Tag Archives: Andre Silva

Preview: Texas Ballet Theater’s In the Middle Performance

Power in Numbers

Andre Silva shares the significance of the number sigh 11:11 in his new work of the same name for Texas Ballet Theater’s performance this weekend.

 

Photos: Andre Silva (L) courtesy of Texas Ballet Theater. Andre Silva’s 11:11 (R) courtesy of Steven Visneau.

Fort Worth — You have seen him portray princes, villains and heroes in numerous ballets presented by Texas Ballet Theater (TBT), but, for the first time, audiences will get to see who Andre Silva is as a choreographer in his work 11:11, part of TBT’s In The Middle performance March 1-3 at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth. The program also includes William Forsythe’s In The Middle, Somewhat Elevated and Christopher Bruce’s Ghost Dances.

Originally from Brazil, Silva began his professional ballet career with TBT at the age of 17. He danced with the company until 2009 when he decided to leave to dance abroad with Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montreal from 2009-2014. From there he danced with Germany’s Ballet Augusburg for a year before returning to TBT in 2015, much to audiences’ delight.

Throughout his time with TBT Silva has danced leading roles in many of Ben Stevenson’s ballets, including Peer GyntRomeo and JulietSwan LakeDraculaBartokPreludes for VanFive Poems, and Mozart Requiem. Some other works he has performed in include Val Caniparoli’s Without Borders, Christopher Wheeldon’s DGV: Danse à Grande Vitesse, Christopher Bruce’s Rooster, Carlos Acosta’s Carmen and Alexei Ratmansky’s Seven Sonatas.

Silva says what ultimately brought him back to TBT was Stevenson. “I love his leadership. What he brings to the table. The way that he coaches the dancers. The way that he choreographs. And I love his energy.”

He goes on to say, “TBT was my first company when I was 17 so I came into the company very young and I learned so much from Ben. He gave me my first leading role when I was 18.  So, I really wanted to dance under the direction of Ben Stevenson again. I wanted to do his ballets again and I also wanted to work with the staff again. So, that was the reason I came back and I am very happy to be back.”

He also points out that his decision to leave TBT was mostly to explore what was out there and learn from various directors and choreographers in Canada and then Europe.

Silva admits that he was speechless when Stevenson approached him about creating a piece for the company. He says up until then he had only set work on the school and second company.  “He really took me by surprise. In a year and a half I had created three to four pieces so I suppose I showed him that I was capable of doing this. When he approached me he said ‘I think you are ready for the company’ and I was like WHAT, but I was obviously extremely grateful and I still am and forever will be because I get to show what and who I am as a choreographer.”

The title, 11:11, came to Silva while he was working in Germany and has remained in the back of his mind so when Stevenson came to him about doing a piece Silva knew exactly what he was going to call it. The 25-minute work features 22 dancers (11 men and 11 women) and is broken up into nine movements. The work also includes costumes by Brazilian native Sonia Roveri, which Silva says fits the theme with its blending of colors and concepts that connect with the movement.

As for his experience in the studio with the dancers Silva says, “It was very collaborative. I would come in with a short phrase and allow the dancers to collaborate and let their bodies move in a way, and if I like the way they move or the way they approached it then I loved to put that in.”

He continues, “I am a very collaborative choreographer. I think it makes the work much more interesting because the movement comes in the moment and it becomes real and natural, and that’s also what 11:11 means to me. 11:11 is in the moment. 11:11 is infinite. And so it becomes this beautiful experience for me to be able to have dancers that are opened as well. It becomes a natural and interesting approach and I am always content with how things turn out.”

When it comes to organizing movement ahead of time Silva says he prefers to do it at home in his back yard or at the park where he can garner inspiration from everything around him in nature. He also says that he used to try to write everything down, but now prefers not to prepare too much before coming into the studio with the dancers. “This challenges me to accept that it will be O.K in the end and that I will come up with something special out of that.”

Going back to the title Silva says that for some people it may mean nothing, but for others it could have many different meanings. In this work the nine movements represent nine experiences Silva has had with 11:11. As for the audience he says, “I hope that people can understand perhaps what it means or take away something for their future reference as 11:11 or just have some kind of perspective of 11:11.”

He adds, “It’s important that each audience leaves the theater hopefully inspired and intrigued by their next experiences with 11:11.”

During our phone conversation Silva was also very opened about the struggles that come with choreographing any type of work. The main one being what happens when a choreographer gets stuck. When this happened to Silva he says he would remind himself of his intentions for the work. “When I am struggling and stuck I have to remember what the intention behind it is. What is it that I want to come through? And the moment that I think about that the feeling is what actually gives me movement.”

