL DOLLED UP

LakeCities Ballet Theatre closes its 2012-13 season with a well-executed version of Coppelia.

Lewisville — The LakeCities Ballet Theatre’s presentation of Coppelia Friday night at the Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theater encompassed everything the company strives for: crisp technique, an innate sense of musicality and authentic storytelling.

Originally staged in Paris in 1870 by Arthur Saint-Leon with music by Leo Delibes, Coppelia tells the tale of soon-to-be-married Swanilda and Franz. Franz’s obsession with Coppelia who sits in the upstairs window of Dr. Coppelius’ house creates a rift with his future bride, but Swanilda is just as curious about the motionless girl. When opportunity knocks, Swanilda and her friends sneak into the house only to discover that Coppelia is actually a doll. When Dr. Coppelius returns Swanilda switches places with Coppelia to avoid getting caught. She then convinces Franz that she is really the one he loves and they live happily ever after.

Madison McKay and Steven Loch. Photo: Nancy Loch
Madison McKay and Steven Loch. Photo: Nancy Loch

Madison McKay played a delightful Swanilda. Her solid technique and intricate point work only enhanced her character’s strong, yet loveable personality. Even though her fast foot work appeared labored at times, her graceful lines and natural stage presence overshadowed all of that.

The chemistry between McKay and Pacific Northwest Ballet corps member Steven Loch (Franz) was evenly balanced. Both are powerful dancers with amazing stamina, which only enhanced the audiences’ anticipation for their pas de deux at the end of the show. We were not disappointed. Loch ate up the stage with his grande jetes and double tours en l’air while McKay dazzled with her pique turns sequence.

Guest artist Nigel Burgoine tied the whole performance together with his kooky and over-the-top interpretation of Dr. Coppelius.

Kelly Lannin and Allan Kinzie’s choreography throughout the show really played to the Company’s strengths. The group pieces in Act 1 and 3 contained a lot of fast movement taking the dancers through a maze of weaving patterns and direction changes that were both unexpected and visually pleasing. The choreographers also mixed in some adagio sequences to display the older company member’s superb control and seamless leg extensions.

LBT's presentation of Coppelia. Photo: Nancy Loch
LBT’s presentation of Coppelia. Photo: Nancy Loch

The scene in Dr. Coppelius’ house opened with a view of 12 beautifully costumed, perfectly still performers posing as dolls. While the story was captivating, the audience’s attention was drawn most to the still dolls in anticipation of a grand sequence that never really happened. While there were tastes of each doll’s quirky personality and staccato way of moving with each one occasionally coming to life, we wanted to see more.

Overall it was a very well-executed performance by LakeCities Ballet Theatre. The practically flawless technique, well-thought out and clean choreography and the understated, yet effective lighting and detailed set design made for a very enjoyable evening.

This review was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.