He confesses, “It’s not easy to do, but I have to trust that intuition and just let it flow. And the moment we trust it, that’s when it flows better than you ever thought it would.”

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.

 

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Preview: Texas Ballet Theater’s Cleopatra

Dancing Queen

Carolyn Judson on her role as the Queen of the Nile in Texas Ballet Theater’s production of Cleopatra in Fort Worth this weekend.

Carolyn Judson as Cleopatra. Photo: Steven Visneau

Fort Worth — With her girl-next-door looks and sweet disposition, Carolyn Judson is the obvious choice to play the female lead in story ballets such as GiselleCinderellaRomeo and Juliet and The Nutcracker. In addition to her physical attributes, Judson’s penchant for softer, more pliable body positions, delicate foot work and beautifully drawn out leg extensions also make for easy casting decisions. But this weekend she will be trading in these sweet roles for something more seductive in Texas Ballet Theater’s (TBT) Cleopatra at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth.

Transforming into this powerful temptress has been a fun challenge for Judson who also played the part in TBT’s 2009 production of Cleopatra. But because back then she only got the role last minute, Judson says she was more focused on learning the steps than working on the characterization, something she hopes to rectify this time around.

“This time around I really wanted to try and capture that strong woman human quality that I think is Cleopatra,” Judson says.

As to how she accomplished this task Judson says timing both in the literal sense and where she is artistically speaking played a pivotal role in the rehearsal process. “Well, for one thing I have had more time to devote to the character. I also have more experience to pull from and richer character development than I did years ago, which has really helped because this role is so emotionally draining.”

Judson is the type of dancer who learns by doing the movement as it materializes from the choreographer. So, when rehearsing for Cleopatra she says she retains movement best when she is copying what TBT Artistic Director Ben Stevenson is doing alongside her. But when it comes to understanding a certain feeling or emotion, Judson says she will usually watch Stevenson from the front so she doesn’t miss any of his nuances.

For this weekend’s performance Judson will be reunited with her former Cleopatra partner Andre Silva, whom she says she used to partner with all the time before he left the company only to return a couple of years ago. “Other than doing the sugar plum fairy variation in The Nutcracker last season this is our first full-length ballet together since he has come back, and we’re just really excited to be working together again. That we have been building on things that we’ve experienced in the past 16 years here has made our bond even stronger and we’re really enjoying our work together.”

Another beautiful bonus of TBT’s Cleopatra performance is the live accompaniment provided by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra and conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya. Judson points out that the majority of rehearsals have been to recorded music and it wasn’t until two weeks prior to the show that the conductor came to the studio to lay the music out on the piano.

“This way he can get used to our tempos and we can get used to doing something that’s not going to be always the same.” She adds, “This is important because it does takes quite a bit of rearranging your brain when dancing to live music since our minds kind of go on autopilot with a recording a lot of the time. So, it’s really helpful for us to have those two weeks before to get used to the music for both the dancers and the conductor.” She also notes that the company will not get to perform with the full orchestra until the Wednesday before the show.

A fun fact I learned about Judson is that during performances with live music she likes to find moments in the show to make eye contact with the conductor. “I think there are times when it’s appropriate to look at the conductor during a performance. For example, whenever I’m taking a bow I end up looking at him as sort of a thank you because this is such a nice collaboration between musicians and artists and so it’s much more enjoyable for us to feel like we are all working on the same project and not just two separate entities.” She adds, “I don’t look at the conductor all the way through the ballet, but I think there are times when you can really bring him in to the action on stage.”

It’s hard to talk to any professional ballet dancer nowadays without bringing up the lawsuit against New York City Ballet and Principal Chase Finlay and other scandals involving the company over the last year. With this in mind I wanted to know what steps, if any, has TBT taken to ensure that its dancers and staff feel safe and supported. “Actually at the end of last season we did have a company come in and work with us on just being mindful of how we talk to each other and how we treat each other. We also have our school here in the same building and just being aware of treatment of the children as well especially since some of the company dancers are also teachers at the school.”

She adds, “So yes we did go through a program with tests and educational information just to make sure that everyone is on the same page. And we are so lucky that we have a really great working environment here and we all consider each other family and in fact most of us are married to other people in the company.”

You can see Judson in Texas Ballet Theater’s production of Cleopatra Sept. 28-30 at Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth.

This preview was originally posted on TheaterJones.com.